Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. Two

STyrieJSB87636v2.2.pdf

Title

Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. Two

Description

A wartime log kept by Jim Tyrie. He lists his crew on the night they were shot down over Berlin, the construction of tin trays, addresses of co-prisoners, cartoons, London restaurants, newspaper cuttings in German and English and finally more detailed notes as the Russian offensive of 1945 got closer.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Contributor

Tricia Marshall
David Bloomfield

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

One handwritten book.

Language

Identifier

STyrieJSB87636v2

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

[lion crest]

A WARTIME LOG

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

A WARTIME LOG

FOR

BRITISH PRISONERS

Gift from

THE WAR PRISONERS’ AID OF THE Y.M.C.A.

27, Quai Wilson

GENEVA – SWITZERLAND

[page break]

[blank page]

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[lion crest]

THIS BOOK BELONGS TO

JAMES S.B. TYRIE F/L

STALAG LUFT 3

BELARIA

[symbol]

P.T.O.

P.O.W. NO. 530

[YMCA crest]

[page break]

[underlined] CHANGE OF CAMP. [/underlined]

STALAG 3A (OFLAG) LUCKENWALDE

[page break]

CONTENTS

Page

ARRIVAL IN GERMANY 1 – 3

KLIM TIN DISHES 4 – 5

ADDRESSES 9 – 15, – 33 [brackets] RESTAURANTS ETC. 31 – 2

CARTOONS 21 – 25 CLUBS ETC. 27 – 28

DAY’S MENU (HOME) 37 – 39 BRIDGE GAME 29

ROLEX 58 ITALIAN CENSORS 59

G. ARTICLE (BOMBING) 62 – 67 GERM. CARTOON 60

PAROLE CARD 68 – 69 INVASION HEADLINE 61

WALKS (BELARIA) 70 – 71 GERM. CARTOON 72

GERMAN CAMP MONEY 76 LETTER FROM COMM 74

GERM FIGHTER CLAIMS 78 – 82 EXAM PASS 75

GERM. POSTER ON ESCAPE 84 – 87 CHEQUES 83, 92

JAP CARTOONS (V.B.) 89 – 90 CARTOON 88

1944 – 1945 XMAS MENU 93 GERM POSTER 94

MOVE FROM BELARIA 98 –

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[lion crest] 1 [lion crest]

SGT. LEE. 1st PILOT.

SELF 2nd “

SGT. YOUNG OBSERVER

SGT. BUDD WIRELESS-OPERATOR

SGT. HULL REAR GUNNER

10-4-41

[underlined] FAMOUS LAST WORDS. [/underlined]

SGT. BUDD: “DO YOU KNOW THE PORT ENGINE IS ON FIRE?”

[underlined] TARGET. [/underlined] RAILWAY STATION IN E. BERLIN.

NO. OF A/C TAKING PART. 98

NO. OF A/C LOST 10

HIT BY FLAK OVER TARGET & SET ON FIRE. SGT. YOUNG WOUNDED IN LEG. HEADED N. FOR SWEDEN, BUT

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2

FORCED TO ABANDON A/C 15 MINS LATER. BAILED OUT AND LANDED IN GARDEN OF HOUSE IN BERNAU. FOLLOWED DOWN BY SEARCHLIGHTS & CAUGHT IMMEDIATELY ON LANDING. TAKEN TO POLICE STATION, WHERE, MIDST MUCH NOISE & CHAOS, YOUNG’S LEG WAS BANDAGED BY ELDERLY V.A.D. LADY. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALL AND SUNDRY.

TAKEN NEXT TO FLAK SCHOOL CELLS. LATER INTERROGATED AND SPENT NIGHT IN CELL. NEXT MORNING, COMPLAINED TO VISITING LUFTWAFFE OFFICERS OF POOR BREAKFAST. REWARDED BY WHITE BREAD, JAM &

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3

SOME JELLIED MEAT. ALSO PERMITTED TO VISIT FREELY REST OF CREW.

ABOUT 10 AM. PROCEEDED IN WAGON TO BERLIN, ANHALTER RLY. STATION, WHERE WE CAUGHT TRAIN FOR FRANKFURT-ON-MAIN AND DULAG LUFT. ARRIVED ABOUT MIDNIGHT AT COOLER.

INTERROGATED AND SEARCHED NEXT MORNING, AND ALLOWED INTO MAIN CAMP IN THE AFTERNOON

[symbol]

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4

[underlined] KLIM TIN TRAYS. [/underlined]

Made a total of 6 for mess at Belaria, quite successful.

[drawing of work bench and tin]

Start by cutting off bottom of tin with table knife. Then by laying the tin flattened out along the crack in stool, cut off ragged edges, and get uniform lengths. Also cut out strips 1 inch wide.

[drawing of flattened tin]

The edges of big sheets are folded over in 1/4" flanges, ditto with small binders Then all sheets are joined together to form a large flat plate [symbol]

[symbol]

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5

[drawing of flattened tin] which looks something like the above rough sketch. The joints are firm by hammered down and the sheet is folded into a tray according to depth required.

[drawing of box shape] The ends are folded round, it being arranged that there is an over lap at narrow ends to hold corner flaps in place. Similarly a flap in left along sides and a thin strip put on to strengthen.

[drawing of KLIM box]

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6

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7

[cartoon drawing of officer sitting at table]

“HEBREWS: 13. V. 8

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8

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9

Jimmy Anderson, 3 Arkley Pl. Dundee

Bill Amos, 122 Alexandra Rd. Clayfield Brisbane. M3595

K.H. Anthony, 90 Queensbury Av. Toronto 13 Grover 811

Betty Bowles, Hever Farm, Singlewell, Kent

Mrs. Brough, 15 Maryfield Terr., Dundee

Dorothy Bates, 104 Ledbury Rd. (B.F.) Bayswater, W11

Mrs D. Brough, 7100 Staedman Av. Dearborn Michigan

Mrs. Morris Baldwin, 338 Highland, Wyandotte, Michigan.

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce, 2511, 23rd. Street, Wyandotte, Michigan.

R.P. Baines, 3 Cambridge St. N. Brighton 5. 6 Melbourne. X3058

Robin Buchanan, Stoneham, Helensburgh

Geo. Combe, 2 Tayview Terrace, E. Newport

Mr. & Mrs. Callow, 11 The Green, St. Leonards

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10

S/L C.N.S. Campbell, 4, Meadway, Little Thurrock, Grays, Essex.

OSR. Collett, Pulham Market, Diss, Norfolk

A.T. Davidson, 43 Kings Road, East Sheen, London SW.

