Elizabethan News

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Title

Elizabethan News

Description

A newspaper issued on board the RMS Queen Elizabeth. On an envelope is handwritten 'Elizabethan News Nov 11/12 1942 Issued daily on RMS Queen Elizabeth 1942'. There is a coloured drawing of the ship and two pages of news.

Date

1942-11-11
1942-11-12

Temporal Coverage

Spatial Coverage

Language

Type

Format

Two newspaper sheets, an envelope and a coloured drawing

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

MAllenJH179996-160512-010001,
MAllenJH179996-160512-010002,
MAllenJH179996-160512-010003,
MAllenJH179996-160512-010004

Transcription

CB 200
ELIZABETHAN NEWS Nov 11/12 1942
ISSUED DAILY ON RMS QUEEN ELIZABETH 1942.
[stamp crown OFFICIAL PAID]
[page break]
[coloured drawing of R.MS. QUEEN ELIZABETH]
R.M.S. ‘QUEEN ELIZABETH’.
[page break]
ELIZABETHAN NEWS
SERIES 5, No. 2 WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1942 ONE PENNY
EIGHTH ARMY IN MERSAH MATRUH
SOLLUM, SIDI BARANI BESIEGED
Highlights of yesterday’s reports on the victorious Allied sweep through the desert include:
Mersah Matruh was occupied by British troops on Monday;
Enemy rearguards at Sidi Barani and Sollum are being engaged;
Axis columns are being chased by armoured units south of Daba;
Rommel’s forces are estimated to have retreated 250 miles in 6 days.
The Germans are still fighting in their retreat, and it is expected that a number of rearguard actions will have to be fought before the main enemy forces are engaged.
The enemy have numbers of guns left but few tanks.
Regrouping Forces
Rommel is believed to be regrouping what remains of his forces for a stand along the frontier.
DEVASTATION IN MATRUH
When British troops entered Mersah Matruh they passed through a devastated town. Hardly a house was left standing after the heavy shelling and bombing by the R.A.F. Every few yards there were burnt-out vehicles of all kinds.
Harbour Damage
In the harbour, a large tanker was lying on its side. Other ships were sunk. A small dock hanger was a mass of debris.
ALLIED NEW GUINEA SUCCESS
Allied troops in New Guinea overwhelmed on enemy position near Guarali.
Runways and buildings on a Japanese airfield were bombed and an enemy transport was so badly damaged that it had to be beached.
ADVANCE AT GUADALCANAL
American troops at Guadalcanal made another advance east of the airfield.
JAPANESE DESTROYER SUNK
In the Solomons area a Japanese destroyer was hit by bombs and sunk.
HEAVY RAID ON HAMBURG
The R.A.F. made a heavy attack on north-west Germany. Hamburg was the main target.
Heavy clouds and icing conditions hampered the raiders.
Fifteen bombers failed to return.
[underlined] SHIPBOARD NEWS [/underlined]
ANOTHER CONCERT TOMORROW
Weather and other circumstances permitting, Capt. Graham, U.S. Army, hopes to repeat the concert for the troops in the main mess hall tomorrow (Thursday) evening.
ORAN SURRENDERS;
‘JEAN BART’ ABLAZE;
F.D.R.’s TUNIS MOVE
ORAN SURRENDERED TO AMERICAN FORCES AT 3 P.M. YESTERDAY, AFTER THE TOWN HAD BEEN SURROUNDED AND 2,000 PRISONERS TAKEN.
Stiff resistance is reported from Casablanca, where French air forces and light naval units have been very active. The Vichy battleship Jean Bart was badly damaged in a naval engagement on Monday and was reported yesterday to be burning fiercely. Admiral Darlan is officially a prisoner of war in Algiers. Marshal Petain has assumed control of all Vichy forces.
THE FALL OF ORAN
Brief despatches from war correspondents on the fall of Oran, state that American troops penetrated to the rear of the town and occupied Valmy, 10 miles to the south. Other units simultaneously captured St. Cloud, 13 miles east, and Perraguax, 40 miles south-west of the town.
With the town surrounded and 2,000 prisoners in Allied hands, the French leader surrendered.
No heavy French naval units were in action in this area, and no hostile air forces were reported.
GLAD TO BE CAPTURED
Lieut.-General Eisenhower, in command of all operations, speaking of the obvious unwillingness of the French to fight Americans, said, “Prisoners taken at Oran did not attempt to conceal their pleasure at being captured. Their only anger was at the United States forces inflicting injuries, although the Americans themselves had casualties.”
