Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

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Title

Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

Description

Writes that he had had no mail for six weeks and that there must be some hold up; however, English mail was arriving again. Catches up with family/friends news and says his letters must be boring as nothing happens. Writes of his camp rugby team playing in a neighbouring camp but he was not picked to go. Mentions poor weather and how he does not appreciate 'cheer-up endings to letters from people writing in comfort. Glad his mother does not do this.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1943-11-14

Contributor

Sue Smith

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Handwritten prisoner of war letter form

Language

Identifier

SBakerDA19210428v20033

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

[post marks and other rubber stamps]

MRS. C. BAKER
CHARLTON
INYAZURA
SOUTHERN RHODESIA
SOUTH AFRICA

F/O DONALD A BAKER
665
[page break]

14.11.1943

My Dearest Mother, Its nearly six weeks since the last letter from you, but no one has heard from home for at least that time so there must be a general sort of hold up. English mail has started to come through again and I had a few yesterday including one from Wilf & Gertie. They seem to be pretty cheerful. I hope my mail to you is coming through O.K. It must make pretty dull reading but this is such a boring place to write from. Our camp Rugby team was allowed, by special concession, to go the next camp about ¼ mile away and play a match. Our side won which makes this “lager”[?] the champions. I did not go across as only about 10 spectators went, but would like very much to have done so as there are about a dozen Rhodesians there. Those who dis go were so excited by the outing that it took them about 3 days to get down to the usual humdrum existence of camp life. The weather has been simply awful, with[?] overcast sky rain & cold, which all tends to make things very depressing I am very glad you never finish your letters with such things as “cheer-up” etc. I suppose about half the letters we get end that way & it is just about maddening when one is in the depths of gloom & general misery to get a letter from someone sitting in an armchair with a big fire in front & a hot drink beside them saying “cheer-up it wont be long” It wont be long has been written to prisoners since the war started. Cheerhio[sic] for now dear mother am keeping quite well & do hope youre[sic] all the same & to hear from you soon. Your loving son Donald.

Citation

D A Baker, “Letter from Donald Baker to his mother,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed January 25, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/25719.

Item Relations

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