Mrs. G.W. Dagwell, 6 Torr View Ave. Peverell, Plymouth.

Mr & Mrs Elder, Bruce Terrace, Errol.

Mrs Elliott, 63 Loans Road, Dundee

Ted Edwards, 1, Filey Road, Newport, Mon. S. Wales.

Miss Pauline Elliott-Beevor, 16 Hyde Park Gardens, London, W2

2/L David Farrell, 430 Junipers, Long Beach, California. 3 – 2928

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11

Val Galloway, 190 Arbroath Rd. Dundee

Chris. Gordon, 11 Cardean St. Dundee

OH Grunke, 1543 York Ave. New York

Harry Goodwin, 150 Wightman Road, Hornsey London N. 8 MOV 6448

Douglas Hill, Dalgleish Road, Dundee

Pat Hamblin,

Baroness H. van Heickeren, (Rote Kreug) de Steeg, Holland.

Helen Harle, 3 Commercial Road, Spittal B. on Tweed.

Jack Hynd, 68 Forfar Road, Dundee

Lt. Carl Holmstrom, Sherwood St., Branaford, Conneticut. [sic]

Mrs. J. Johnston, 445 Riverbank, Wyandotte, Michigan.

Joan Kelson, 4 Severn Drive, Thornbury, nr. Bristol

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12

Mrs. Thomas Kenworthy, Glenside, Pennsylvania

Grethe Kavli, Eilerts Sunds Gt. 2 Oslo, Norway.

Margaret Lemmens, R.N.O. Hospital Gt Portland St. London W1

Mrs. Harry Locker, 156 First Street, Wyandotte, Michigan.

Mrs. Lasseter, Missippi, [symbol] Morton.

Mrs. J. Morris, 90 Beech Road, Clevelys Lancs.

Bruce Mackenzie, c/o Mrs. E.G. Twyanan 990 Erin St. Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Mrs. McKechnie, Trafalgar Apts. Cote de Leige Road, Montreal.

Lt. Bill Moses, c/o Jules Club, Jermyn St. London.

1705 Wayne Avenue, South Pasadena, California

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13

Padre MacDonald, Parish House, Portree, Sky

Miss Ethel Newman, 9440 Savery, Detroit, Michigan.

K.W. Mackenzie, Lakeview, Enniskillen, N. Ireland.

Miss Jean Nicholas, 49 Leith Ave., Portchester, Fareham, Hants.

Alice Partington, 80 Friendship St. Bolivar, New York.

Miss Emily Price, c/o Landes Bros. 130 W 30th St. New York.

Fred Randall, 127 Ferry Road, Dundee

Pat Roper, 134 Hurst St. Cowley Rd. Oxford.

Anne Reid, Greenwich, Conneticut. [sic] P.O.B. 427

Tich Read, Fairfield, Hill Lane, Ruislip Middsx.

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14

Gladys Richardson, 79, Moreland St. London E.C.

Sandy Shepherd, 8 Lochlee Terrace, Dundee.

Isla Stewart, 70 Dalkeith Road, Dundee.

Joan Scott. Ashgrove, Low Utley, nr. Keighley, Yorks.

[symbol] Ethel Sheldrake, 36 Alleyn Road, West Dulwich, London SE21

Sam Small, P.O. Box 999, Durban.

[symbol] Always thro. Mrs Pick, Woodhouse Field Thirsk.

R.D. Shuman, Statesboro, Georgia

Joyce Tillbrook, 45 Wroughton Rd. London S.W.11

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15

Eve Vere, “Peacehaven” Tavistock Rd. Roborough, Devon.

Eve Wheeldon, 12 Colwick Rd. West Bridgeford, Nottingham.

Mrs. Alex. Wann, 51 Vinton St. Dorchester, Mass.

Lt. Rathbone, Lincoln, Nebraska. (Geologist)

Jack F.M. White, 82 Parkland Grove, Ashford, Middsx. 2455 (Germ. Class)

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16

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17

An extract from “All Souls’ Night”, a collection of short stories by Hugh Walpole. It sums up very well the situation which so often arises in camps between friends.

“The perfect travelling companion! Isn’t he or she practically an impossibility? As with marriage you may compromise, and nine out of ten times you do. Is it your fault or the others? Surely not your own, for you start out with such splendid confidence as to your own character. And, to the very last, it isn’t your own character that seems to have failed. Aside from one or two little irritabilities you have been perfect, but the other - ! You had no idea before you started of the weaknesses, the selfishness, the odd, exasperating tricks, the refusal to agree to the most obvious course, the insistence on unimportant personal rights! No, it has most certainly [underlined] not [/underlined] been your fault; and yet, in retrospect, are there not suddenly exposed certain flecks, little blemishes in your own personality, that you had never suspected.”

[symbol]

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20

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21

“HAPPY DAYS”

[eight cartoon drawings of life in camp]

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22

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23

“HAPPY DAYS”

[eight cartoon drawings of life in camp]

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24

[blank page]

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25

[nine cartoon drawings of life in camp]

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26

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27

[underlined] CLUBS [/underlined]

1. MURRAYS

2. TATTY BOGLE

3. GAY 90’s

4. TUDOR & CROCKER

5. BLUE PENCIL

6. HAVANNA

7. CHEZ NO 1

8. R.A.F.

9. OVERSEAS

10. CAFE DE PARIS

11. L.’ APERATIF [sic]

12. UNIVERSAL

13. CAPTAINS CABIN

14. PUNCHBOWL

15. BELLE VUE

16. ORANGE

17. QUEENS

18. CAFÉ ANGLAIS

19. AMER. EAGLE

20. N.Z. FORCES

21. BINNYS

22. CAFÉ BLEU

23. WHITE HOUSE

24. NAUTICAL

25. FRENCH HOUSE.

26. SWISS HOUSE

27. BOULLABAISE

28. LADDER

29. COCONUT GROVE.

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18

[blank page]

[page break]

[drawing of a man’s head and shoulders]

GILBERT DOCKING 45

LUCKENWALDE.

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28

[underlined] RESTAURANTS [/underlined]

A. MIRABELLE

B. HATCHETTS

C. PREMIER

D. PRINCES BAR

[symbol] E. ODDENINOS

F. CAFÉ ROYAL

G. BODEGA

H. CHICKEN COOP

I. HUNGARIA

J. APPENRODT

[symbol] K. MONACO

L. MAISON LYON

M. TROCADERO

N. SCOTTS

O. CORNER HOUSE

IND. P. VIER SWAWNEY

Q. MARTINEZ

C4. R. LEONS

GK S. WHITE [deleted] HOUSE [/deleted] [inserted] TOWERS [/inserted]

T. WINSTON HOTEL

U. EXPRESS DAIRY

V. POLYTECHNIC

W. QUALITY INN

X. QUALITY INN.

[underlined] Contd: [/underlined] on p 31 & 32

[page break]

29

Bridge Game Him – “Two diamonds”

Goch – “Three hearts”

Goer. – “Four ho trump”!

