Letter to prisoner of war John Valentine from his wife Ursula

EValentineUMValentineJRM430212-0001.jpg
EValentineUMValentineJRM430212-0002.jpg

Title

Letter to prisoner of war John Valentine from his wife Ursula

Description

Writes that future correspondence will be on letter forms which go by airmail and suggest schedule. She will continue with normal letters but they go overland from Lisbon and will take a long time. Describes recent activities including concert at Albert Hall. Concludes with news of new furniture and mentions that daughter recognises him in photographs.

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1943-02-12

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Two sided handwritten letter card

Language

Identifier

EValentineUMValentineJRM430212

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

Start of transcription

WRITE [underlined] VERY CLEARLY [/underlined] ON THE LINES TO AVOID DELAY IN CENSORSHIP
no 48
Feb. 12th 1943
[inserted] R&A 30/3
My darling Johnnie,
I’m afraid most of my correspondence in future is going to have to be on these forms. We have to cut down the amount of mail & only these letter cards will go airmail all the way. So I have arranged with your father that he and I will send one on alternate weeks, & on my off week I will write an ordinary letter, with photos when possible, which will have to go overland from Lisbon & will doubtless take ages. However I hope you will get them eventually. Last weekend Ann came to stay it was nice to have her, as ever. The high spot was a concert at the Albert Hall on Sunday afternoon, which I believe she really enjoyed. I know I did. Ba has taken a jolly photo of her which I am sending off in the next batch to you, also some of me & Frances in her new coat – not such good ones this time. Our antique walnut cabinet has arrived & is now installed in the sitting room where mother’s desk was. It is just as lovely as I thought & I am [underlined] very [/underlined] glad we have got it. I’m sure you will love it too. Heal’s have provided new locks & keys for 2 drawers but there are no handles on another, so I have asked them to look out for some for us. I have been playing squash with Mary Simmonds again today, quite a good game.
CONTINUE IN BOTTOM PANEL OVERLEAF
[page break]
[underlined] IMPORTANT: [/underlined] FOR A PRISONER IN GERMAN HANDS THE PRISONER OF WAR No. MUST BE CLEARLY SHOWN. IT MUST NOT BE CONFUSED WITH HIS BRITISH SERVICE No.
[underlined] PRISONER OF WAR POST [/underlined]
[post mark] [censor stamp]
RANK & NAME: Sergeant J.R. M. VALENTINE
PRISONER OF WAR No.: 450,
CAMP NAME & No.: STALAG LUFT III
COUNTRY: Germany.
FROM: Mrs JRM Valentine
Lido, Tenterden
Grove, London
NW4
[underlined] BOTTOM PANEL [/underlined]
So sorry to hear about the Bad Boy again, don’t give up trying, my darling. Frances now definitely recognises & names photos of me & other friends, so when she calls your photo “Daddy” she [underlined] must [/underlined] remember you, mustn’t she? She’s as bonny & fit as ever, & gets very thrilled by buses just now, hears them al long way off.
All my love to you, my dearest, Yours always & always
Ursula.

Collection

Citation

Ursula Valentine, “Letter to prisoner of war John Valentine from his wife Ursula,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed April 15, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/20010.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.