‘Decisive Blow’
[black and white photograph of headshot of Winston Churchill]
Speaking at the Mansion House, London, yesterday, the Premier, Mr Winston Churchill said, ‘We have gained a decisive victory over the Axis. We have gained new ground to open a new battle front from which to attack Hitler.
“President Roosevelt was the author of the French North African campaign while I was his ardent lieutenant.”
CASABLANCA RESISTANCE
Brief reports from the Casablanca area mention a naval engagement on Monday in which the 35,000 ton Jean Bart was badly damaged, and was reported yesterday to be burning fiercely.
French air forces and naval units contested Allied landings at Casablanca more strongly than in any other area. The situation has been complicated by the arrival of shiploads of women and children evacuated from Dakar.
Surrender Offer
General Patton, in charge of local operations, went ashore under a flag of truce with terms for the surrender of the town. These were refused and fighting broke out on an increased scale after the General had returned to his ship;.
TWO TOWNS TAKEN
American forces have occupied Fedala, north of Casablanca, and Saffi, to the south-west of the town. More troops were landed at Agadir and Mogador.
DARLAN A PRISONER
It was officially stated in London yesterday that Admiral Darlan is a prisoner of war in Algiers.
Petain Takes Over
Marshal Petain announced that he had assumed control of all Vichy forces.
U.S. NAVAL FORCE
The United States naval forces in the North African attack consisted of three 35,000-ton battleships, four aircraft carriers, seven cruisers and numerous destroyers and light naval craft, stated a Washington message.
The Paris radio declared yesterday that in addition to a very large British convoy which left Gibraltar on November 6, another British convoy of about 30 units left there next day.
ANOTHER LANDING
A despatch late last night said that American troops had landed at Phillipeville, 50 miles west of Bona, neor [sic] the Tunis-Algeria border.
Bona airdrome was reported to have been bombed.
ROOSEVELT ASKS TO MOVE TROOPS INTO TUNISIA
President Roosevelt has asked permission for Allied troops to go through Tunisia into Libya to attack the Axis forces from the rear.
In a message yesterday to the Bey of Tunis, the President said he hoped Allied troops would be allowed to pass through French Tunisia.
He referred to the indomitable spirit of French Tunisia and hoped for the great privilege of accomplishing the task of completely eliminating the forces of evil from north Africa.
Convoy in Five-Day Battle with U-Boats
A big Atlantic convoy has arrived safely at a British port after a running fight for five days with a pack of U-boats.
Warships escorting the convoy attacked the enemy, and it is definitely known that two U-boats were sunk and several others were probably severely damaged.
570 SUBMARINES DESTROYED
The First Lord of the Admiralty announced in London yesterday that over 570 enemy submarines had been definitely destroyed.
Three weeks ago, the First Lord stated that 530 U-boats had been sunk.
FIGHTING IN RUSSIA QUIETENS
Yesterday’s Moscow communique stated there was no important change in the situation from the Black Sea to the Baltic. German attacks everywhere were slackening in intensity.
In Stalingrad the Russians have beaten off more enemy attacks, while south-east of Nalchik the Germans have suffered heavy losses.
ODDS AND ENDS
Two humourous [sic] items taken from yesterday’s despatches from the Libya battle front:
During mopping-up operations at Mersah Matruh in the last few days, a German prisoner was asked to what unit he belonged. He replied that he did not really belong to anyone. He had arrived from Greece some days previously and had been waiting at a cross-roads until he was picked up.
Members of a R.A.F. unit captured a new type of booty. It consisted of many brass band instruments which had been sent across from Italy to play Field Marshal Erwin Rommel – in a white tank, maybe – and his victorious Afrika Korps into Alexandria.
PAL!
Obituary taken from church paper:
LOUIS R. MARCH; Feb 7, 1867, d. April 16, 1940; joined – church in 1884; leaves widow and 15 children; W.W. Smart assisted.
ADDLED
A member of a Ladies Aid Society in a small town went to the bank to deposit, as she told the banker, “some aid money.”