Hit. – “The club”!?

IV – “Pass”!

E – “Pass”!!

G – “Pass” !!X?

[drawing of three men playing bridge]

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30

[blank page]

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31

[underlined] BOLIVAR. [/underlined] PORTLAND PLACE: GOOD BAR & SNACKS.

[underlined] BRISTOL GRILL & BAR [/underlined]. CORK ST. DINE WINE & DANCE

[underlined] SYMONDS HOTEL [/underlined]: BROOK ST. BARS, REST. & SNACK C. (DROP IN)

[underlined] SOUTH MOLTON LOUNGE [/underlined]: DITTO ST. BAR & SNACKS (USEFUL)

[underlined] HOG IN THE POUND [/underlined]: DAVIES ST. & OXFORD ST. BAR. EXC. GRILL ROOM

[underlined] CHICKEN INN [/underlined]: HAYMARKET. REST. & SNACKS.

[underlined] I AM THE ONLY RUNNING FOOTMAN [/underlined]: BERKELY SQ. 1st. CLASS BARS

[underlined] THE CHAIRMAN [/underlined]: BEHIND AIR MINISTRY. BAR. 19th. CENT. ATMOS.

[underlined] SHEPHARDS [/underlined]: SHEPHERDS MKT. (HYDE PK. CORNER) GOOD BARS & DINING. ESPEC. LUNCH. GOOD MEETING PLACE.

[underlined] SNOWS CHOP HOUSE [/underlined]: GLASSHOUSE ST. VERY GOOD QUAL. PLAIN FOOD.

[underlined] MAJORCA [/underlined]: (BEHIND REGENT PAL.) SPANISH ATMOS. MED.

[underlined] TROCADERO [/underlined]: SHAFTESBURY AV. GRILL ROOM. CABARET.

[underlined] GENAROS [/underlined]: NEW COMPTON ST. GOOD ITALIAN CUISINE. FLOWER FOR EVERY LADY. [symbol]

[underlined] SHEARNS [/underlined]: TOTTENHAM CT. ROAD. VEG. REST. EXCELLENT FRUIT TEAS. REC BY BOFF.

[underlined] SCOTTS [/underlined]: PICCADILLY CIRC. (MALE) FAMOUS MIXED GRILLS.

[underlined] SIMPSONS REST. [/underlined] (MALE) EXC. GRILL ROOM.

[underlined] CHESHIRE CHEESE [/underlined]. FLEET ST. EXC. PLAIN COOKING WEDNES. SPEC. STEAK & KIDNEY PUDDING. LUNCH.

[underlined] MRS. COOKS [/underlined]: TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD. SANDWICHES

[underlined] HAMBURGER [/underlined]: DEAN ST. & PICC. CIRC. BEST FISH, CHIP & Bouse IN LONDON. OPEN LATE.

[underlined] BATH HOUSE [/underlined]: DEAN ST. PUB WITH GOOD SNACKS.

[underlined] WHITES [/underlined]: WHITEHALL. RIGHT HAND SIDE FROM TRAFALGAR SQ. 1st. FLOOR. 7 COURSE DINNERS. 1/2 BY BOFFIN

[page break]

32

[underlined] COMMACHIO [/underlined]: FRITH ST. SOHO. ITALIAN. GOOD – CHEAP.

[underlined] WELLINGTON [/underlined]: KNIGHTSBRIDGE. BAR, DANCING – R.A.F.

[underlined] DE HEMMS [/underlined]: SHAFTESBURY AV. OYSTER BAR.

[underlined] STONES CHOP HOUSE [/underlined]: JERMYN ST. (EAST) BEER 18TH. CENT.

[underlined] LORD BELGRAVE [/underlined]: LEICESTER SQ. CHOPS & STEAKS FREE HOUSE. HIGHLY REC.

[underlined] COMEDY [/underlined]: JERMYN ST. MED. CLASS LUNCH. OLD FASH.

[underlined] CAFE ROYAL [/underlined]: REGENT ST. VERY GOOD FOOD

[underlined] RENDEVOUZ [/underlined]: FRITH ST. SOHO. FRENCH CUISINE. WINES.

[underlined] ESCARGON [/underlined]: GREEK ST. FRENCH CUISINE.

[underlined] LES JARDINS DES GOURMETS [/underlined]: OLD COMPTON ST. FRENCH.

[underlined] (PETE WILLIAMS) THE VOLUNTEER [/underlined]: UPPER BAKER ST. (1/4 ML. PAST MARYL. RD) GOOD LUNCH, SNACKS, BEER.

[underlined] THE DUTCH OVEN [/underlined]: LOWER BAKETR ST. ALL MEALS

? [underlined] THE CHILTERN [/underlined]: BAKER ST. TUBE STATION. LIC. LUNCH, DINNER

[underlined] QUALITY INN [/underlined]: COVENTRY ST.

[underlined] LYONS CORNER HOUSE [/underlined] -DO- FOR EARLY BREAKFAST.

[underlined] CAPTAIN’S CABIN [/underlined]: PICC. CIRCUS. BEER & SNACKS

[underlined] FULLERS [/underlined]: VICTORIA. TEAS (CAKES ETC.)

WELLINGTON HORSESHOE [brackets] TOTTENHAM CT. RD. PUBS, LUNCHES

MAPLES: 149 -DO- REST.

[page break]

33

E.F. (Ted) Bridgman, R.C.A.F.. – Berlin 3/1/44 Ste. 14 Harold Apts., Winnipeg, Canada.

Rudy J. Lacerle – F/O J16789

11022 – 92nd Street

Edmonton, Alta, Canada

GILBERT C DOCKING F/O AUS 419930

“TREMAINE”

HARTWELL – VICTORIA – AUSTRALIA.

YOU’RE VERY WELCOME AT THE ABOVE ADDRESS JIM – AUSTRALIA IS A GOOD PLACE AT ANY TIME.

[symbol]

Bill Stapleton

c/o “Bashar”

Winslow Way,

Walten-on Thames

Surrey.

