Letter to George Stone's Wife from the Air Ministry

PStoneGB16010011.jpg

Title

Letter to George Stone's Wife from the Air Ministry

Description

The letter states that Ivy's husband has lost his life at Weiswampach in Luxembourg

Date

1945-07-20

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

One typewritten letter

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

PStoneGB16010011

Transcription

[Air Ministry Logo]

AIR MINISTRY
(Casualty Branch)
73-77 OXFORD STREET
W.1

20th July, 1945.

Dear Mrs. Stone,

A week or so ago, the Air Ministry wrote to you to say that owing to the lapse of time, it was unfortunately necessary to presume that your husband, Pilot Officer G.B. Stone, had lost his life on the 13th August, 1944.

You will remember that on the 29th December, 1944, the Air Ministry stated that seven members of the crew of your husband's aircraft had been reported as having lost their lives. Among some German documents secured by the Allies, we have found the official German record of the crash of the aircraft in which you husband was flying. The aircraft crashed at Weiswampach, Luxembourg, on the night of the 12th/13th August, 1944. Eight of the crew were killed and the body of another airman was found near the scene of the crash. This person belonged to an aircraft which crashed just over the border in Belgium. Although your husband's name was not mentioned the names of his seven companions were given. As the crew consisted of eight, I am afraid there is no doubt that your husband was the eighth person killed. The airman who was found near the scene of the crash from the other aircraft, was identified by the Germans as Flying Officer Hazard. The aircraft in which Flying Officer Hazard was flying crashed at Ouren, just over the border, in Belgium.

The German report did not give the place of burial but the official report of Flying Officer Hazard's aircraft state that he was buried at Daleiden, Germany.

Confirmation of this information has also been received in the form of a report from the Graves Registration authorities

/in

Mrs. G.B. Stone,
Nancyville,
Plantation Terrace,
Dawlish, Devon.

Citation

Great Britain. Air Ministry, “Letter to George Stone's Wife from the Air Ministry,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed December 3, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/28289.

Item Relations

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