Evidence in Camera Vol 4 No 3

MMcDermottC1119618-161216-03.pdf

Title

Evidence in Camera Vol 4 No 3

Description

A magazine of aerial photographs covering the bombing of Cologne, railway yards, factories, gun battery, Copenhagen, two prominent island landmarks, an attack on a U-boat, storage depot, the Schneider works at Le Creusot, Do 217 s at Munich and Dijon airfields, low level views of railways and a problem image of a wind tunnel at Paris,

Date

1943-07-19

Temporal Coverage

Language

Type

Format

28 page booklet

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

MMcDermottC1119618-161216-03

Transcription

EVIDENCE in CAMERA

VOLUME 4
NUMBER 3

JULY 19TH 1943

ISSUED BY AIR MINISTRY A.C.A.S. (1)

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY

[page break]

EVIDENCE IN CAMERA

1. This O.U.O. document may be issued to Officers' Mess and Station Reference Libraries. (K.R. & A.C.I. 882, 2236(c), 2287.)

2. The only legitimate use which may be made of official documents or information derived from them is for the furtherance of the public service in the performance of official duties.

3. The publication of official documents, information from them, reproduction of extracts or their use for personal controversy, or for any private or public purpose without due authority is a breach of official trust under the OFFICIAL SECRETS ACTS, 1911 and 1920 and will be dealt with accordingly. (K.R. & A.C.I. 1071, 1072, 2238).

4. Copies not required for record purposes should be disposed of as Secret Waste in accordance with A.M.O. A.411/41.

SEE FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS ON BACK OF COVER.

[page break]

[cartoon]
[underlined] "You [/underlined] should know when to stop talking, too!"

49

[page break]

HEAVY ATTACKS ON COLOGNE
[photograph]
When COLOGNE was attacked by Bomber Command aircraft on 28/29.6.43 and 3/4.7.43 a large percentage of the great area of devastation on both sides of the Rhine was caused by fire. This night photograph, showing fires and sticks of incendiaries burning, was taken by an aircraft flying over Mulheimer Hafen (A), Humboldt-Deutz Motoren A.G., submarine engines (B). Ver. Westdeutsche Waggonfabriken A.G. (C) and Deutz Locomotive Depot (D).

50

[page break]

[photograph]
Railway communications in COLOGNE sustained severe damage. Rolling stock and buildings at the Deutz Locomotive Depot and Carriage Sidings (A and at D on previous page) were destroyed and the extensive chemical works (B) of Chemische Fabrik Kalk G.m.b.H. were damaged by H.E. and fire. Strassen Bahnof Ost (C), 'bus depot, was extensively damaged.

51

[page break]

[photograph]
In early 1942 sheds which occupied the site (A) at the Gereon Goods Depot, COLOGNE, were severely damaged and the sheds were rebuilt to a simpler plan. (See page 19, Vol. 3, No. 1.) In the recent attacks 75 per cent, of the adjoining buildings (B) were destroyed. Considerable damage was also caused to the Engine Sheds and other buildings (C) attached to the railway sidings.

52

[page break]

[photograph]
Lying beneath the smoke from buildings still burning at KALK are the wrecked premises (A) of Klöckner-Hamboldt Deutz Motoren A.G. (Internal combustion engines) whose workshops at Deutz {see night photograph, page 50) were also heavily damaged. Gottfried Hagen A.G., U-boat accumulators (B) and large sheds at the Kalk Sud Goods Depot (C) were severely damaged.

53

[page break]

[photograph]
It is estimated that at least 1,000 acres of the centre of COLOGNE, west of the river, have been 75 per cent. devastated. Warehouses on each side of the Rheinau Hafen are among the hundreds of destroyed buildings in the area photographed.

54

[page break]

[photograph]
The roof of the Main Railway Station (A) at COLOGNE was seriously damaged. The photograph reveals that damage to the North Transept (B) of the Cathedral is nothing like the extent alleged by the enemy. Black smoke (C) is still rising from this devastated area which includes the Town Hall (D) and Post Office (E) both damaged in the latest attacks.