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34

[underlined] Wings Club: [/underlined] Hyde Park Corner. 5/- night, finest in town, preference to flying personnel.

[underlined] KING GEORGE VI CLUB [/underlined]: 102 Piccadilly. 5/- night. Rest., snackbar meals no bar (YMCA) All services.

[underlined] Brevet Club [/underlined]: Charles St. off Berkeley Sq. 7/6. Bar-snacks (RAF)

St. Regis Hotel – Cook St. OK

Plaza – Leicester Sq. NO

Bonnington – Kingsway OK

Symons Hotel – Brook St. Good bar & rest.

Annexe Char X Hotel – Park Lane. Good.

[page break]

35

[blank page]

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36

[German voucher]

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41

[German voucher]

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52

ABOUT THE MIDDLE OF [underlined] JANUARY 1945 [/underlined] A WAGER OF [underlined] ONE D-BAR [/underlined] WAS MADE BETWEEN:-

[underlined] FLIGHT LIEUTENANT W.H. CULLING [/underlined] AND

[underlined] FLIGHT LIEUTENANT J.S.B. TYRIE [/underlined]

THE LATTER STATING THAT THE WAR WOULD NOT BE OVER BY THE [underlined] 15TH.DAY OF MARCH, 1945 [/underlined].

IT HAS BEEN DECIDED MUTUALLY THAT, IN VIEW OF THE PRESENT LACK OF PARCELS, THE WAGER SHALL BE:

[underlined] ONE GOOD DINNER IN LONDON [/underlined], TO BE CONSUMED WHEN [underlined] CONVENIENT TO BOTH PARTIES. [/underlined] EXPENSES TO BE PAID BY LOSER, WHO WILL PRESENT WINNER WITH [underlined] HALF A POUND OF MILK CHOCOLATE [/underlined], TO BE CONSUMED THE SAME EVENING. [/underlined]

AS WITNESS OUR SIGNATURES:

[underlined] [signature] F/LT R.A.F. [signature] F/L R.A.F. [/underlined]

[underlined] THE 26th. DAY OF FEB. 1945. LUCKENWALDE [/underlined]

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53

WH Culling

“Rostellan”

18, Woodlands Rd.

Bushey.

Herts.

Tel: Watford 2904.

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54

[blank page]

[page break]

[drawing of bunk beds]

Rough sketch of block of six 3 tier beds in Stalag 3A.

[circled A] my pack.

[circled B] Boff’s back with blankets

[circled C] Red X box of food.

[circled D] Handles added after 1st. day, great help

[drawing of bed made into sledge containing numerous items]

Hedge. Runners made from sides of bed, nailed to 2 boxes.

[page break]

[underlined] BLOWERS [/underlined]

[drawing of home-made fan]

Large wheel with drive to fan in klim tin, which gives forced draft to bottom of small fire. Fire uses coal, if available, wood, rubbish etc. Boils Klim tin of water in approx. 5 mins.

[drawing of home-made biscuit grinder]

[underlined] Biscuit Grinder [/underlined]

Handle rotates tin with holes punched to give grater effect. Box to collect flour.

[page break]

[newspaper cutting and photograph of Flight Lieutenant Don Dougall, D.F.C with his fiance Miss Patricia Sellares who were married upon his return to Britain.]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[photograph of middle aged woman]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[newspaper cutting and photograph regarding a P.O.W. who married a Lithuanian woman so that she could be free, and has now petitioned for a divorce]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[photograph of middle aged woman standing at a garden gate with a house in the background]

[page break]

[photograph of young woman smiling with hands behind her head]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[symbol] AUTOBAHNS

[symbol] MAIN RLWYS

[symbol] MAIN ROADS

[symbol] OTHER ROADS

[symbol] RIVERS

[symbol] CANALS

[underlined] SCALE

APPROX: 1 INCH = 16 MILES [/underlined]

[page break]

[map drawing of part of Germany]

[page break]

[drawing of interior of block with tiered bunk beds]

[page break]

[drawing of clothing hanging up inside block]

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56

[German newspaper cutting]

[German postage stamp]

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57

[underlined] “MUMMY – I’M SO AFRAID!” [/underlined]

Consider the horrors and alarms of an air-raid! Think of your child’s nerves! Think of how you would reproach yourself, if something happened to your child, because you did not send him in time to the safety of the ‘Childrens’ Evacuation Scheme”. Then you will remember the truth of Dr. Goebbels’ words:

“Nothing is harder for parents than to be separated from their children . . . . but there is the force of conscience, which is stronger than all human laws”

Children do not belong in the dangerous air-raid areas – children should be in the Evacuation Scheme, until the enemy air terror has been broken once & for all!

If you love your child, send him to safety!

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58

[blank page]

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59

ITALIAN CENSORSHIP

[censored letter]

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60

[German newspaper cutting showing a cartoon]

[underlined] THE THREE “EMANCIPATORS” [/underlined]

SING LOUDER, YOU CAN STILL HEAR TOO MUCH GROANING

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61

[German newspaper cutting]

[underlined] BEGINNING OF THE INVASION: IMMEDIATE COUNTER-BLOW [/underlined]

LANDING IN NORTH FRANCE. – AIRBORNE TROOPS PARTLY ENGAGED IN COURSE OF LANDING: MANY PARACHUTE UNITS SMASHED – ARTILLERY ENGAGEMENTS WITH ENEMY SHIPS.

[page break]

[duplicate page]

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[duplicate page]

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62

[German newspaper cutting]

[page break]

[duplicate page]

[page break]

[duplicate page]

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63

[underlined] THESE DEAD ACCUSE [/underlined]

The chief of an English Bomber Squadron stated on Tuesday before the House of Commons “The allied bombing has nothing to do with revenge. It is guided exclusively by strategical & military necessity. No english [sic] or American crew is ever instructed to destroy a German target, which cannot be definitely regarded as a military or industrial objective.

We read this. We have previously heard the same from the lips of Mr. Sinclair or Mr. Atlee. It is the English theory.

But we also read: Victims of a British Terror attack, were Adeline, Ruth and Sieglinde. Or Greta, Edith and Gertrude. Or Martha, Paula, Anna & Liselotte. Or Elisabeth. Ingrid & Emmy. We read: Aged 60, or aged 61. Aged 72, 73, 79 or 80. We read “Fell in January 1944 – born 1888. Or 1886. Or 1884, 1875 or 1869 . . . .

We read the same thing daily in many German papers. The examples are not picked:

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64

To them, unfortunately can be added thousands of names and dates. In an air-raid on 29th. January fell Louise, nee Franck, born in October 1872. On the same day fell also Georg Krang, born 1886, and his wife Helene, born 1890. Thus have so many fallen.

