Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

EGortonHGortonLCM430816.pdf

Title

Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

Description

He writes of arrangements for his pending 48 hour leave, flying activities and the weather.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1943-08-16

Contributor

Tricia Marshall

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Five handwritten sheets

Language

Identifier

EGortonHGortonLCM430816

Coverage

Spatial Coverage

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

OFFICERS’ MESS.
ROYAL AIR FORCE,
CARK,
NORTH LANCASHIRE.
TELEPHONE GRANGE 390.
16/8/43
Dearest,
The parcel came this afternoon. Thank you very much, darling. I had been a little worried about it, as you’d said several days ago that you were going to post it.
I haven’t yet made formal application for my 48, but shall do so tomorrow. It will be on Tuesday & Wednesday of next week, but I shall try to wangle Thursday [deleted] off [/deleted] as my day off as well. I can’t promise that, but I’ll see what I can do, and as Bod will [deleted] by [/deleted] be C.F.I. that week (Basher on leave), I may be able to manage it.
[page break]
2.
If I can, I shall try to meet you in Manchester, probably at the bus stop, as I’m not sure how much time I shall have to go to London Road, so don’t wait for me at the station but go straight to the bus. If I can’t get off early, I shall go direct to Farnworth.
The weather has been simply filthy all day, & the grass where we park our aircraft is inches deep in water. If we fly tonight, which is more than a little doubtful, I shall put my gum boots on, because it’s no joke walking in that sort of grass in the dark.
I have written to Alice to thank her for the trouble she took about the furniture, & asking her to tell Mr. Dean to
[page break]
3
go ahead with the house. I’m inclined to agree with you about doing our own business ourselves in future, but when one is so far away, it seems a pity not to use people who are willing to help.
I’ve just realised that, all being well, I shall be with you a week tonight. Jolly good, isn’t it?
Get a camp bed if you think it would be worth it, but I don’t quite see why we need one, as we’ve already got your divan in case we should want to put anyone up.
I nearly had a taxying
[page break]
4
accident today! I was taxying out of dispersal on to the perimeter track, and the wind caught me as I was turning, & kept swinging me round. Perhaps you remember trying to taxy when it was windy.
Owing to the rain, there was water on the brake drums & my starboard brake wouldn’t work, so I just swung round, off the perimeter track, & came to a halt in a shallow ditch that some workmen had dug. Fortunately, there was no damage done, not even a scratch. The only sufferer was my amour propre!
[deleted] [indecipherable words] [/deleted]
Roll on Monday.
All my love,
Harold.
[page break]
Thursday
Dearest,
Sorry I didn’t get your letter off first thing this morning, but I was too tired at 2.30 a.m. last night to cycle round to the Mess to post it, & I didn’t get up until midday.
I’m very much tempted to send your watch with this parcel but I’ll play safe & keep it until I meet you.
All my love,
Harold

Collection

Citation

Harold Gorton, “Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed May 19, 2019, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/9120.

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