Prisoners of war - some questions answered

SJenkinsonLP1316403v10031.jpg

Title

Prisoners of war - some questions answered

Description

Instructions about sending food parcels. How, food, what could be sent, costs, donations, addressing. Concludes with reasons why parcels not addressed to individual prisoners.

Date

1942-01-01

Temporal Coverage

Coverage

Language

Type

Format

One page printed document

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

SJenkinsonLP1316403v10031

Transcription

War Organisation of the
BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY AND ORDER OF ST. JOHN OF JERUSALEM
Prisoners of War Department, St. James’s Palace, London S.W.1
1st JANUARY 1942
BRITISH AND DOMINION PRISONERS OF WAR
Some Questions Answered
(NOTE: Please note that the information contained in this leaflet is subject to change from time to time)
FOOD PARCELS
1. How can food be sent? Only by this Organisation, which aims at providing each prisoner and interned civilian in German or Italian hands with one food parcel every week.
2.'What does a food parcel contain? Biscuits, cheese, chocolate, fish, fruit or puddings, jam or other

preserves, margarine, 2 meats, milk, sugar, rea, vegetables, soap and a vitaminised food are sent in

every parcel. Also selections from other commodities such as Bernax, cocoa, creamed rice, curry

powder, custard, Marmite, meat paste, mustard, oatmeal, Ovaltine, pepper, sweets, etc., as space

permits. The food is specially planned to supply what is lacking in the German camp rations.


3. What is the cost of the 'weekly parcel? Including tobacco and cigarettes (see paragraph 13) the price to the Red Cross and St. John is approximately 10/0d.This does not include the cost of conveyance by Red Cross ships from Lisbon to Marseilles and cost of insurance against losses due to enemy action.
4. If a donation cannot be given, will a Prisoner of War- be sent a parcel? Yes, food parcels are sent for all Prisoners of War and interned civilians, and are paid for from the general funds of the Red Cross and St. John.
5. How are the parcels addressed? They are sent to the International Red Cross Committee at Geneva, which forwards them to the camps for distribution by the British Camp Leader.
6. Why are parcels not addressed to individual Prisoners?

(a) Because prisoners may be moved from camp to camp.

(b) If part of a consignment of parcels is lost, the remainder can be divided between
camps. .

(c) To ensure that new prisoners may receive parcels before their names reach London.

(d) As the parcels sent in each consignment contain similar articles, there is no advantage gained by addressing each parcel to a Prisoner of War by name.

Citation

War organisation of the British red cross society and order of St John of Jerusalem, “Prisoners of war - some questions answered,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed November 26, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/30629.

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