In one night, the head & all members of a family have fallen, with one blow, entire households have been wiped out. Three women here, 4 men there, six, nine. Fathers, mothers, children lie crushed beneath the wreckage.

That is the English practice.

The English practice is murder. Those who carry it out are murderers, nothing else. And those who are its victims, were murdered, in a cowardly way, in the dark and from the rear. That is the way the English wage war. What the Chief of an English Squadron says in the House of Commons, or what the English Minister for Air says, is a lie, destined to keep alive the old lie of the “fair” English gentleman.

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65

If he ever existed, then he has met his inglorious end forever under Churchills methods of war.

Those who fly, and drop their bombs, are his companions: he however, the British Prime Minister, the discoverer, agitator & organiser of their deeds, is the most guilty. He murders from the desolate desire of an unsound mind – a mixture of cowardly brutality and Sadism, typical of his whole career. War brings him satisfaction.

Even in peacetime he dreamt of war. In 1934 he wrote an article re the scientific methods of destruction in modern warfare. It ran:

“All that happened in the first four years of World War, was only a prelude to what was being prepared for the fifth. Thousands of aircraft would have bombed German towns. Poison gas, to which only a secret mask offered protection, & which the Germans could not produce in time, would have destroyed

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66

all resistance. (Following para is condensed)

New forms of explosive might have been discovered, bombs, automatically steered by wireless control, chemical warfare with its germs and plagues. Etc. Etc.

Ten years ago, this was the theory, which the British P.M. now practices. While others in times of peace think and plan good works, his sick mind broods over death.

War was always his aim. He poisoned all England with his plan to wipe out the German race. Today they all think like him. If the BBC announced on 3rd. March 1943 “One is glad that women & children are forced to suffer so terribly” If in January 1941, British United Press demanded. “For God’s sake, lets begin to clean up the German people”. If 3 yrs. ago the Daily Mail announced that they would regard it an honour to do without cigs. alkohol, [sic] sweets etc. in the knowledge that the German capital was being destroyed.

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If the Arch-Bishop of York preached in June 1943. “It is only a small evil to bomb German civilians, & one cannot avoid killing them. – then all this is Churchill’s harvest.

The Fuhrer knew Churchill. In January 1940 he warned us that that [sic] Churchill was thirsting for bombing. Of course it was announced that women & children would be spared. When did England ever halt before women & children.

Since then, women have been killed in thousands – and defenceless men & children.

Every death notice writes a new sentence in the process of accusation against England, against the English and against Churchill. The accusation is Murder. Lies are of no avail against this proof. Judgement has been given. Its execution draws nigh.

(Free translation from the Volkischer Beobachten)

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[German P.O.W declaration that they will not attempt to escape]

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[underlined] Parole [/underlined]

I give my parole as a British Officer that on every occasion I use the new sportsfield to the West of this camp (altered later to: on every occasion I take a walk outside the camp) I will not

1. Attempt to escape

2. Make any preparations for future escapes.

3. Have any dealings with other persons (outside the fences)

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[underlined] Walks: Sagan – Eckersdorf. Petersdorf [/underlined]

About the end of July the sports field adjoining the camp was closed, while new huts were being erected to form an extension to the camp. To compensate for lack of games, a system of parole walks, with German guards, came into being. There were 3 times. 8 AM, 10.30 AM and 2.30 P.M. The 8 A.M. walk was perhaps the best of all, a nip in the air, sun just coming up, peace & quiet everywhere. Against these, however, must be set the very early hour of rising, and walking on a more or less empty stomache. [sic] This poem, written by my room-mate ‘Boff’, is his impression of an 8 AM walk.

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[underlined] Autumn on the Baher [/underlined]

MISTY IN THE HOLLOW, WREATHY PHANTOMS ON THE HILL

GRASS & FLOWERS, RICH GEMS OF MORNING, DRENCHED IN DEWY POOLS

WOODLAND EDGES, GHOSTS ARE GUARDING, SLUMBERING EARTH LIES STILL.

IF THE WISE MEN SLEEP PAST DAWNING, WHO THEN ARE THE FOOLS.

EARTH AWAKENED, BRIGHT THE HOLLOW, SUNBEAMS PAINT THE HILL

GOLDEN LEAVES ARE RIPPLING, STIRRED BY ZEPHYRS OF THE FALL;

GHOSTS OF THE DAWN, AS FLAMING GIANTS, STAND REVEALED, AND FILL

THE MINDS OF FOOL & WISE MAN, WITH THE MYSTERY OF IT ALL.

TWILIGHT SOFTLY FALLING, HILL & HOLLOW SINK IN SLEEP,

MANTLED NIGHT HER CLOAK UNFOLDS, AND LULLAYS ALL TO REST.

CHOOSE! TO SLEEP, FORGETTING ALL, OR WAKE WITH MEMORIS [sic] DEEP

AND POIGNANT; FOOL OR WISE MAN? ONLY GOD KNOWS BEST.

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[German newspaper cutting]

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27-2-45 [underlined] SELECTION OF RUMOURS FOR ONE DAY AT STALAG 3A. [/underlined]

1. The Danish Red X have placed a lorry at our disposal to fetch parcels.

2. The Norwegian Red X have despatched supplies of dried cod and herring.

3. There are 3000 parcels (Danish) available of which Norwegians have promised in a share.

4. We are to have 3 issues of 1/4 loaf this week to make up for short ration of spuds.

5. Mussolini has been bumped.

6. Announced in Amer. Block that Danish have despatched lorry load of dry fish.

7. American fighters seen other day shot up & blew up engine of train from Berlin to Luckenwalde.

8. 47 (or 4 parcel sacks) have arrived after being forwarded from Sagan.

9. British troops on outskirts of Cologne.

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To: Col. Goodrich. South Compound

From. Oberst von Lindeiner. Kommandant.

On the 28th. Nov. 1943, prisoners of your camp, after going to a concert in the North Camp, in spite of express orders to the contrary, played the British National Anthem.

This conduct - - - - - - is a serious provocation to the German Armed forces and civilian population, if at the same time that many thousands of innocent women and children are being killed - - - - those who are causing this misfortune behave in such a manner.

To avoid such incidents - - - I forbid the South Compound to practice instrumental music. Contravention will result in the punishment of those responsible and the confiscation of the instruments.

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[counterfoil for entry into examination]

[underlined] January 23rd – 27th. 1945 [/underlined]

Sat [brackets] Advanced German Elementary Spanish Intermediate Spanish

Papers left behind during evacuation in care of Padre.

