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Entries are listed alphabetically. The first line (in bold) is the term used to describe the subject, which is also a hyperlink to every item in the IBCC Digital Archive described with that tag, followed by relevant losses data. The second line (in italics) contains alternative forms, such as spelling variants, abbreviations or colloquialisms.

Indentations are used to denote a parent/child structure, in which the main entry is a broad category followed by sub-categories. This allows for users to either narrow or expand the focus of their searches.

Albemarle - losses
Used for: Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle

The Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle was originally designed as a bomber but by the time it entered service in 1943 it was reassigned as a twin-engined glider tug, reconnaissance and special transport aircraft. 600 were built and it was the first British military aircraft with tricycle landing gear. The RAF used them in airborne operations to drop paratroops and tow gliders. It carried a crew of four, had a wingspan of 77 ft (23 m), a length of 59 ft 11 in (18 m) and a maximum speed of 265 mph (426 kph).

Anson - losses
Used for: Avro Anson

The twin-engined Avro Anson entered service in 1936 in Coastal Command in a general reconnaissance role which it fulfilled until 1942. From 1939 it was also used in Training Command for training navigators, wireless operators and air gunners. Many were built and used in Canada under the Commonwealth Air Training Scheme. Also used as light transports Ansons finally retired from the RAF in 1968. 11,020 were built. It had a top speed of 188 mph (303 kph), a cruising speed of 158 mph (254 kph) and a range of 790 miles (1270 kms). Wing span was 56 ft 6 in (17 m) and length was 42 ft 3 in (13 m).

Ar 232
Used for: Arado Ar 232, Tausendfüßler, Tatzelwurm

The Ar 232 was a Luftwaffe transport aircraft first flown in June 1941 but only 24 were built. It had tricycle landing gear which, when on the ground, could ‘kneel’ allowing the aircraft to sit on 22 pairs of smaller wheels fixed to the underneath of the fuselage. This lowered the aircraft for ease of loading up to 10,000 lb (4535 kgs). Four radial engines gave it a maximum speed of 211 mph (340 kph). It had a crew of 4, a wing span of 109 ft 11in (33.5 m) and a length of 77 ft 2in (23.5 m).

B-17 - losses
Used for: Boeing B-17, B17, Flying Fortress

The Boeing B-17 was commonly known as the Flying Fortress due to its multiple defensive guns. It was a four-engined daylight bomber used throughout the war by the United States Army Air Force. It first flew in 1935 and more than 12,700 were built. About 220 were used by the RAF, mostly in Coastal Command. Bomber Command used them briefly in 1941 for daylight bombing. In 1944-45 B-17s equipped two squadrons in 100 Group in an electronic countermeasures role. It had a wingspan of 103 ft 9 in (31.5 m) and a length of 73 ft (22 m). It had a maximum speed of 280 mph (450 kph). With a crew of 8-10 it had a normal range of 1140 miles (1835 kms) and could carry a bomb load of 12,800 lbs (5800 kgs).

B-24 - losses
Used for: Consolidated B-24 Liberator, B24, Liberator

The Consolidated B-24, also known as the Liberator, first flew in December 1939. It was a high wing heavy bomber although it was also used in long range anti-submarine maritime patrol and transport roles. It served in the United States Army Air Force and the RAF in the European, Pacific, Mediterranean and Middle East theatres. With the RAF it served in both Bomber Command and Coastal Command. More than 18,000 were built. It had a wing span of 110 ft (33.5 m), a length of 67 ft 2 in (20.5 m). With four radial engines and a crew of 8 it had a top speed of 270 mph (435 kph), a maximum range of 2290 miles (3685 kms) and a maximum bomb load of 12,800 lb (5800 kgs).

B-25 - losses
Used for: North American B-25 Mitchell, B25, Mitchell

The North American B-25 was also known as the Mitchell. It was a twin-engined medium bomber with a crew of five. It first entered service with the United States Army Air Force in August 1941. From September 1942 over 800 B-25s were delivered to the RAF where they were used primarily as day bombers in 2 Group and, subsequently, the Second Tactical Air Force. It had a wing span of 67 ft 6 in (20.5 m), a length of 54 ft 1 in (16.5 m), a top speed of 292 mph (470 kph) and a normal bomb load of 4000 lb (1814 kgs).

B-26
Used for: Martin B-26 Marauder

The Martin B-26 was also known as the Marauder. It was a twin-engined medium bomber first flown in November 1940. Over 5100 were built. About 520 B-26s were used by the RAF and South African Air Force in the Mediterranean theatre. The United States Army Air Force used B-26s in both the Pacific and European theatres. It had a crew of six and armament comprised up to eight 0.5 machine guns and a bomb load of 4000 lbs (1814 kgs). It had a wingspan of 71 ft (21.5 m), a length of 57 ft 6 in (17.5 m) and a maximum speed of 305 mph (490 kph).

B-29
Used for: Boeing B-29 Superfortress, Washington

The Boeing B-29 was also known as the Superfortress. It was a four-engined long range heavy bomber that first flew in 1942 and over 4200 were used by the United States Army  Air Force. During the war they were only used in the Pacific Theatre and dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945. During the 1950s 88 B-29s known as Washingtons were used by Bomber Command. The B-29 had a wingspan of 141 ft 3 in (43 m) and a length of 99 ft (30 m). It had a crew of 10-14, a maximum speed of 350 mph (9560 kph) and a normal bomb load of 12,000 lbs (5440 kgs).

Battle - losses
Used for: Fairey Battle

The Fairey Battle was a single engined light bomber. It entered Bomber Command service in May 1937 and equipped 1 Group. In September 1939 Battles were sent to France as the Advanced Air Striking Force. The Battle proved vulnerable and sustained heavy losses. Withdrawn from front line operations in September 1940 Battles continued to serve in a training role. 2419 were built. With a crew of three it had a wing span of 54 ft (16.5 m) and a length of 42 ft (13 m). Its Merlin engine gave it a maximum speed of 241 mph (388 kph) and it could carry a bomb load of 1000 lb (454 kg).

Beaufighter - losses
Used for: Bristol Beaufighter, Bristol Type 156, Beau

The Bristol Beaufighter served in two major roles; a night-fighter with Fighter Command and a long range rocket and torpedo fighter with Coastal Command. It also served in 100 Group in Bomber Command as well as in the Middle and Far East. It first flew in July 1939 and entered service in September 1940. The RAF had over 5500 Beaufighters and it equipped 52 squadrons. It had a wingspan of 57 ft 10 in (17.5 m) and a length of 41 ft 8 in (13 m). With two radial engines it had a top speed of 333 mph (536 kph) and a range of 1480 miles (2380 kms). It had a crew of two and had four 20mm cannons in the nose, six .303 machine guns in the wings and could carry one torpedo or 8 rockets plus two 250 lb (113 kgs) bombs.

