Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

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SBakerDA19210428v20124-0002.jpg

Title

Letter from Donald Baker to his mother

Description

Mentions arrival of latest letter and complains about poor literature which a person sends. Writes about character of people in camp and why he liked to change camps. Does not think he would move again before the end of the war. Mentions getting depressed and lack of home news.

Creator

Date

1943-08-24

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Handwritten prisoner of war letter form

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

SBakerDA19210428v20124

Transcription

[date stamp]
[underlined] Kreigsgefangenenpost [/underlined]
[inserted] [underlined] MIT LUFTPOST AB KAIRO [/underlined] [/inserted]
[three ink stamps]
[date stamp]
An MRS. C. BAKER
CHARLTON
Empfangsort: INYAZURA
Strasse: SOUTHERN
Kreis: RHODESIA
Land: SOUTH AFRICA
[underlined] Gebührenfrei! [/underlined]
[date stamp]
Absender:
Vor- und Zuname: P/O DONALD A. BAKER
Gefangenennummer: 665
Lager-Bezeichnung: M.-Stammlager Luft 3
[underlined] Deutschland (Allemagne) [/underlined]
[date stamp]
[page break]
24:8:1943.
My Dearest Mother, Only one letter from you since last writing, June 15TH, but as I know you write regularly they should come through, in time. I was rather amused at what you had to say at Anthony’s remarks about Miss Chris Knowles. It does seem bad us grumbling at voluntary work for us but his opinion is really quite general here. Very likely it is the people who receive her orders for things for prisoners who are responsible for sending us poor literature etc. I don’t know if I will have lost my “amiable disposition” that you mention, but Im [sic] sure that we cannot help changing a lot after two years confinement. I think we mostly become more quiet as I’ve notice that, and rowdy fellows are not really very popular. They get on ones nerves so I do think that we become more tolerant. It’s the only way to get along living in the same room with the same fellows doing the same thing day after day & month after month. That’s why I like a change of camp because there’s a change of scenery & for the first few days a new place is comparatively delightful because of new things to look at. I don’t think I’ll be moved again before the end of the war. One cant help getting depressed at times but we derive a certain amount of satisfaction even from the German news these days & new prisoners are our only source of home news. This letter sounds like complaining the whole time, but I didn’t mean it that way. Only I know you’re interested in what this is like. However I should think the effects will wear off with time & seeing you all again in peace. Much love, dear Mother. Donald

Citation

D A Baker, “Letter from Donald Baker to his mother,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed July 6, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/25710.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.