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[German voucher]

P.O.W. Camp – money.

Voucher for 50 Reichspfennig.

This voucher is only valid as P.O.W. currency, and may only be used by them inside camps, or, on working parties, in the special shops permitted to do so. This voucher may only be exchanged for legal currency at the official office of the camp administration.

Contravention, forgery etc. will be punished.

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[two Portuguese postage stamps]

[underlined] Taken from a Portugese [sic] food parcel. [/underlined]

At one time, these arrived in fair quantities, consisting mainly of tins of sardines.

Stamps were generally removed from all parcels and letters, to check for possible messages underneath.

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[German newspaper cutting]

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[underlined] ARE YOU INTERESTED, MR. RIPLEY? [/underlined]

[underlined] Men against Aircraft Masses.

13 German fliers shoot down 2961 enemy maschines. [sic] [/underlined]

In the West, the South and the East of Germany, the men of the German Air Force take the air daily; inferior in numbers, but unbroken in fighting spirit and ready, despite their overwhelming superiority, to dive with fatalistic determination on the enemy formations and shoot down as many as possible. Against the masses of enemy aircraft we set the brave individual fighter of the air, who heeds not a ten – or even twentyfold superiority, and throws himself undeterred against the stream of enemy bombers to deal destructive blows.

The example of those men, whom no fliers in the world excel, shows what individual fighters can achieve, if they

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engage with determination the superiority in numbers of the enemy squadrons. Recently, the leader of the famous german [sic] arctic fighters announced his 200th air victory – his name, Major Ehrler. Thus the German Air Force has once again in its ranks 13 fighter pilots, who have reached the number of 200 or even 300 air victories. Over 100 other German fighter pilots have won more than 100 air victories.

The names of the pilots with more than 200 victories are:

1. Major Hartmann 303

2. – Rall 273

3. – Barkhorn 272

4. – Nowotny 258

5. Haup. Batz 224

6. Oberstl. Graf 207

7. Maj. Rudorfer 206

8. Leut. Schuck 206

9. Oberl. Hafner 204

10. Leut. Kittel 204

11. Major Bar 203

12. Hauptm. Wiezenberger 201

13. Maj. Ehrler 200

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These 13 most successful German fighter pilots have thus destroyed a total of 2961 enemy aircraft. 37 complete squadrons of the Soviet and Anglo-American Air Forces, with maschines [sic] and crews, were wiped out by these few German pilots alone. Consider that there are many four-engined aircraft amongst this 3000, and take a conservative estimate of an average crew of 5 men per aircraft, we thus find that each of these pilots has either killed or sent to captivity 1000 enemy soldiers. Just 13 men have destroyed 15,000 front line soldiers! – as the army man would say, 10 enemy regiments wiped out.

The size of these German successes is best seen by the announcements of the enemy press, regarding the “Aces” of the enemy air force. Thus the English announced recently that W/C Braham (?) had been taken prisoner. With 29 victories he was amongst the best of the RAF.

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The Americans announced the death of a Lt. Beeson, who was tops of the Amer. fighter pilots with 21 victories. Both pilots were decorated with the highest English and American orders. The Soviet Air Force names Major Popoff and Haupton, Pokrischkin, with 82 and so victories, as the best Russian pilots. Both have been twice decorated with the order of “Hero of the Soviet Union” The German air force can point to 150 pilots, who have won as many or more victories.

The German fighter pilots will take care that the words of an american crew, in a book just published, remain true.

Don’t deceive yourself; its no piece of cake over there. Respect these Goring boys. These nazi-fighters are fanatics, who make life very unpleasant for us.

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That the war would be over by the 2nd. Dec. 1944

Made November 1944

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[underlined] The following is the text of a poster issued by the German Authorities. [/underlined]

To All Prisoners of War.

The escape from prison camps is no longer a sport.

Germany has always kept to the Hague Convention and only punished recaptured P.O.W’s with minor disciplinary punishment.

German will still maintain these principles of international law.

But England has besides fighting at the front in an honest manner instituted an illegal warfare in non-combat zones in the form of gangster commandos, terror bandits and sabotage troops even up to the frontiers of Germany.

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They say in a secret and confidential captured English military pamphlet.

THE HANDBOOK OF MODERN IRREGULAR WARFARE

“. . . the days when we could practise the rules of sportsmanship are over. For the time being, every soldier must be a potential gangster and must be prepared to adopt their methods when ever necessary.”

“The sphere of operations should always include the enemy’s own country and any occupied territory, and in certain circumstances, such neutral countries he is using as a source of supply.”

England has with these instructions opened up a non-military form of gangster war!

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Germany is determined to safeguard her homeland, and especially her war industry and provisional centres for the fighting fronts. Therefor [sic] it has become necessary to create strictly forbidden zones, call death zones, in which all unauthorised trespassers will be immediately shot on sight.

Escaping prisoners of war, entering such death zones, will certainly lose their lives. They are therefore in costant [sic] danger of being mistaken for enemy agents or sabotage groups.

[underlined] Urgent warning is given against making future escapes [/underlined]

In plain English: Stay in the camp where you will be safe! Breaking

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out of it is now a damned dangerous act.

[underlined] The chances of preserving your life are almost nil! [/underlined]

All police and military guards have been given the most strict orders to shoot on sight all suspected persons.

Escaping from prison camps has ceased to be a sport!

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[German cartoon]

Hallo – Hey! What about helping me? Sorry, Sir – We are no longer responsible for that!

Ex. Das Reich. 10-44

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[German newspaper cutting]

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[German newspaper cutting with four Japanese cartoons]

TRANSLATION ON NEXT PAGE

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[underlined] Japanese Caricatures [/underlined]

How do his country’s enemies appear to the Japanese caricaturist? To answer this question, we publish today four caricatures from the Japanese newspaper “Manga” Except where it is obvious, as in the case of the drawing of Churchhill, [sic] we give a short description of each.

The union of the peoples of Greater East Asia under the leadership of Japan runs contrary to Roosevelt’s imperialistic plans. Using the same methods as in Europe he appears to the Tschungking Chinese, and their General Tschiangkaischeck, as the Angel of Peace. Now, when Tschungking China is in greatest danger, it feels more and more the thorns of the

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promised victory laurels.

Churchill cannot pursue a policy of his own in East Asia. He contents himself therefore with the roll of Sancho P. in Roosevelts Don Quijote [sic] policy. It is all the same where he goes on the mule, China.

