Letter from Malcolm Payne to Doris Weeks

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Title

Letter from Malcolm Payne to Doris Weeks

Description

Starts with endearments and love talk and talk of pay parade. Mentions reconnaissance to Newark and has received her letter. Writes about how he now charges other to use his stuff as he is saving up. Talks of daily activities and that he has written to mother. Ends with endearments.

Creator

Date

1944-04-28
1944-04-29

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Six page handwritten letter and envelope

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Identifier

EPayneMHWeeksD440428-01

Transcription

[postmark]
[postage stamp]
Miss Doris Weeks,
37 Hawthorne Rd.,
Bunker’s Hill,
Lincoln
[page break]
[postmark]
[page break]
[Royal Air Force crest]
A417512
F/Sgt. Payne. M.H.
R.A.F. Stn.
Syerston
Nr Newark
Notts.
28-4-44
Darling,
I’m going to try and rake up enough news to partly compose a letter to you to fulfill [sic] my promise and because (and this is my main reason) because I love you so darling. Had it not been for Pay Parade (notice the capital letters) this morning I would having listening to your lovely voice now. Provided of course the boss didn’t rouse you and make you work.
Have you had enough sleep yet Pet? No! I haven’t either but I will certainly catch up on some here I’ll bet. Believe me though dearest I would much rather stay awake and be with you.
[page break]
xx
I think I may go into Newark tomorrow evening and find the station and where the bus to Lincoln leave from etc. Definitely no “bags” though kid. You know I wouldn’t anyway. I have lost my randiness since leaving you!!
Glad to see you have learned to use the word in your letters. The letter was waiting for me in the mess when I went down after being paid. You don’t know how much I look forward to recieving [sic] those darling. I do really.
Donald, by the way, has paid me my 3 quid
[page break]
xxx
and the way I’m saving now I’ll be able to get married before I know what I’m doing – If the boys wanted a stamp I used to let ‘em have it, use my boot polish, shaving cream and hosts of other small things. Now I charge them for stamps – hide my boot polish and come out with an emphatic NO when asked for other things. You see my darling – you are making a real Scotsman of me. But Heaven knows – don’t I like it. From you I mean of course.
We had an awfully
[page break]
xxxx
lazy afternoon. First off we had a weeny teeny “Pep” talk by the lady adjutant who I think made herself nasty. Another Bull – S. talk followed that [deleted] that [/deleted] then came the signing of an order book and so back to the old flea-bag for a nap – which I didn’t get. Damn it.
Darling, why can’t we be together while we’re having all this glorious weather.
I only wish it could be so and, sweet, I know for sure you do too. And that alone gives me the most marvellous feeling.
[page break]
xxxxx
I wrote another Air-Graph to mother lunch time and a letter tonight enclosing some post-cards which will undoubtedly interest her. I’m doing quite well in fact with my mail home now aren’t I?
Giving myself a huge pat on the back now aren’t I. I think the [deleted] [indecipherable word] [/deleted] pleasant surrounding are more conducive to letter writing anyway.
Pet, there isn’t any more news to write you but I could fill pages telling you I love you but I wouldn’t be able
P.T.O.
[page break]
X
tell you how much so I think I will finish.
Bye for now my only Darling
All my fondest love forever.
Malcolm
Xxxxxx
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XXX
[circled x]
X?
I love you X muph!
P.S. Notice how the writing deteriorates toward the end
xxx

Collection

Citation

Malcolm Payne, “Letter from Malcolm Payne to Doris Weeks,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed October 19, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/10575.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.