1,700 Tons on Hanover - Emden is Hit Again

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Title

1,700 Tons on Hanover - Emden is Hit Again

Description

A newspaper article about attacks on Hanover and Emden. It is annotated 'No 12 27-9-43'.

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Type

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One newspaper cutting

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This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

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Identifier

SWilliamsonF1311249v10003-0017

Transcription

[inserted] No12 27-9-43 [/inserted]

THE DAILY MIRROR

1,700 TONS ON HANOVER – EMDEN IS HIT AGAIN

EMDEN, the German naval and U-boat base which was heavily hammered by Fortresses in daylight on Monday, was raided again that night, when home-based bombers were over Germany in “very great strength”.

Hanover, however, was the main target. Large fires were started in this vital rail centre, with its important war industries, on which 1,500 tons of bombs were rained in half an hour in the preceding night attack last Wednesday.

The force that went to Hanover, consisted for the most part of our heavy four-engined machines, and from the numbers engaged it can be assumed that about 1,700 tons of bombs were dropped.

The industrial town of Brunswick, fifty-three miles north-west of Magdeburg, on the main railway line from Berlin, was also bombed on Monday night, when thirty-eight bombers and one fighter were lost in widespread operations.

These included attacks by Fighter – Command intruders over North-West Germany and Holland. Seven enemy aircraft were destroyed.

By shooting down a Dornier, Wing – Commander J.R.D. Braham brought his personal score of destructions at night to eighteen, tying with Wing-Commander John Cunningham, of Croydon, London.

Four of the night’s seven fell to the County of Warwick Squadron, commanded by Wing-Commander B.R. O’B. Hoare, D.S.O., D.F.C. and bar, of Hove, Sussex.

[underlined] Sanctuary for Refugees) [/underlined]

An aircraft piloted by Sergeant H.J. Collins, of Hove, shot down two of the enemy aircraft which were about to land.

Attempts by the Germans to create “safety zones” for civilians may follow the weekend announcement that the Germans and Fascist Italians had “defined” an area in Central Italy as a “sanctuary” for refugees, according to Reuter.

This declaration is without precedent in modern warfare, although the idea is not new

The idea of the German and “Fascist” Governments is really an extension of the principle of the open city.

The matter is one which will no doubt receive the most earnest consideration of the Allies before they agree to accept the principle.

Citation

“1,700 Tons on Hanover - Emden is Hit Again,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed May 19, 2024, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/38144.

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