The allies won’t reach Tokio, unless their entry looks something like what the Japanese caricaturist depicts.

[symbol]

Ex. Volkischer Beobachter, 16-12-44.

[symbol]

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XMAS 1944

[hand painted greetings card]

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F.LT. J.S.B. TYRIE

[list of signatures]

MENU

SOUP

ROAST TURKEY

CORNISH PASTIES

PEAS CARROTS ROAST POTATOES

GRAVIES

XMAS PUDDING & CREAM

MINCE PIES

CHEESE & BISCUITS

FRUIT & NUTS

COFFEE

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[German poster]

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Issue of 1/5 DANISH PARCEL FROM NORWEGIANS.

OUR PARCEL DONATED ORIGINALLY BY:

ARKITEKT, THORVALD DREYER

TRONDHJEMSGADE 12 0

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[underlined] Birkenstedt [/underlined] Thursday 1-2-45.

Taking this chance to jot down a few notes. Things started on 13/1, with the opening of R. offensive. Crowds round the loudspeaker once again & more rumours than ever before. No word at all of camp being moved despite rapid advances made by R. Suddenly on the night of Sat. 27th. at 7.30 pm. a shout is heard – move in 1/2 hr. At first hardly believed, it is soon confirmed & chaos ensues. The day before, 20 NCO’s from Bankau (Nr. Cracow) & 500 Dutchmen. Stories of forced marches and

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terrible hardships, no food etc. this made everyone decide to take bare minimum. Beds, boxes, lockers etc were broken up, sawn up etc and improvised sledges built. I had already made a rucsack [sic] – just in case. 1500 parcels, 1/2 million cigs, countless clothing and so on were left behind. After a false start about 1 AM. we eventually set off in snow & darkness about 7 AM. For the previous week we had been watching streams of evacuees pouring down the road in carts, mostly old men & women & kids. Information received, high mortality rate amongst children.

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From Belaria we went first thro’ Sagan to N. camp. The guards had heavy packs, which a lot put on our sledges, in exchange for bread etc. Rations had stopped coming into camp a few days before leaving. Learnt later that N. camp etc. moved off much same time as us. Did about 21 kls. first day, arriving for night in Kanan, a small village. On way thro’ one village, old German peasant asks with broad Am accent, who we are! Quarters are chaotic, in an old barn. Total strength of column approx 1200 Spent night (racket) in house on

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farm, in a room occupied by Russian family 2 men, old woman 2 kids. Conversation done thro’ Germ. kid who had picked up Russian, myself speaking in German. Everyone unbelievably helpful & kind.

Moved off at 8 AM next day to arrive in afternoon at Gross Selten, another 20 K’s approx. Same accomodations, [sic] large barns. Spent night in barn, uncomfortable, but slept OK. Tank company there who had been forced back from Kiele. They had lost everything. Bill Kingsfield Upper Warder Wooden Way 90 miles

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Paul [deleted] [indecipherable word] [/deleted] Putterill, Cedars Road 34, Chiswick, London W4 Excursion with Sam Brown. Spend a day of so-called rest. Tank unit gave away biscuits everyone one big happy family. 40 km. shell. Milk cows in Amer parts. Off next day, sharing our sled with Dave Simpson (my partner being Boff Goodwin) made 21 kls to Birkenstedt including our biggest hill so far.

[underlined] Luckenwalde. [/underlined]

Birkenstedt much the same as other places – big barn for sleeping

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no sanitary arrangements, washing facilities or hot meal. Guards are educating civil pop. who now want choc & coffee for bread. Overnight a tremendous thaw sets in and by morning, all is a sea of slush and mud. Stayed day here once more – waste of time and food, as not really any rest in the meaning of the word. Next day Americans set out independently – sorry to lose them (approx. 300). We follow, sledges being abandoned after a few yards. March into Muskan, 7 kls. Open bartering in market square with civil pop. Then on a further 17 kls. to Steinan – a gruelling total of 24 kls. with few rests. Arrive in dark, and split up into groups of 100 to go to individual

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barns. Our particular barn could not be found by ration party, so that we go without the only Germ. issue. Off at 9 AM next morning – 6 kms. Walk from Steinan to Spremberg where we go to large army barracks and join with 400 of East camp. Issued with Wehrmacht soup – first hot meal for a week, - locked in for air raid. Average of 1 by day & 1 by night of raids. March 3 kls to goods yard, arriving 4 PM. where we get into box cars – 46 men in a truck. As usual, no light and no room to lie down. More bartering

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Eventually set out at 7 PM and after many trials thro’ the night owing to absence of abort are still travelling when day comes. Stops made alongside various army trains – more bartering. Arrive in Luckenwalde about 5 pm – heaven knows where we went to during night. March in darkness, after being counted, thro’ town and 3 kls. to camp where we stand in rain for 3/4 of hour waiting to get in. Getting in, are herded into small space to wait for shower air-raid, no lights, chaos. After waiting 6 hours, fight our way with all kit to have communal

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shower. After crowded shower, to Abwehr hut where we are searched & extra blankets etc removed. My searcher Pow in Aus. last war, internee till 1941 in England this war. Then to huts where conditions are dirty and overcrowded, without any heating or other facilities. Next door we have a hut of Americans in quarantine for Scarlet fever, then a hut of Polish Pows mostly in civvy clothes. Have met quite a few old friends. Have heard American S. camp did march of 33 kls. on first night – 1/2 dozen died of exposure.

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[underlined] Wed 14th. Feb. [/underlined] Have now more or less settled down in this place. In our half of the hut there are 225 men, sleeping mostly on [deleted] [indecipherable word] [/deleted] 3 tier beds which are built in blocks of 6 and rather shaky. Very little straw for sacks and very uncomfortable. About 10 tables available and about 1 stool to 8 men. Most of E camp seemed to have had far more food than Belaria which is rather annoying. Cigs. are increasing in value by leaps and bounds – they will be our only medium of exchange till more parcels arrive. German rations are 1/6 loaf of brown army bread, which give 5 – 6 slices. Very new & doughy. Midday, an issue of 1/2 klim tin of soup – watery porridge barley mixture or pea soup etc. Each day we get about a matchbox full of marg, fat or meat paste between two – this is spread. Twice a week, about a tablespoon & 1/2 of sugar. Even these rations are variable and at times fail to materialise. Besides the Polish officers, there are several hundred Norwegians who were removed about 18 months ago from Norway and have eventually got here.

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There are also Italian officers in our compound, and American Army officers from Shukin, who marched 3 – 4 weeks and were even worse off than us. Remainder of Baukan people have also arrived. Elsewhere in camp are British Army privates, Russians, Serbs and other nationalities.