Blenheim - losses
Used for: Bristol Blenheim

The Bristol Blenheim was a twin-engined light bomber. It entered Bomber Command service in 1937 and equipped 2 Group squadrons until late 1941. It last operated in Bomber Command in August 1942. Variants of Blenheims also served in Fighter Command and Coastal Command as well as overseas in the Mediterranean, Mid and Far East. 4422 Blenheims were built. With a crew of 3 the Blenheim Mk 4 had a wing span of 56 ft 4 in (17 m) and length of 42 ft 7 in (13 m). Top speed was 266 mph (428 kph), range 1460 miles (2350 kms) and bomb load was 1000 lb internally (454 kgs) and 320 lb (145 kgs) externally.

Bolingbroke
Used for: Bristol Bolingbroke

The Bolingbroke was the name given to the version of the Blenheim built under licence in Canada and used by the Royal Canadian Air Force as a maritime patrol aircraft and trainer. 626 were built and used from 1940-44. With a crew of 3 the Bolingbroke had a wing span of 56 ft. 4 in (17 m) and length of 42 ft. 7 in (13 m). Top speed was 288 mph (463 kph), range 1860 miles (2990 kms) and bomb load was 1000 lb (454 kgs).

Boston - losses
Used for: Douglas A-20 Havoc, DB-7

The twin engined Douglas Boston had many variants. The day bomber variant entered service with Bomber Command in 2 Group in July 1941. This type carried a crew of 4, had a wing span of 61 ft 4 in (18.5 m), and a length of 47 ft (14 m). It had a maximum speed of 304 mph (489 kph), a range of 1020 miles (1642 km) and a maximum bomb load of 2000 lb (907 kgs). Bostons were also used by the RAF in Italy, North Africa and by the Second Tactical Air Force. 7500 Bostons of all types were built and variants operated by the United States Army Air Force and also the Russians.

Botha 
Used for: Blackburn B.26 Botha

The twin-engined Botha was originally designed for Coastal Command as a general reconnaissance aircraft and torpedo-bomber. It first flew in December 1938 but was found to be under-powered, unstable and with poor visibility. It only served operationally with 608 Squadron at RAF Thornaby from August to November 1940. It was subsequently used for training and target tug purposes, including for Bomber Command navigators and air gunners. Of the 580 built 169 were written off in accidents. With a crew of four it had a wing span of 59 ft (18 m), a length of 51 ft 1 in (15.5 m) and a top speed of 220 mph (354 km/hr). It was armed with one forward .303 machine gun and two .303 machine guns in a dorsal turret. It could carry a torpedo or up to 2000 lb (907 kg) of bombs.

C-47 - losses
Used for: Skytrain, DC3, DC-3 Dakota, Douglas DC-3

The C-47, also known as the Dakota, was a widely used transport aircraft by both the United States Army Air Force and RAF Transport Command. Almost 11,000 were built. It first flew in December 1935, entered RAF service in March 1943 and the last RAF C-47 finally retired in April 1970. It played a major role in transporting troops and towing gliders in airborne operations during World War Two as well as in a general cargo role in the post-war Berlin airlift. It had a wingspan of 95 ft (29 m) and a length of 64 ft 6 in (20 m). Its twin radial engines gave it a maximum speed of 230 mph (370 kph) and a normal range of 1500 miles (2400 kms). With a crew of 3 or 4 it could carry 28 troops.

Catalina
Used for: Catalina flying boat, Consolidated PBY Catalina, Canso

The Consolidated Catalina was a general long range reconnaissance and anti-submarine flying boat. It entered service with the United States Navy in 1936 and RAF Coastal Command in March 1941. Catalinas operated in the Atlantic, Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and Far East. It had a crew of 8 or 9 and twin radial engines gave it a maximum speed of 190 mph (305 kph). It had an endurance of 17.5 hours, a wing span of 104 ft (32 m), a length of 65 ft 2 in (20 m) and it could carry 2000 lb (907 kgs) of bombs or depth charges.

Commodore
Used for: Consolidated Commodore

The Consolidated Commodore was a twin-engined commercial flying boat. First flown in 1928 fourteen were built and used mainly in the Caribbean. It had a crew of three and could carry 22 passengers. The design concept was eventually developed into the later Catalina flying boat used during World War Two. The Commodore had a wingspan of 100 feet (30.5 m), a length of 61 ft 6 in (19 m) and a maximum speed of 128 mph (206 kph).

Cornell
Used for: Fairchild PT-26

The Cornell was a two-seat monoplane basic trainer used by the Royal Canadian Air Force during the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. It served in Canadian Elementary Flying Schools 1942 - 1948. Over 1600 Cornells were built, initially in America but later in Canada. It had a wingspan of 37 ft (11 m) and a length of 28 ft 8 in (9 m). The single Ranger engine gave it a top speed of 122 mph (196 kph).

Defiant - losses
Used for: Boulton Paul Defiant

The Defiant first flew in 1937, introducing a new fighter concept in that it had no forward armament but instead had a gun turret behind the pilot with four .303 machine guns. Early successes against Luftwaffe bombers in May 1940 were however followed by heavy losses as it proved vulnerable to German fighters. In August 1940 it was withdrawn from daylight operations but 13 night-fighter squadrons used the Defiant during 1940-41. In 1942 some were converted to target-tugs and air-sea rescue duties. A total of 1064 Defiants were built. With a single Merlin engine it had a maximum speed of 313 mph (504 kph). Defiants had a crew of two, a wing span of 39 ft 4 in (12 m) and a length of 35 ft 4 in (11 m).

Do 16
Used for: Dornier 16 , Wal, Dornier Do J

The Dornier 16 was a German flying boat. It first flew in 1922 and by the time production ceased in 1936 more than 250 had been built. It had two opposing engines mounted centrally, one tractor and one ‘pusher’. It was used by civilian airlines with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. A military version carried a crew of four in an open cockpit and was used by Germany, Italy, Spain, Argentina, Chile and the Netherlands. It had a wingspan of 72 ft 2 in (22 m), a length of 56 ft 7 in (17 m) and a maximum speed of 115 mph (185 kph).