55

[page break]

CONCENTRATION OF BOMBS ON AIRCRAFT FACTORY
[photograph]
A heavy concentration of bomb bursts on and around the target photographed during a daylight attack on the S.N.C.A. de L'Ouest Aircraft Factory at NANTE CHATEAU BOUGON by 61 aircraft of U.S.B.C. on 4.7.43. The target (outlined) is enveloped in smoke from many direct hits. Damage caused in the attack is seen on the next page.

56

[page break]

[photograph]
Damage to the S.N.C.A. de L'Ouest Aircraft Factory at CHATEAU BOUGON is very severe. At least fourteen direct hits have destroyed over half of the main building (A) and a number of smaller buildings and stores of material have been seriously damaged. This factory is engaged on aircraft repairs and is connected with Chateau Bougon airfield (B) by a wide taxi-track (C). Five He IIIs are seen in the factory yard (D).

57

[page break]

U.S.B.C. ATTACK ON LE MANS
[photograph]
During a concentrated attack on the Gnome and Rhone Aero Engine Works and Airfield at LE MANS by U.S.B.C. on 4.7.43 bombs were photographed bursting on the works and sidings. The centre of the airfield is also covered with bursts. Inset shows the result of the attack, four direct hits on the main works and a large number of craters across the airfield.

58

[page break]

[photograph]
[photograph]
HEAVY BATTERY S.E. OF LE CREUSOT
A daylight photograph of a four-gun heavy battery S.E. of LE CREUSOT. Inset is a night photograph of the same battery taken during the attack on LE CREUSOT on 19/20.6.43. Three of the guns are in action and the gun flashes reveal ground detail which enables the position of the battery to be plotted. (A) Crew's quarters. (B) Intersection of road and hedge. (C) Woods.

59

[page break]

KNOW YOUR PORTS – COPENHAGEN
[italics] COPENHAGEN is the largest industrial centre of Denmark. As a result of an agreement between the Danish and German Governments it is not under such severe control as are the ports in other occupied countries. In spite of this the Germans have increased and are increasing their use of the port. Danish merchant shipping not yet seized by the Axis is laid up in the Sundkrogen, Kronlobs Bassin and the Nordhavn. (A) Main Station. (B) Goods Station and Sidings. (C) Engine Sheds. (D) Oster Port Station. (E) Terminus of Copenhagen-Malmo (Sweden) Train Ferry. (F and G) Burmeister and Wain Shipyard and Royal Naval Dockyard (see next page). (H) Copenhagen/See Seaplane Station. [/italics]
[photograph]

60 and 61

[page break]

[photograph]
The Royal Dutch Dockyard (A), a part of COPENHAGEN the Germans are not allowed to utilize, is employed solely for the construction, maintenance and repair of units of the Danish Navy, most of which are still under Danish operational control. Work is also carried out to a few train and car ferries under control of the Danes. The Burmeister and Wain Shipyard (B) and the Sondre Frihavn (see previous page) are used considerably by the Germans for the construction and repair of German merchant ships.

62

[page break]

PROMINENT LANDMARKS

[photograph]
Above: This islet, on which is a light tower and two other stone towers, is the largest and highest in the CASQUET group, six miles west of Alderney.

[photograph]
Right: Le Fort de la Latte was built in 937, repaired and enlarged in 1689. It is on the extremity of a small peninsula near CAP FREHEL and approximately twelve miles west of St. Malo.

63

[page break]

DESTRUCTION OF 750 TON U-BOAT
[photograph]
This 750 ton U-Boat was destroyed in the Atlantic Ocean when attacked twice by the same aircraft of Coastal Command. The U-Boat had the newly modified conning tower that provides an additional A.A. position aft. In this photograph of the first attack the splashes of the depth charges entering the water are seen straddling the U-Boat.

64

[page break]

[photograph]
Above and below: Subsidence of the explosions.
[photograph]

[photograph]
Splashes from depth charges entering the water in the second attack, made from port.

65

[page break]

STORAGE DEPOT FOR FOODSTUFFS
[photograph]
This Storage Depot at AUGSBURG is of standard design and similar ones are to be found near most German towns. Their function is to conserve supplies of foodstuffs for civilian and military use. The tall standardised buildings (A) are served by road and rail while the lower type of standardised buildings are at (B).