I brought with me 2 blankets, pair trousers, shirt, underpants, numerous socks, & handkerchiefs. 2 log books and all photos, spare pair of boots, 700 cigs approx, small pillow, 1/2 dozen odd tins of food, white jug, one red cross Am. parcel 3 packets (2 oz) tea and 1/2 lb. sugar. 16 cakes of barley choc. Was wearing cap, great coat, tunic, pullover, white sweater, shirt, thick vest, un/pants & trousers, socks & boots, scarf & gloves (2 prs) Pockets filled with odds & ends like razor, boot laces, K.F. Spoon etc.

We now learn that R. have reached Sagan. What happened to 500 sick left behind? Remainder of British gone to Bremen, Americans to Buckenwalde? From Spremberg we appear to have gone towards Leipzig, coming

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here from sw direction. (Only conjecture). Since coming here there has been an air raid warning practically every night, usually 2 or 3, and almost every day. Great lack of containers to do washing and drying facilities. No newspapers issued at all. Two [deleted] infinites [/deleted] very poor stoves for 450 men to cook on and meagre coal ration. Quite a few jam tin stoves of various types. Tending to dream by day and night of food and proposed meals on return home. Before leaving Belaria, had been suffering for some time of lack of feeling in all toes & tendency of other extremities to suffer from pins & needles. Vit. B injections by Doc. Twee. Symptoms seem to be quite common amongst friends. Last 2 days has seen some improvement, perhaps due to warmer weather. Present rates of exchange £15 watch – 400 cigs. D-bar 100, loaf of bread – 50 (if you can find deal!) Great shortage of reading material.

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[underlined] Friday 16th [/underlined] About 6 pm, warning given that we may be off again in early morning. Reason, instructions having been given to kitchen to have hot barley ready for 6.30 am. [deleted] [indecipherable word] [/deleted] chaos on roads with evacuees, I expect. Lights in barracks usually off for 1 1/2 hrs each night – saving current. We shall be prepared this time – too easy, nothing to prepare!

[underlined] Sat. 17th [/underlined] Nothing happened. Apparently only to enable kitchen to prepare extra soup, which was to be issued to make up for cut in bread ration. Ration had been cut from 300 to 200 grms. Per day per man, or 7 1/2 men per loaf. Announced today we are to go back on old ration of 5 to a loaf. Disturbing feature of low rations & slops is necessity of getting up in night for A.R. Extremely common, even at Belaria, but first time for myself. 109 crashed near camp, pilot just made bale out. Large truck of parcels for Norwegians arrived. Potato ration remains same – about 4 average potatoes, overcooked, unpeeled and rather dirty, each day.

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JW. Reilly

95, Kennedy Cresc.

Kirkcaldy.

[underlined] 20-2-45 [/underlined] Several days ago Norwegians gave 500 Danish parcels to compound. Issue already made to Amers. & Poles, but we still await fate of our 1/5 parcel. Delay due to investigation of health of Baukan NCO’s in opposite compound. Trading goes on apace. Loaf of bread 60 cigs. Considerable trading in Red X food, origin unknown. Annoying to watch Serbs etc. collect Amer. Red X parcels each day. Red X merely feeding them to work for Germany. Extreme lack of reading material, and my cig. supply is getting low. Pea & Cabbage soup at midday, 90% water. Contin. air activity day and night.

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[underlined] 24-2-45 [/underlined] Air raid in morning, issue of 1/5 Danish parcel per head in evening. Extremely welcome and excellent parcel. Contents: 1 lb. Butter, 1 lb. Sugar, 1 lb. Cheese, 1 lb. bacon sausage, large packet porridge, small piece of toffee, large packet Ryvita bisc. small piece of soap, 1 lb. tin of treacle. Trading with army organised on revised price list. Outcome awaited. Evening raid. Probable jettison of bombs blew open barrack doors and knocked tins off shelf. Feel absolutely without energy to do anything, otherwise OK except for head cold and dry irritating cough. Wrote another P.C. home Total issue here, 1 change of camp P.C., 1 letter, 1 P.C.

26-2-45. Wrote letter home. 27.2.45. At long last met F/L Patterson from E camp, of whom I had heard so much in letters from home.

6.3.44 [sic] Announced today that Germans have stated we shall get 1/2 issue Amer. parcel probably tomorrow. Practically finished my butt ends, & just becoming efficient in rolling non-sticky papers. It was announced too some time ago that we were moved on request of our Senior Officers, the decision being greeted with cheers by camp. Several officers were to be repatriated for good conduct etc. on march. This

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later given up owing to bombing of Dresden. Showers of snow lately, but not lasting. Lights out in future at 9 pm each evening. Made cribbage board & cig. holder. Compiled lists of rests. dishes & menus. Recent visit of Max Schmelling to camp. Great scarcity of paper, above all writing paper. Canteen issue of coloured crepe, presumably as bumf. 7.3.44 Announced that 23 truck loads of Am. parcels have arrived in station. Policy of immediate full issue & another. 8.3.44 The fuel, coal etc. Bedboards going. Received Am. parcel per head 9.3.44 Moved beds round block, built stove, v. tired. 10.3. Received 1/7 Swedish Grocers’ parcels. Contents Knackebrot, Gooseberry Jam, 2 tins pork meat, milk powder, alum. cup & teasp. soap, sugar, 2 box. matches, 2 tins sardines. Last 3 nights unable to get to sleep due to mental activity After bash of Swed. food slept well. Biggest problem dhobie & keeping body clean. 17.3 Watched large Am. daylight raid on Berlin & district. Help arrange Foodacco & Norwegian Exchange. Another Parcel and promise of 5 day issue in future. Saturday brings rumours of another move. 27.3. X-ray for TB. 10-4-45. Told of rumour that we move on 11-4. Finally start moving at 8 AM on 13-4, token search & arrive at station 12 PM. 40 men to a truck. Trading & barter produced bread & onions. 15.4. We move back to camp. Raid on Potsdam heard very plainly esp. flak. News terrific – also the rumours

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3 ncos attempt to escape from camp, 1 shot dead other died later. Heard that Dugal MacTaggart was with Bankan mob. Contacted him and had long natter. Thunderbolts seen on numerous occasions, dive bombing, strafing etc Weather continues fine. Wizard cake to celebrate 4th anniversary. Rations variable, 1/8 loaf bread fairly constant.

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Collection

Citation

Jim Tyrie, “Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. Two,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed October 21, 2020, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/22221.

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