Do 18
Used for: Dornier 18, Dornier Do 18

The Dornier Do 18 was a twin-engined flying boat used by the Luftwaffe. With a crew of four it was used primarily for reconnaissance and air-sea rescue duties. It first flew in March 1935 and 170 were built but by mid 1941 most had been withdrawn from service. It had a wingspan of 77 ft 9 in (24 m), a length of 63 ft 1 in (19 m) and a maximum speed of 160 mph (250 kph).

Do 24
Used for: Dornier 24, Dornier Do 24

The Dornier Do 24 was a German reconnaissance and air sea rescue flying boat. It had three engines, a crew of 4 or 6, a top speed of 190 mph, a wingspan of 88 ft 7 in (27 m) and a length of 72 ft 4 in (22 m). It first flew in July 1937 and 279 were built. During the 1930s it was used by the Dutch as well as the Germans.

Do 215
Used for: Dornier 215, Dornier Do 215

The Dornier Do 215 was a twin-engined German medium bomber and night-fighter. It was developed as an export version of the Dornier Do 17 but in fact it was mainly used by the Luftwaffe. It first flew in 1938. It had a wingspan of 59 ft 1 in (18 m), a length of 51 ft 10 in (16 m) and a maximum speed of 290 mph (470 kph). With a crew of 4 it could carry a bomb load of 2200 lbs (1000 kgs). 105 were built.

Do 217
Used for: Dornier 217, Dornier Do 217

The Dornier Do 217 was a twin-engined German medium bomber and night-fighter. It was developed from the Dornier Do 17 and 1925 were built. It entered Luftwaffe service in 1941.  It had a wingspan of 62 ft 4 in (19 m), a length of 55 ft 9 in (17 m) and a maximum speed of 350mph (560 kph). With a crew of 4 it could carry a bomb load of 8800 lbs (4000 kgs).

Dominie - losses
Used for: de Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide, de Havilland Dominie

The de Havilland Dominie was the military version of the 1930s civilian twin-engined biplane Dragon Rapide light airliner. The Dominie was used as a five or six seat navigation and radio trainer or a ten seat communications aeroplane. 521 Dominies were built and used by the RAF and Fleet Air Arm. It had a wingspan of 48 ft (14.5 m), a length of 34 ft 6 in (10.5 m) and a maximum speed of 157 mph (250 kph).

Fw 190
Used for: Focke-Wulf 190, Fw 190 Würger

The Focke-Wulf Fw 190 single seat fighter was designed by Kurt Tank and first flew in June 1939. It entered Luftwaffe service in June 1941 and over 20,000 were built. The Fw 190 was used as a fighter, fighter-bomber, night fighter and in a ground attack role. It was heavily engaged in defending against the American daylight bombing campaign. The Fw 190 had a wing span of 34 ft 5 in (10.5 m), a length of 29 ft 4 in (9 m) and its single radial engine gave it a maximum speed of 408 mph (657 kph). The later long-nosed Fw 190 version was 33 ft 11 in (10 m) long and had a maximum speed of 453 mph (729 kph).

Halifax  - losses
Used for: Handley Page Halifax

The Halifax was one of the mainstays of RAF Bomber Command. Designed by Handley Page the four engined Halifax became operational in March 1941.  6178 were built. Early Halifaxes had Merlin engines but performance was improved from August 1943 by using Hercules radial engines. 76 squadrons flew Halifaxes, predominantly in 4 Group and 6 Group. Halifaxes were also used for airborne operations and in Coastal Command. With a crew of seven the Halifax Mk 3 had a wing span of 104 ft 2 in (32 m) and a length of 71 ft 7 in (22 m). It had a maximum speed of 282 mph (454 kph), a cruising speed of 215 mph (346 kph) and a range of 1030 miles (1658 km) with the maximum bomb load of 13000 lbs (5900 kgs).

Halifax Mk 1
Used for: Halifax Mk. 1, Halifax Mk 1, Halifax Mk I, Halifax Mark 1

The Halifax Mk 1 entered service with 35 Squadron and 76 Squadron with the first operation in March 1941. Slow production and teething problems limited their use and only 84 Mk 1s were built. The Halifax Mk 1 was declared obsolete in June 1944. Carrying a crew of seven the Halifax Mk 1 had a wing span of 98 ft 8 in (30 m) and a length of 69 ft 9 in. (21 m). With four Merlin engines it had a maximum speed of 265 mph (426 kph) and a range of 850 miles (1368 km) with the maximum bomb load of 13000 lbs (5900 kgs). Defence was provided by nose and tail turrets supplemented by beam guns, although later Mk 1s had mid-upper turrets.

Halifax Mk 2
Used for: Halifax Mk. 2, Halifax Mk 2, Halifax Mk II, Halifax Mark 2

The Halifax Mk 2 differed from the Mk 1 by having more powerful Merlin engines and a mid upper turret. It entered service in October 1941 and 1977 were built. Later versions of the Mk 2 had larger fins and rudders. 904 aircraft identical to the Mk 2  except for different landing gear were designated Halifax Mk 5. Merlin engined Halifaxes were withdrawn from operations over Germany in February 1944. Carrying a crew of seven the Halifax Mk 2 had a wing span of 98 ft 8 in (30 m), a length of 71 ft 7 in (22 m) and a maximum bomb load of 13000 lbs (5900 kgs). Defence was provided by nose, mid-upper and tail turrets although late Mk 2s had the nose turret replaced by a perspex nose.

Halifax Mk 3
Used for: Halifax Mk. 3, Halifax Mk 3, Halifax Mk III, Halifax Mark 3

The Halifax Mk 3 was the most successful version and 2091 were built. The use of four Hercules radial engines and an increased wing span resulted in a significant improvement in performance. The Mk 3 entered service in August 1943 and was mainly used in 4 Group and 6 Group. Minor variants became the Halifax Mk 6 and Halifax Mk 7 of which 473 and 404 were built respectively. With a crew of seven the Halifax Mk 3 had a wing span of 104 ft 2 in (32 m) and a length of 71 ft 7 in (22 m). It had a maximum speed of 282 mph (454 kph), a cruising speed of 215 mph (346 kph) and a range of 1030 miles (1658 km) with the maximum bomb load of 13000 lbs (5900 kgs). Defence was provided by mid-upper and tail turrets and a gun in the perspex nose. 

Hamilcar
Used for: General Aircraft Limited GAL. 49

The Hamilcar was the largest glider used by the Allies during the war. It had a crew of two and was designed to carry heavy freight into the landing zone of airborne operations; it could carry a 7 ton tank. It was towed by Halifaxes or Stirlings. Over 400 were built and it was used during the Normandy and Arnhem campaigns. It had a wingspan of 110 ft (33.5 m) and a length of 68 ft (21 m). Towing speed was 150 mph (240 kph).

