Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula

EValentineJRMValentineUM440326-0001.jpg
EValentineJRMValentineUM440326-0002.jpg

Title

Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula

Description

Number 153-12. Mentions that her letters are taking longer to arrive but that he has had three packages. Wishes that clothing parcel would turn up as he has not had one for nine months. Writes that after thaw it has snowed again but that conditions in camp are better than when they arrived. Mentions he is fit and still practicing his violin.

Date

1944-03-26

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Two page handwritten letter

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

EValentineJRMValentineUM440326

Transcription

STALAG LUFT III
[one word censored]
26-3-44
Darling Ursula: No mail to answer, unfortunately. Your letters are taking longer & longer to reach me as time goes on. 3 months is the average nowadays. However, I have 3 packages to acknowledge with gratitude eg 6 Violin “A” strings (will keep me going for some time now) book of 5 Violin pieces (I imagine you to be the anonymous donor. they are just right for my present state of proficiency); 4 bottles of Argotone. You have been really thoughtful and considerate in sending these things another proof of your constant endeavours to help me. I can’t thank you enough. I wish a clothing parcel would turn up. I haven’t had one since early last July. 9 mos ago. we are still in the grip of winter & experiencing more snow than ever before with drifts literally of several feet in height. At the beginning of the month it thawed & the camp eventually dried & drained itself to [inserted] a [/inserted] intolerable condition. Subsequently it became bitterly cold & 2 days ago started snowing in real earnest & is still doing so. In some ways the camp is better than when we arrived. Sanitary conditions are vastly improved & if somewhat crude are at least satisfactory. We also have a small theatre – each show has to be done 13 times to allow all to see it. Internally, we are well organised & every inch of available space used for something or other. The site & climate will never be improved of course, but the worst feature of the present [censored] . I am very fit, still grinding away at the fiddle conditions for the practice on which grow steadily more difficult as overcrowding increases, I think of you & Frances constantly & often lay to picture our reunion. I hope you are well & succeeding in all your labours with house. How I wish I could help. Hope no bombs fall near you. If so, you’d better retire to Devon and keep yourselves intact for me! Frank P still not heard from wife
Love, John
[page break]
[underlined] Kriegsgefangenenpost [/underlined]
An Mrs U.M. VALENTINE
“FELMERSHAM”
Empfangsort: BOTTRELLS LANE
Strasse: CHALFONT ST GILES
Kreis: BUCKS
Land: ENGLAND
Landesteil (Provinz usw.)
Gebuhrenfreil
[page break]
Absender:
Vor – und Zuname: J.R.M. VALENTINE
Gefangenennummer: 450

Collection

Citation

John Ross Mckenzie Valentine, “Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed February 22, 2024, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/19398.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.