Unfortunately the banker thought she said “egg money” and said:
“Remarkable, isn’t it, how well the old hens are doing these days?”
CAUTIOUS
A hotel chambermaid was tipped and asked not to give away the fact that a couple just arrived were newly married.
Going along the corridor a woman guest stopped her and said: “Honeymoon couple in the end room, aren’t they, Mary?”
Loyal to her tip, Mary replied: “No, madam, you’re quite wrong. They’re just friends.’
FINALLY –
A Dutch civilian charged by the Gestapo with espionage was found Not Guilty by a Nazi military court. Fair play is suspected.
[page break]
ELIZABETHAN NEWS
SERIES 5, No. 3 THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1942 ONE PENNY
Dramatic moves in Europe and the Mediterranean have followed the brilliant Allied African offensive.
GERMAN FORCES MARCH INTO VICHY FRANCE;
HOSTILITIES CEASE IN NORTH AFRICAN ZONE;
CASABLANCA OCCUPIED BY ALLIES
German troops, in swift moves, raced into Unoccupied France yesterday, taking Vichy and Lyons, moving towards Marseilles, and reaching the northern Spanish border. Casablanca capitulated to American forces yesterday, and fighting has ceased in the North African zone. Axis air-borne forces have landed in Tunisia; Italian divisions are at Bizerta. Vichy fleet units suffered severely in naval actions at Casablanca; twenty-four destroyers were sunk or damaged in the harbour.
FIGHTING CEASES
It was officially announced from the Allied headquarters in Algiers yesterday that with the capitulation of Casablanca, hostilities between Allied troops and the French North African forces had ceased.
After two full days’ fighting, American troops secured the last of the important bases in the operational zone, and they are now preparing for possible Axis reactions.
NAVAL ACTION AT CASABLANCA
An entire force of French destroyers and other fighter craft were wiped out at Casablanca, according to war correspondents’ cables. The battleship Jean Bart is a blazing hulk and a heavy cruiser was badly damaged.
Twenty-four Vichy destroyers in the harbour were sunk or severely damaged.
Admiral Hewitt threw in the entire weight of his battle fleet, including dive bombers, to overcome the bitter French resistance.
American trooos [sic] moved in to occupy the city after armistice terms had been arranged.
FRENCH WELCOME U.S. TROOPS
Allied forces have now completely occupied Algiers and Oran. The French people gave them a warm welcome as they marched in.
“French are our Friends”
General Eisenhower said yesterday he did not think of Oran as a military victory. “The French are our friends and we wish to think of them as our friends,” he declared.
PRESIDENT REVEALS OFFENSIVE PLAN
[black and white photograph of headshot of President Roosevelt]
President Roosevelt revealed in Washington yesterday how the details of the Allied offensive were planned. He stated the plan for the North African campaign originated last December, when he invited Mr. Winston Churchill to visit the United States.
Various ideas were put forward for an attack across the English Channel. Military and naval opinion at that time believed a frontal attack would be possible. But, he said, after preliminary preparations had started, it became more and more apparent that an offensive against the Belgian coast could not be carried out with reasonable success in 1942.
The same question arose during Mr. Churchill’s visit to America in June, continued the President. They discussed whether to launch a very large-scale offensive in the middle of 1943, or to start a smaller-scale offensive this year. By the end of June there was general agreement on the African offensive. By late July certain fundamental details, such as the number of men necessary and the points of attack, had been determined.
PETAIN PROTESTS AGAINST OCCUPATION
German troops, without warning, began moving into Unoccupied France yesterday morning as “a measure to protect the French Fleet and to forestall a possible Allied attack on Corsica and the south of France,” Hitler declared.
Vichy and Lyon were occupied. Troops have reached Pan, north of the Spanish border, in the Pyrenees foothills. Other forces are rushing across France to seize key-points, including Marseilles. Italian troops have joined in the occupation.