Hampden - losses
Used for: Handley Page Hampden

The Handley Page Hampden was a twin-engined medium bomber. First flown in 1936 it entered RAF Bomber Command service in 1938 with 49 Squadron. 5 Group became an all Hampden group in the early years of the war and Hampdens equipped 14 Bomber Command squadrons. It was withdrawn from bombing operations in September 1942 but continued serving with Coastal Command as a torpedo-bomber. 1433 Hampdens were built. With a crew of 4 the Hampden had a wing span of 69 ft 2 in (21 m) and a length of 53 ft 7 in (16 m). It had a top speed of 265 mph (426 kph), a cruising speed of 167 mph (269 kph) and could carry a maximum bomb load of 4000 lb (1814 kgs).

Harrow
Used for: Handley Page H.P.54 Harrow

The Handley Page Harrow was a twin-engined, high winged aeroplane that entered RAF service in 1937 as a bomber, although it had originally been designed as a transport aeroplane. By the start of the war it had been superseded as a bomber and reverted to its original transport role. It had a wingspan of 88 ft 5 in (27 m) and a length of 82 ft 2 in (25 m). With a crew of 5 it had a maximum speed of 200 mph (320 kph), a range of 1250 miles (2000 kms) and a bomb load of 3000 lb (1360 kgs).

Harvard 
Used for: North American T-6 Texan

The Harvard was the RAF version of the two-seat North American advanced trainer. Over 5100 Harvards served in the RAF from 1938 to 1955 in Britain, Canada and Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). It had a wingspan of 42 ft (13 m) and a length of 29 ft (m). Its single radial engine gave it a maximum speed of 205 mph (330 kph).

He 111
Used for: Heinkel 111

The Heinkel He 111 was a twin-engined medium bomber used by the Luftwaffe. It entered service in 1936 and was used throughout the war although production stopped in 1944. More than 6500 were built. It was also used as a torpedo bomber and a paratroop carrier. It had a crew of five, a wingspan of 74 ft 1 in (22.5 m) and a length of 54 ft 6 in (16.5 m). It could carry up to 5500 lbs (2500 kgs) of bombs, had a maximum speed of 258 mph (415 kph) and it had a range of 1740 miles.


Hornet Moth
Used for: de Havilland DH.87 Hornet Moth

The de Havilland Hornet Moth was a civil two-seat bi-plane tourer and trainer first flown in May 1934. 165 were built and many were used by the RAF during World War Two in liaison and communications roles. It had a Gipsy Moth Major engine, a wingspan of 31 ft 11 in (10 m) and a length of 25 ft (7.5 m). A cruising speed of 105 mph (170 kph) gave a range of 620 miles (1000 kms).

Horsa
Used for: Airspeed AS.51 Horsa

The Airspeed Horsa was a military glider with a crew of two capable of carrying up to 25 troops for Allied airborne operations. It was first used in 1943 for the invasion of Sicily and subsequently used in the Normandy, Arnhem and Rhine crossing campaigns. It had a wingspan of 88 ft (27 m), a length of 67 ft (20 m) and a gliding speed of 100 mph (160 kph).

Hudson - losses
Used for: Lockheed Hudson

The Hudson was the military version of an American Lockheed civilian airliner. Built to British specifications 800 Hudsons were purchased before later Lend-Lease arrangements increased the total of RAF Hudsons to 1890.  It entered RAF service in 1939 and was a twin-engined maritime patrol, anti-submarine and general reconnaissance aircraft serving mainly in Coastal Command and the Far East. It had a wing span of 65 ft 6 in (20 m) and length of 44 ft 4 in. (13.5 m). With a crew of 5 it had a top speed of 253 mph (407 kph), a range of 2800 miles (4506 km) and could carry 1000 lb of bombs (454 kgs).

Hurricane - losses
Used for: Hawker Hurricane

The Hawker Hurricane was a single seat day fighter. Designed by Sydney Camm it first flew in late 1935 and entered service in RAF Fighter Command in 1937. It was the most numerous RAF fighter in the 1940 Battle of Britain during which it equipped 32 squadrons. The Hurricane also saw service in North Africa, Malta and the Far East and fulfilled other roles including night fighter, fighter-bomber, anti-tank and convoy protection. 14,533 were built. Wing span was 40 ft (12 m) and length 32 ft (10 m). The single Merlin engine gave it a top speed of 339 mph (545 kph) and it was armed with 8 x .303 machine guns or 4 x 20 mm guns. It could also carry 2 x 500 lb (227 kgs) bombs.

Ju 52
Used for: Tante Ju, Iron Annie

The Junkers Ju 52 was a transport aircraft used by the Luftwaffe throughout the war. 3500 were built up to 1944. It first entered service as a bomber in 1932 but was superseded in that role and was reassigned a transport role in which it could carry 18 paratroopers. It had three radial engines; one in the nose and one on each wing with a top speed of 165 mph (265 kph). It had a wingspan of 95 ft 10 in (29 m), a length of 62 ft (19 m) and a range of 800 miles (1300 kms).

Ju 86
Used for: Junkers 86, Junkers Ju 86

The Junkers Ju 86 was a German twin-engined 1930s civilian airliner, with a capacity for ten passengers. It was also used as a military high altitude bomber and reconnaissance aircraft. About 900 were built. Original performance as a Luftwaffe standard bomber was disappointing but it was adapted with a pressurised cabin and used at high altitudes up to 49,000 feet. It was withdrawn from service in 1943. It had a crew of two, a wingspan of 105 ft (32 m), a length of 54 ft (16.5 m) and a maximum speed of 260 mph (420 kph).

Ju 87
Used for: Junkers 87, Stuka, dive-bomber

The Junkers Ju 87 was also known as the Stuka. It was a single-engined, two-seat dive bomber used by the Luftwaffe. It first flew in late 1935 and by the end of production in late 1944 about 5000 had been built. It had distinctive inverted cranked wings with a span of 45 ft 3 in (14 m) and a length of 37 ft 9 in (11.5 m). Maximum speed was 255 mph (410 kph) and armament comprised two 7.9 mm machine guns in the wings and one in the rear cockpit. It carried up to 3960 lbs (1800 kgs) of bombs or underwing cannons in an anti-tank role.

