Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula

EValentineJRMValentineUM420602-0001.jpg
EValentineJRMValentineUM420602-0002.jpg

Title

Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula

Description

First letter as a prisoner of war. Asks her to let him know how long she was in suspense with him missing before he was reported as prisoner. Writes of conditions in camp. Describes how pilot stayed with aircraft and allowed the rest of the crew to bale out. Asks he to get pilots parents address so he can write to them. Mentions items available and those missing in camp. Writes that they will now have a chance to live out lives together.

Creator

Date

42-06-02

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Two page handwritten letter

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

EValentineJRMValentineUM420602

Transcription

ADDRESS FOR REPLY
STAMMLAGER LUFT3
DEUTSCHLAND
[underlined] 2/6/42 No1 [/underlined]
My Darling Ursula, I am afraid that your weekend with Vera must have been sadly spoilt by the news that I was missing. I sincerely hope that you were not kept too long in suspense. Please tell me how soon you were told of our failure to return, how you took it & when they let you know that I was a prisoner. Luckily, I am safe & very well – absolutely intact & unshaken. You needn’t worry about me in the slightest – food is ample & good & to date the accommodation satisfactory. I am afraid that our skipper was not so fortunate. Before being forced to bale out we had 30 minutes of hell during which he behaved magnificently, cooly & resourcefully. [underlined] Thanks to him [/underlined] most of the crew are alive today with me. Would you ask the camp padre to send you the address of his parents for I want to write to them. I shall be able to write to you once a week but you can write to me as often as you like & send photos etc. At camp I had quite a store of tobacco, cigs, pipe, pouch, [underlined] socks & toothbrushes. [/underlined] I want the underlined badly – could you ask the padre if he could have all [inserted] my [/inserted] personal stuff sent to you. Although we will be apart until the war ends the chances
of our living out our natural span of life together are considerably greater than a few days ago - & it is a great load off my mind – we now have something concrete to look forward to – instead of hoping & fearing simultaneously. Look after little Frances and tell her her father still has his thumbs up.
Please number your letters (correctly!!)
All my fondest love, dearest, yours always

[page break]
[outside of POW letter]
Mrs U.M.Valentine
“LIDO”
Tenterden Grove
Hendon, NW4
England
JOHN. R. M. VALENTINE (Sgt)
1251404 (RAF)
[page break]

Collection

Citation

J R M Valentine, “Letter from John Valentine to his wife Ursula,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed September 16, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/19204.

Item Relations

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