London believes the occupation may be a prelude to the long-expected German invasion of Spain and Portugal.
Marshal Petain protested to General von Runstedt, military commander of Occupied France that “All the German decisions are incompatible with the Armistice terms.”
DE GAULLE’S BROADCAST APPEAL TO FRENCHMEN
General de Gaulle made a broadcast appeal yesterday afternoon to all French soldiers and sailors to join the Fighting French forces. French sailors were urged to take their vessels to Gibraltar or Algiers, and to scuttle them if escape was impossible.
AXIS AIR TROOPS LAND IN TUNISIA
Some German troop-carrying transports, escorted by fighter planes, landed in Tunisia during darkness yesterday, according to a late London message. The exact location was not stated, nor the extent of any possible French opposition.
Several Italian infantry divisions landed at the Tunisian port of Bizerta from Sicily and Sardinia. Other divisions were reported to be moving into the country from Libya.
According to a German report yesterday, the Bey of Tunis has agreed to the passage of American troops through Tunisia.
(GEOGRAPHICAL NOTE. – Tunisia is strategically placed between Libya and Morocco. It dominates, with Sicily, the “bend” in the Mediterranean, and overlooks the island of Pantelleria, Italian air base.)
What Do We Do Now?
Hitler and Mussolini, and possibly Laval, were believed to have met either in Rome or Berlin yesterday to discuss the present situation in North Africa, and the strengthening of Italy’s coastal defences against a possible Allied invasion.
DARLAN PRO-ALLIES?
Admiral Darlan, who is both prisoner and guest of the American commander in Algiers, was abused all day by the German radio yesterday.
Suspicions were cast on his reason for leaving France, and the speakers definitely stated that the Admiral is likely to join the Allies.
Organise Armed Forces
The radio declared that the Vichy Vice-Premier went to North Africa with the intention of organising the armed forces in support of the Allies.
INDO-CHINA DEMONSTRATIONS
Anti-French demonstrations broke out in French Indo-China yesterday as a result of the situation in north Africa.
The Vichy Governor General has ordered all French officials to remain at their posts, and issued a decree forbidding anyone to listen to Allied broadcasts under severe penalties.
ARMISTICE DAY
[black and white photograph of headshot of King George VI]
The King laid a wreath at the Cenotaph yesterday. He was accompanied by the Queen.
There was no official ceremony at 11 a.m.
FRENCH DEFY BAN
Defying a Vichy ban on demonstrations, Armistice Day Silence was observed throughout France, in churches, factories and shops, at noon.
AXIS DRIVEN FROM SIDI BARANI
British forces drove the enemy from Sidi Barani and engaged rearguards at Buq Buq, about 30 miles from the frontier, stated yesterday’s Middle East communique.
The huge task of collecting prisoners and equipment continued.
ROMMEL QUITTING RUMOUR
Reports are circulating in Madrid that Rommel has sent urgent messages to Hitler asking for sufficient ships to evacuate the remains of his battered forces as quickly as possible.
FIGHTING IN NEW GUINEA NEARS DECISIVE STAGE
Fighting in New Guinea is nearing a decisive stage, states a message from General MacArthur’s headquarters.
American troops, which were recently flown from Australia, are closing in on the Japanese, who have suffered heavy losses around Buna.
The message states that the enemy have been almost cleared out of Papua.
Remarkable “Bag” by British Submarine
The British submarine Proteus, operating in the central Mediterranean, sank five enemy supply ships and a troopship of 8,000 tons, and torpedoed a second troopship, besides a tanker, an escort vessel and another medium-sized supply ship.
Later, the submarine sank a large enemy supply ship and seriously damaged another.
QUIETER AT STALINGRAD
In the Stalingrad factory area, fighting has slackened, enabling the Russians to consolidate positions.
In one counter-attack, Soviet troops won some positions and occupied three block houses.

Collection

Citation

RMS Queen Elizabeth, “Elizabethan News,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed September 27, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/16300.

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