Ju 88
Used for: Junkers Ju 88, Junkers 88

Originally conceived as a twin-engined high speed medium bomber the Junkers Ju 88 first flew in December 1936. By 1945 more than 15,000 had been built for the Luftwaffe.  Over 9,000 were bombers but 6,000 were also built for other roles including night fighters. The main bomber version carried a crew of four, had a top speed of 293 mph (472 kph) and a maximum bomb load of 5510 lbs (2500 kgs). Night fighter versions carried a crew of three or four. It had a wingspan of 65 ft 11 in (20 m), a length of 51 ft 2 in (15.5 m) and a maximum speed of 389 mph (626 kph). Armament included upward facing cannons known as Schräge Musik used to attack RAF Bomber Command aircraft from underneath.

Ju 352
Used for: Junkers Ju 352 Herkules

The Junkers Ju 352 ‘Herkules’ Luftwaffe transport aircraft was designed to replace the Ju 52. The Ju 352 first flew in 1943 but only 50 were built. It had a similar three-radial engine layout to the Ju 52 with one in the nose and one on each wing. With a crew of three or four the Ju 352 had a wing span of 112 ft 2 in (34 m), a length of 80 ft 8 in (24.5 m) and a maximum speed of 230 mph (370 kph).

Lancaster - losses
Used for: Avro Lancaster, Lanc

Designed by Roy Chadwick, the four engine Lancaster became the predominant heavy bomber used by RAF Bomber Command in the Second World War. It first flew on 9 January 1941 and became operational on 3 March 1942. Between then and May 1945 Lancasters dropped two-thirds of the total Bomber Command tonnage. 7377 Lancasters were built, most powered by Rolls Royce Merlin engines. Two remain flying. With a crew of seven, it had a wing span of 102 ft (31 m) and a length of 69 ft 6 inches (21 m). It had a maximum speed of 275 mph (442 kph), a cruising speed of 200 mph (321 kph) and a maximum range of 2350 miles (3781 km). The normal maximum bomb load was 18,000 lb (8168 kg) but modified Lancasters could carry the 22,000 lb (9979 kg) Grand Slam bomb.

Lancaster Mk 1
Used for: Lancaster Mk. 1, Lancaster Mk 1, Lancaster Mk I, Lancaster Mark 1

Lancaster Mk 1s had four British Rolls Royce Merlin engines. The only difference between the Lancaster Mk 1 and the Lancaster Mk 3 was that the latter were powered by American built Packard Merlins. There are many cases of Mk 1s becoming Mk 3s by engine changes and vice versa with some having both engine types simultaneously. 3,425 Lancaster Mk 1s were built. Carrying a crew of seven it had a wing span of 102 ft (31 m) and a length of 69 ft 6 in. (21 m). It had a maximum speed of 275 mph (442 kph), a cruising speed of 200 mph (321 kph) and a maximum range of 2350 miles (3781 km). Defensive armament was provided by nose, mid-upper and tail turrets. The normal maximum bomb load was 18,000 lb (8168 kg).

Lancaster Mk 2
Used for: Lancaster Mk. 2, Lancaster Mk 2, Lancaster Mk II, Lancaster Mark 2

The Lancaster Mk 2 was ordered to meet the expected shortage of Merlin engines instead of which they had four Bristol Hercules radial engines. The anticipated shortage of Merlins did not materialise so only 300 Lancaster Mk 2s were built. They served mainly in some squadrons of 6 Group where the same engines were also used in their Halifaxes. Carrying a crew of seven the Lancaster Mk 2 had a wing span of 102 ft (31 m) and a length of 69 ft 6 in (21 m). It had a maximum speed of 270 mph (435 kph), a cruising speed of 200 mph (321 kph) and a maximum range of 2350 miles (3781 km). Defensive armament was provided by nose, mid-upper and tail turrets. In addition a ventral turret was standard on the Mk 2s, unlike most other Lancasters.

Lancaster Mk 3
Used for: Lancaster Mk. 3, Lancaster Mk 3, Lancaster Mk III, Lancaster Mark 3

Lancaster Mk 3s had four American built Packard Merlin engines. The only difference between the Lancaster Mk 3 and the Lancaster Mk 1 was that the latter were powered by British Rolls Royce Merlins. There are many cases of Mk 3s becoming Mk 1s by engine changes and vice versa with some having both engine types simultaneously. 3,039 Lancaster Mk 3s were built. Carrying a crew of seven it had a wing span of 102 ft (31 m) and a length of 69 ft 6 in (21 m). It had a maximum speed of 275 mph (442 kph), a cruising speed of 200 mph (321 kph) and a maximum range of 2350 miles (3781 km). The normal maximum bomb load was 18,000 lb (8168 kg). Defensive armament was provided by nose, mid-upper and tail turrets.

Lancastrian
Used for: Avro 691 Lancastrian

The Lancastrian was the transport version of the Lancaster bomber. It was used by civilian airlines and had a capacity for 9-13 passengers. It first went into service in February 1945. RAF Transport Command used 32 Lancastrians and they took part in the 1948-49 Berlin airlift. Lancastrians were also used for in-flight refuelling trials and as jet engine test beds. It had a wingspan of 102 ft (31 m) and a length of 76 ft 10 in (23 m). Four Merlin engines gave it a top speed of 310 mph (500 kph).

Lincoln
Used for: Avro Type 694, Avro Lincoln

Designed by Roy Chadwick to replace the Lancaster the Avro Lincoln became RAF Bomber Command's last British built piston-engined heavy bomber. With a crew of seven it had a wingspan of 120 ft (36.5 m) span and a length of 78 ft 3in (24 m). Four Packard Merlin engines gave it a maximum speed of 305 mph (490 kph) and a cruising speed of 244 mph (393 kph). It had a range of 2,800 miles (4506 kms) with a 14,000lb (6350 kgs) bomb load, although it could carry up to 22,000lb (9979 kgs). First flown in June 1944 the Lincoln entered service in August 1945 and equipped 24 squadrons. It was withdrawn from frontline duties in 1955. 624 Lincolns were built.

Lysander - losses
Used for: Westland Lysander

The Lysander was a single-engined, high-winged army co-operation aircraft with the ability for short take-offs and landings from grass fields. It entered service in 1938 but by 1942 had been replaced in its original role. However it found other roles such as target towing and air-sea rescue. It was also used by RAF Bomber Command in a Special Duties role in supporting resistance groups in Occupied Europe by landing and picking up agents. 1593 were built. It had a wingspan of 50 ft (15 m) and a length of 30 ft 6 in (9 m). With a crew of two it had a maximum speed of 219 mph (350 kph) and a normal range of 600 miles (965 kms). It had two .303 machine guns and could also carry light bombs or supply canisters.

