Letter from Bill Akrill to his mother

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Title

Letter from Bill Akrill to his mother

Description

Bill mentions events in Grantham and to an Oxford. The weather is holding them up (and probably at home as well). Does not expect to get leave for Christmas and only the occasional 48 hour leave. He did spend of day in Oxford, where he went to the theatre.

Writes about the second front and Mrs Roosevelt's speech. Bill also gives his opinions of Canadians (fine) and Americans (always complaining) that he has met.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1942-11-09

Contributor

Tricia Marshall

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Three page handwritten letter

Language

Identifier

EAkrillWEAkrill[Mo]421109

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

Sgt. Akrill,
c/o Sergeants’ Mess,
R.A.F. Station,
Upper Heyford,
Oxon.
Mon. 9.11.42.
Dear Mum,
Pleased you were able to get to Kelsey but sorry the journey was so bad and that you found them so busy. What a shame Auntie & Uncle having so much on their hands. I must write a few lines soon.
No I hadn’t heard about Grantham. I think they keep things like that in the background these days. A nasty story about the Oxford. Wonder if it was from Ossington. The boys who were there say they’re terrible old crates & not safe.
I expect the weather’s holding us all up - on the land and in the air. I believe we’re down to start flying next week but its quite certain that we won’t. Oh, fancy talking about bluestalks to [underlined] me [/underlined]! If I get a 48 I hope there
[page break]
will be some left. On the new sylabus [sic] we should have finished here in 9 weeks time so I’ll definately [sic] not be home for Christmas but should get a 48 before then tho’ an ordinary 48 ‘s no good for getting home.
No, we didn’t get a day off – not had one yet. Got off early last Monday but it wasn’t a great deal of good to me. Still I got the train to Oxford & we had a change of food, went to the theatre & were reminded that there [underlined] is [/underlined] a place where people are free & don’t all wear blue! Hoping to be able to catch the 5 o’clock bus one night to get in to see [deleted] some [/deleted] a good Opera that’s on this week.
I’ve got some photos but nothing to send them in. If I haven’t enclosed them in this, if you send an economy label I’ll patch up an old envelope. I’m sorry I’m looking so much like a wet week-end. Pity I hadn’t a Freugh one but a lot of them are on the Eastb. & Heyford ones.
Well the news these days is something worth listening too. [sic] Gosh, its terriffic [sic] isn’t it! The second front at last and more powerful than
[page break]
anybody had imagined. As long as we don’t sit back now and think that [deleted] now [/deleted] all is well!! I think there’ll still be something left for me to do when I’ve finished here. I’ve never believed in fancy sudden endings.
Did you hear Mrs. Roosevelt’s speech? I thought it was very good but I wondered if her dear boys over here appreciated it. I suppose its wrong but I’ve not a very good opinion of what I’ve seen of them so far. We’ve some of them & some Canadians here with us. The Canadians suffer our discomforts in silence but the Yanks are always cursing this & that – expecting their cissy New York luxuries in Army barracks of a small island at war and bragging about coming to win wars for “this God-darned country” Their sence [sic] of humour – NIL.
I haven’t got the coupons & I don’t know whether I shall manage it as our adjutant is a stickler.
If you could pop a couple of apples in with my pyjamas I’d be mighty grateful. I’m dying for one. Nice juicy one. Those Mrs Iliffe gave me were simply grand.
Love
[underlined] Bill [/underlined]

Collection

Citation

W Akrill, “Letter from Bill Akrill to his mother,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed April 2, 2020, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/18070.

Item Relations

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