Letter from David Boldy to his father

EBoldyDABoldyAD390905-0001.jpg
EBoldyDABoldyAD390905-0002.jpg

Title

Letter from David Boldy to his father

Description

Letter from David Boldy to his father about losing his father’s dog, Prince; applying to the Royal Air Force; and leaving the farm to move back to London as war looks inevitable. He comments that the city is calm and will send some photos of himself, Steve and Cecil.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1939-09-05

Contributor

Nicki Brain

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Two page handwritten letter

Language

Identifier

EBoldyDABoldyAD390905

Spatial Coverage

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

From D. Boldy.
59, Bathurst Mews,
Lancaster Gate,
London, W. 2.
5th September 1939.

My own darling Dad,

Thanks very much for your letter and all your news. I am glad to hear you are allright now. Poor little Prince, still the poor chap is out of pain’s way anyway. I wonder what was wrong with him. The mange could not have been the cause.

We are all getting on well. I have sent in my name for the R.A.F. and am waiting to hear from them. Meanwhile I hope to do some voluntary A.R.P. work. While [deleted] we [/deleted] I was working on the farm we all saw that war looked inevitable and [deleted fragment] so I came home to London as soon as possible. We have had two Air Raid warnings. The first one gave us a queer feeling as it took place just after the zero hour, we didn’t mind the second much. Hitler is completely mad. To torpedo an unarmed liner with women and children aboard is the damned limit, and apart from this the affect it will have on Americas [sic] is also to be considered. Hitler obviously won’t play the game.

Don’t worry about us. We will do our bit. London is calm, without any sign of panic

[page break]

whatsoever.

Except for a couple of thunderstorms the weather has been very good. We played bridge at Mrs Short’s [deleted] yester [/deleted] evening before last. We all had a good rest last night.

The snaps I took on the farm are very nice and we will all send you some as soon as possible. I hope you liked the postcard photograph of Cecil, Steve & I [deleted] on bik [/deleted] with our bikes, at Clacton.

No more to-day. God bless & keep you and bring you back safely to us. With lots of

love & kisses from your

loving son

[underlined] David [/underlined].

Collection

Citation

David Boldy, “Letter from David Boldy to his father,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed October 31, 2020, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/493.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.

Can you help improve this description?