Magister - losses
Used for: Miles M.14 Magister

The Miles Magister was the RAF’s first monoplane elementary trainer. It had two seats, a single engine and entered service in September 1937. Over 1200 were built and it remained in use throughout the war. It had a wingspan of 33 ft 10 in (10 m), a length of 24 ft 8 in (7 m) and a maximum speed of 142 mph (229 kph).

Manchester - losses
Used for: Avro Manchester

The Avro Manchester was a twin-engined heavy bomber. First flown in 1939 it became operational with 207 Squadron in February 1941 and served with seven squadrons in 5 Group. With a crew of 7 it had a wing span of 90 ft (27.5 m) and length of 68 ft 10 in (21 m). Maximum speed was 265 mph (426 kph) and it had a range of 1200 miles (1931 kms) with its maximum bomb load of 10,350 lb (4695 kgs). The Vulture engines gave persistent problems and of the initial order for 200 only 157 were built as Manchesters; the remainder were constructed as the four-engined Lancaster. The Manchester was withdrawn from operations in June 1942 and some served in Heavy Conversion Units until late 1943.

Martinet - losses
Used for: Miles M.25 Martinet

The Miles Martinet was designed as a target-tug for air-gunnery and anti-aircraft gunnery training. The Martinet was based on the Miles Master advanced trainer and first flew in April 1942. 1,793 were built and some Martinets were also used for air-sea rescue duties. With a crew of two the Martinet had a single radial engine giving it a maximum speed of 240 mph (386 kph). It had a wingspan of 39 ft (12 m) and a length of 30 ft 11 in (9.5 m). In 1943 a pilotless radio-controlled version known as the Queen Martinet was developed, of which 67 were built.

Me 109
Used for: Messerschmitt Bf 109

The Me 109 was designed by Willy Messerschmitt and 33,984 were built; the most ever produced single seat fighter. It first flew in September 1935 and the Me 109E was the most common Luftwaffe version during the first three years of World War Two. From 1942 the Me 109G became the main type and more were built than all other versions put together. It had a wing span of 32 ft 7 in (10 m) and a length of 29 ft 4 in (9 m). Powered by a single Daimler-Benz engine it had a top speed of 398 mph (640 kph). The Me 109 was also used as a night-fighter using ‘Wild Boar’ tactics against RAF Bomber Command aircraft.

Me 110
Used for: Messerschmitt Bf 110

The Me 110 was conceived as a twin engined long range escort day fighter for the Luftwaffe. First flown in May 1936 it succeeded in the early German campaigns of World War Two but later suffered heavy losses. It was used in other roles, notably as a radar equipped night fighter. With a crew of three it had a wingspan of 53 ft 5 in (16 m), a length of 41 ft 6 in (12.5 m) and a maximum speed of 342 mph (550 kph). Armament included upward facing cannons known as Schräge Musik used to attack RAF Bomber Command aircraft from underneath. 6170 were built.

Me 163
Used for: Messerschmitt 163, Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet

The Me 163 was a tailless, rocket-powered single seat interceptor. It first flew in 1941 but only entered Luftwaffe service in mid 1944 when it was deployed to defend against Allied daylight bombers. It had a sweptback wingspan of 30 ft 7 in (9 m) and a length of 18 ft 8 in. (5.5 m). Powered by a liquid rocket motor it had a speed of 596 mph (959 kph) but an endurance of only ten minutes. More Me 163s exploded on landing than were lost on operations. About 350 were built.

Me 262
Used for: Messerschmitt 262, Messerschmitt Me 262, Me 262 Schwalbe, Me 262 Schwalbe/ Sturmvogel

The Me 262 was the Luftwaffe’s first operational jet fighter. First flown in 1942 it became operational in October 1944 and used to attack Allied daylight bombers. The single seat Me 262 had a wing span of 41 ft (12.5 m) and a length of 34 ft 10 in (10.5m). Powered by two turbojet engines it had a top speed of 542 mph (872 kph). Over 1400 were built but only about 200 were operational at any one time.

Me 410
Used for: Messerschmitt Me 410 Hornisse

The Messerschmitt Me 410 was a twin-engined fighter-bomber and reconnaissance aircraft. It was developed from the unsuccessful Me 210 and entered Luftwaffe service in 1943. 1913 were built. It had a crew of two, a wingspan of 53 ft 8 in (16 m), a length of 41 ft (12.5 m) and a maximum speed of 388 mph (624 kph), Armament comprised a mix of cannons, machine guns and up to 4400 lbs (2000 kgs) of bombs.

Meteor
Used for: Gloster Meteor

The Gloster Meteor was the only Allied jet aircraft to see operational service during World War Two. It first flew in March 1943 and entered RAF service in July 1944. The Meteor Mk 1, with Welland turbojets, was used to combat the V-1. In January 1945 the Mk 3, with Derwent turbojets, was deployed in Europe with the Second Tactical Air Force. It had a wing span of 43 ft (13 m), a length of 41 ft 3 in (12.5 m) and a top speed of 493 mph (793 kph). It was armed with 4 x 20mm cannons. Post-war improved versions became the main RAF day interceptor and it was also used in night-fighter, reconnaissance and target-tug roles. It equipped 63 RAF squadrons and 3875 were built.


Mosquito - losses
Used for: Mossie, The Wooden Wonder

The de Havilland Mosquito was one of the most versatile aircraft of World War Two. Conceived as an unarmed day bomber it served in Bomber Command, Fighter Command and Coastal Command. 2 Group commenced low level daylight Mosquito bombing operations in May 1942 and 8 Group Pathfinders used them both as oboe equipped marker aircraft and in the Light Night Strike Force. 5 Group used them as markers and intruder Mosquitos operated with 100 Group in a bomber support role. 7781 were built. With a crew of two Mosquitos had a wing span of 54 ft 2 in (16.5 m) and length of 40 ft 6 in. (12 m). Two Merlin engines gave it a top speed of 415 mph (668 kph) and a maximum bomb load of 4000 lb (1814 kgs).

Oxford - losses
Used for: Airspeed Oxford, Airspeed AS.10

The Airspeed Oxford was the RAF’s first advanced monoplane twin engined trainer and entered service in November 1937. It could be configured to train pilots, navigators, bomb aimers, wireless operators and air gunners. Over 8500 Oxfords were built and it was used for aircrew training in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), the Middle East as well in the UK. With twin radial engines the Oxford had a span of 53 ft 4 in (16 m), a length of 34 ft 6 in (10.5 m), a top speed of 182 mph (293 kph) and a range of 550 miles (885 km).