66

[page break]

NIGHT ATTACK ON LE CREUSOT
[photograph]
A night photograph taken during the attack on the Schneider Works at LE CREUSOT on 19/20.6.43. Two bursts of tracer are seen coming from flak positions in the vicinity (A and B) and reconnaissance flares are to be seen at (C). The Locomotive Machine Shops (D and E) were damaged in the attack.

67

[page break]

[photograph]

DORNIER Do 217
The Do 217, which has been coming into service in increasing numbers for some time, is now one of the standard bombers of the G.A.F.

[photograph]
Do 217s outside the Dornier assembly factory at OBEPFAFFENHOFEN near MUNICH. The netting-covered multiple shelter (A) is of an unusual type. Six or more aircraft are faintly visible through the netting. Dummy bushes (B) are being placed on the roofs of hangars and other buildings. Photographs of Do 217 in flight are from a combat film.

[photograph]

68

[page break]

[photograph]
Do 217s dispersed near covered aircraft shelters at DUON/LONGVIC.

[photograph]
[photograph]
Above and left: More Do 217s at GARZ/USEDOM on the Baltic coast.

69

[page break]

CONTINENTAL RAILWAYS
These oblique views of typical Continental railway stations, sidings, rolling stock and equipment were taken by Boston aircraft during attacks on 2.7.43.

[photograph]
The northern end of LILLE/LA DELIVERANCE Marshalling Yard with mixed goods stock in the forwarding sidings (foreground). The reception sidings and locomotive engine sheds are to the left middle distance.

[photograph]
Above: A train of flats carrying motor cars on the Dixmude-Ghent line near THIELT.

[photograph]
Left: The signal box at the Northern end of the forwarding sidings at LILLE/LA DELIVERANCE. Note the floodlighting platform and the burrowing junction line which leads to the engine sheds seen in top photograph.

70

[page break]

Right: A modern signal box controlling train movement at the western end of St. Peter's Station, GHENT
[photograph]

[photograph]
Left: This typical all-over roof is at COUTRAI Station.

[photograph]
Right: A modern signalling system controlling the exits from platforms at COUTRAI. The covered wagons are standing in the goods-yard for off loading (to and from road vehicles).

71

[page break]

PROBLEM PICTURE.
[photograph]
WHAT IS THIS?
Answer at Foot of This Page.

ANSWER TO PROBLEM PICTURE ABOVE.
An unusual type of wind-tunnel, for testing models of aircraft under flying conditions, at CHALAIS MEUDON, near Paris.

72

[page break]

(4405.) 31-9832. 2900. 19/7/43. 45.246.
C. & E. LAYTON LTD. London, E.C.4.

[page break]

EVIDENCE IN CAMERA

This weekly document will consist of a collection of illustrations varying in number in each issue according to the quantity of material of sufficient interest and suitable for reproduction that is received.

2. Requests for material to be included in this document should be submitted to Command Headquarters, who, after consideration, will submit them to Air Ministry, A.D.I.(Ph.). Any useful suggestions as regards contents will receive full consideration and will be welcomed.

3. Distribution is carried out by Air Ministry (A.I. I) and any requests for fewer or additional copies must be made through Group Headquarters who will ensure the maximum possible economy.

4. Under no circumstances must any of the illustrations be reproduced by Units in the British Isles. Further copies can be printed from the existing blocks and independent photographic reproduction would be a waste of material and labour to the detriment of the National War Effort.

5. The distribution of photographs to the general public is carried out through the Press who are supplied with photographs which have been specially selected for their general interest and have been published after careful consideration by the Security Branch and by the Ministry of Information; it is therefore unnecessary as well as undesirable to communicate any of the contents of this document, either directly or by discussion in public places, to persons not enjoying the privilege of serving in H.M. Forces.

6. The document has not been officially graded as Secret or Confidential in order that the widest distribution may be given, but Commanding Officers should use their discretion to ensure that the appropriate information is available only to those whose work will benefit.

7. The necessity for security cannot be over emphasised, for although this document is not marked Secret some of its contents may occasionally be of value to the enemy. Every care must be taken to prevent such information being disclosed.

Collection

Citation

Great Britain. Air Ministry, “Evidence in Camera Vol 4 No 3,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed July 17, 2024, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/27340.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.