Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

SBakerDA19210428v20145-0001.jpg
SBakerDA19210428v20145-0002.jpg

Title

Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

Description

Feeling more cheerful with the first spring weather. Had received no mail from home. Discusses address of someone's relatives in England who had put him up and he had not thanked because he became a prisoner. Mentions attending lectures and that there were two Rhodesian tobacco farmers there. Says it does not look like he would see them until after the fifth year and they would not recognise him from the 19 year old who left home.

Creator

Date

1944-04-08

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Handwritten prisoner of war letter form

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

SBakerDA19210428v20145

Transcription

[underlined] Kriegsgefangenenpost [/underlined]
[inserted] [underlined] MIT LUFTPOST AB KAIRO [/underlined] [/inserted]
[ink stamp]
[date stamp]
An MRS. C. BAKER
CHARLTON
Empfangsort:
Strasse: INYAZURA
Kreis: SOUTHERN RHODESIA
Land: SOUTH AFRICA
[two ink stamps]
[underlined] Gebührenfrei! [/underlined]
Absender:
Vor- und Zuname: F/O. DONALD A. BAKER
Gefangenennummber: 665
Lager-Bezeichnung: M.-Stammlager Luft 3
[underlined] Deutschland (Allemagne) [/underlined]
[page break]
8TH April 1944
My Dearest Mother, Today is the first of real spring weather & is really marvellous especially after such a protracted winter. We all feel much more cheerful on days like today Expect we shall be hearing the cuckoos soon although I cant see anything to rave about in their call. No mail from you since last writing but shall probably have a month to wait and then receive four together again. You probably did not receive my letter asking for the address of I.Y.Rs relatives in England, as youve [sic] never mentioned it. They wrote to me in England offering to put me up for a weekend there, and I kept putting off thanking them until I became a prisoner. However they’ve probably forgotten that by now. I have been attending a few lectures per week on agriculture, but as usual with me its in one ear & out of the other. This section of the camp seems to be quite a seat of learning – lectures all day & everyday on all kinds of subjects. There are two [deleted] [indecipherable letter] [/deleted] Rhodesian tobacco farmers here – Ray Hill & Coulland-Cooper both from Banket Area I think. Well mother I expect this will reach you about July, near enough four years since I left home, and Im [sic] afraid it looks as if I shan’t see you much before the end of the 5TH. You will probably hardly recognise me as, if age counts for anything, I should be a man, & I left you at 19. No doubt Charlton will have changed too – with the jacaranda trees on the drive fully grown. Ive [sic] no doubt it all looks lovely & I get so impatient waiting to see you all again. Anthony is pretty fit & Ken Wilson is OK. having just recovered from a dose of ‘flu. Im [sic] in the best of health & hope this finds you all the same. Your loving son Donald.

Citation

D Baker, “Letter from Donald Baker to his mother,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed December 4, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/25730.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.