P-38
Used for: P38, P-38 Lightning, Lockheed P-38 Lightning, P-38

The Lockheed P-38 was a single-seat, twin-engined, twin-boomed long distance escort fighter. It first flew in 1939 and about 10,000 were built. The P-38 operated in the Pacific and European theatres. In the latter it mainly provided escort duty for daylight Allied bombers. It was also used in reconnaissance and ground attack roles. Two seat versions were built for night fighting and bombing roles and it could carry 4000 lb (1814 kgs). Some were used in Bomber Command  100 Group for electronic intelligence gathering. The P-38 had a wingspan of 52 ft (16 m), a length of 37 ft 10 in (11.5 m) and a maximum speed of 414 mph (666 kph).

P-40
Used for: P40, P-40 Kittyhawk, Curtiss P-40

The Curtiss P-40 was a single seat, single-engined fighter and ground attack aircraft. Different versions were known by different names including Warhawk, Tomahawk and Kittyhawk. It first flew in October 1938 and by December 1944 over 14,000 P-40s had been built. Most were used by the United States Army Air Force but the RAF and Commonwealth air forces used 1065 Tomahawks and over 3000 Kittyhawks, especially in North Africa, the Mediterranean and Italy. The Kittyhawk had a wingspan of 37 ft 4 in (11 m), a length of 31 ft 2 in (9.5 m) and a maximum speed of 362 mph (583 kph). Armament comprised six 0.5 machine guns and up to 1000 lb of bombs (454 kgs).

P-47
Used for: Republic P-47 Thunderbolt

The P-47 was also known as the Thunderbolt and was the largest and heaviest single seat piston engined fighter ever built. First flown in May 1941 it entered service with the United States Army Air Force in April 1943, originally as a bomber escort but later in a ground attack role in the European theatre. The USAAF deployed P-47s in the Pacific theatre as did the RAF which operated them in 16 squadrons in the Far East. 15,660 P-47s were built. It had a wingspan of 40 ft 9 in (12 m), a length of 36 ft 2 in (11 m) and a top speed of 427 mph (687 kph). Armament comprised eight .5 machine guns and two 1000 lb (454 kgs) bombs or ten rockets.

P-51
Used for: P51, P-51 Mustang, North American Aviation P-51 Mustang

Designed to British specifications the North American P-51, also known as the Mustang, first flew in October 1940 with an Allison engine. From 1942 Merlin engines were used and the P-51 became a successful single seat, single-engined day fighter, long range bomber escort and ground attack aeroplane. Over 14,800 P-51s were built and were used by both the United States American Air Force and the RAF, which had more than 1100 of them. One P-51 was used for low level marking by 617 Squadron in Bomber Command. The P-51 had a wingspan of 37 ft (11 m) and a length of 32 ft 3 in (10 m). It had a maximum speed of 442 mph (711 kph) and a normal range of 1710 miles (2750 kms). Armament comprised four or six .50 machine guns and 2000 lbs (907 kgs) of bombs or ten rockets.

Proctor
Used for: Percival Proctor

The Percival Proctor was a single-engined communications and radio trainer aircraft. First flown in October 1939 over 1100 were built, most for the RAF but about 250 went to the Fleet Air Arm. Three-seat and four-seat versions were built. It had a wingspan of 39 ft 6 in (12 m), length of 28 ft 2 in (8.5 m) and a maximum speed of 160 mph (257 kph).

Shackleton
Used for: Avro Shackleton

The Avro Shackleton was developed from the Lincoln and used by RAF Coastal Command as a long range maritime reconnaissance, anti-submarine and airborne early warning aircraft. It first flew in 1949, entered RAF service in 1951 and finally retired in 1991. 183 were built. It had a crew of 10, a wingspan of 119 ft 10 in (36.5 m) and a length of 92 ft 6 in (28 m). With four Rolls Royce Griffon engines it had a maximum speed of 302 mph (486 kph) and a range of 3660 miles (5890 kms).

Spitfire - losses
Used for: Supermarine Spitfire, Spit 

The Supermarine Spitfire was the only Allied fighter to be in continuous production throughout World War Two. Principally a single-seat day fighter it flew in all theatres and was also used in fighter-bomber and reconnaissance roles. Designed by R.J. Mitchell it first flew in 1936 and was operated by 19 squadrons in RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain. Continuously improved it had either a single Merlin or, from 1943, Griffon engine. More than 20,300 Spitfires were built. The Spitfire Mk 5 was the most numerous variant which had a wing span of 36 ft 10 in (11 m) and a length of 29 ft 11 in (9 m). Maximum speed was 371 mph (597 kph) and it was typically armed with 4 x .303 machine guns and 2 x 20mm cannons.

Stearman
Used for: Stearman Model 75, PT-17

The Stearman was a single-engined biplane primary trainer used by the United States Army Air Force and the United States Navy during the 1930s and 1940s. Over 10,600 were built. It had a wingspan of 32 ft 2 in (10 m), a length of 24 ft 9 in (7.5 m) and a maximum speed of 124 mph (200 kph).

Stirling - losses
Used for: Short Stirling

The Short Stirling was the first four-engined bomber used by RAF Bomber Command. It entered service with 7 Squadron and became operational in February 1941. By mid 1943 it equipped twelve squadrons in 3 Group but had begun to be outperformed by Halifaxes and Lancasters. From 1944 it served in Transport Command as a glider tug and paratroop transporter and took part in the Normandy campaign as well as the Arnhem and Rhine campaigns. 2382 were built. With a crew of 7 it had a wing span of 99 ft (30 m) and a length of 87 ft 3 in (26.5 m). It had a maximum speed of 270 mph (435 kph) and a range of 740 miles (1190 kms) with its maximum bomb load of 14,000 lb (6350 kgs).

Stranraer
Used for: Supermarine Stranraer

The Stranraer was a general reconnaissance biplane flying boat used by RAF Coastal Command. Designed by R.J. Mitchell and built by Supermarine it first flew in July 1934. They were used in anti-submarine and convoy escort roles until April 1941 after which they were replaced by Sunderlands and Catalinas. The Stranraer had a crew of six and was powered by two Bristol Pegasus radial engines. These gave it a maximum speed of 165 mph (266 kph) and a range of 1,000 miles (1600 kms).  It had a wing span of 85 ft (26 m) and a length of 54 ft 10 in (16.5 m) . Armament comprised three machine guns and it could carry 1,000lb (450 kgs) of bombs.

Sunderland
Used for: Short S.25 Sunderland

The Short Sunderland was a long range maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine flying boat. It entered RAF Coastal Command service in 1938 and the last one retired in 1959. 749 were built. It had a wingspan of 112 ft 10 in (34 m), a length of 85 ft 4 in (26 m). Four radial engines gave it a maximum speed of 213 mph (340 kph) and it had a range of 2980 miles (4800 kms) at 134 mph (215 kph), with an endurance of 13.5 hours. With a crew of 13 it had nose, mid upper and tail turrets as well as beam gun positions. It could carry 2000 lb (900 kgs) of bombs or depth charges.

Swordfish
Used for: Fairey Swordfish, Stringbag

The Fairey Swordfish was a single-engined biplane used mainly as an aircraft carrier based torpedo bomber and reconnaissance aircraft. It first flew in 1934 and entered service in 1936 with the Fleet Air Arm. 2396 Swordfish were built and it equipped 25 squadrons. Swordfish were used in the attacks on the Italian Fleet in Taranto and on the Bismarck as well as in convoy protection and anti-submarine roles. With a crew of two or three the Swordfish had a single radial engine giving it a maximum speed of 138 mph (222 kph) and a range of 546 miles (880 kms). It had a wing span of 45 ft 6 in (14 m) and was 35 ft 8 in (11 m) long.

Tiger Moth - losses
Used for: de Havilland Tiger Moth, de Havilland DH.82

Designed by Geoffrey de Havilland the Tiger Moth became the standard basic two-seat trainer for the RAF from February 1932 and it remained in service until the early 1950s. Most World War Two RAF pilots received their initial flying training on Tiger Moths. It was the last bi-plane trainer in the RAF and had a wing span of 29 ft 4 in (9 m) and a length of 23 ft 11 in (7 m). With a 130 hp de Havilland Gypsy Major engine it had a top speed of 109 mph (175 kph). Over 8800 were built of which about 3000 were built in Canada, Australia and New Zealand as part of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. About 400 ‘Queen Bee’ radio controlled versions were built to provide gunnery target practice.

Typhoon - losses
Used for: Hawker Typhoon, Tiffy

The Hawker Typhoon was designed by Sydney Camm as a single seat fighter but it became an effective ground attack aircraft. It first flew in February 1940 but problems delayed production until 1941. With four 20mm cannons it was also capable of carrying 2,000 lb (907 kgs) in bombs or eight 60 lb (27 kgs) rockets.  In the Normandy campaign the Typhoon was operational in 26 squadrons of the Second Tactical Air Force attacking radar stations, road and rail targets as well as tanks. With a Napier Sabre engine the Typhoon was capable of 412 mph (663 kph). It had a wing span of 41 ft 7 in (12.5 m) and a length of 31 ft 11 in (10 m). 3,300 Typhoons were built.

Ventura - losses
Used for: Lockheed Ventura

The Lockheed Ventura entered service in 1942 as a light bomber with a crew of five. It was used by 2 Group in RAF Bomber Command until September 1943. It also served in Coastal Command as a general reconnaissance aircraft. In total 394 Venturas saw RAF service. It had a wingspan of 65 ft 6 in (20 m), a length of 51 ft 2 in (15.5 m). Twin radial engines gave it a maximum speed of 300 mph (483 kph) and it could carry a bomb load of 2500 lb (1134 kgs).

Walrus
Used for: Supermarine Walrus

The Supermarine Walrus was designed by R.J. Mitchell as an amphibious reconnaissance aircraft. It was a biplane with a single radial engine in ‘pusher’ configuration. It first flew in June 1933 and entered Fleet Air Arm Service in July 1936. The Walrus served on board warships in convoy patrol and anti-submarine roles. It also flew with RAF Coastal Command in an Air-Sea Rescue role. The Walrus had a wing span of 45 ft 10 in (14 m) and a length of 37 ft 7 in (11.5 m). With a crew of four it had a top speed of 135 mph (217 kph) and a range of 600 miles (965 kms). 740 were built.

Wellington - losses
Used for: Vickers Wellington

The Wellington twin-engined medium bomber was the mainstay of the early years of the RAF Bomber Command strategic bombing campaign. It first flew in 1936 and was built by Vickers using geodetic construction invented by Barnes Wallis. 3 Group was initially equipped with Wellingtons and by late 1941 it served 21 squadrons in Bomber Command. Its last Bomber Command operation was in October 1943 but it continued to operate in the Mid and Far East as well as  in Coastal Command. 11,461 Wellingtons were built. With a crew of six the Wellington Mk 3 had a wing span of 86 ft (26 m), length of 61 ft (18.5 m). It had a maximum speed of 255 mph (410 kph) and a range of 1540 miles (2478 km) with its maximum bomb load of 4500 lb (2040 kg).

Whitley - losses
Used for: Armstrong Whitworth Whitley

The Whitley was a twin engined bomber, designed by John Lloyd and built by Armstrong Whitworth. It first flew in March 1936 and entered RAF Bomber Command service in March 1937. At that time it was classified as a heavy bomber and became the standard aircraft in 4 Group. It was withdrawn from main force bombing operations in June 1942. Whitleys were also used by Coastal Command and Transport Command. 1814 Whitleys were built, most of which had Merlin engines. It flew with a distinctive nose-down attitude and a crew of five. The Whitley had a wingspan of 84 ft (25.5 m), a length of 70 ft 6 in (21.5 m), a maximum speed of 230 mph (370 kph) and a cruising speed of 210 mph (338 kph). Maximum bomb load was 7,375 lbs (3345 kgs) and normal range was 1500 miles (2414 kms).

Yale
Used for: North American NA-64, NA-64

The North American Yale was a two-seat, single-engined advanced trainer and a predecessor of the Harvard. The Yale first flew in February 1940 and 230 were built. They were built for France and about 111 had been delivered by the fall of France. The remainder were used in Canada as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. It had a wingspan of 40 ft 1 in (12 m), a length of 28 ft 4 in (8.5 m) and a maximum speed of 166 mph (267 kph).

York
Used for: Avro York

The Avro York was designed by Roy Chadwick. It used the same wings, landing gear and four engines as the Lancaster but had a redesigned fuselage and tail unit. It first flew in 1942 and was used as a VIP transport for Winston Churchill and King George VI. Wartime production was slow but post-war it served in nine RAF Transport Command squadrons and participated in the 1948-49 Berlin airlift. 257 were built. Wing span was 102 ft (31 m) and length was 78 ft 6 in (24 m). It had a cruising speed of 233 mph (375 kph) and a range of 2700 miles (4345 km). With a crew of five it could carry 24 passengers or up to 10,000 lb (4536 kgs) of freight.