Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents

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Title

Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents

Description

Writes that summer is over and mention planting seeds. Mentions that there are some nice gardens locally and that their garden would compete with grandad's. Garden is her chief joy which is why she mentions it in many letters. Wonders about the future and relationships. Catches up with news of family and friends. Eagerly awaiting his next letters.

Creator

Date

1942-10-01

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Two page handwritten letter and envelope

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

EHudsonP-HEHudsonJD421001

Transcription

[front of envelope]

Prisoner of War Post

[inserted] 186 [/inserted]

[stamp] BY AIR MAIL PAR AVION

[postmark] BURNLEY & NELSON LANCS 3.15PM 1 OCT 1942

[postage stamp]

Kriegsgefangenenpost

755052 Sgt. J. D. Hudson

Interned British Airman

Camp Militaire

Laghouat

Algerie

Afrique du Nord

EXAMINER 6654

[page break]

[rear of envelope]

From

Mrs Hudson

191 Halifax Road

Nelson

Lancs.

1/10/42

[post mark]

[inserted] 85 [/inserted]

[inserted] 13-11-42 [/inserted]

[inserted] On board [/inserted]

OPENED BY

[page break]

85

191 Halifax Road

Nelson Lancs.

England

Thursday Oct. 1st/42

My dear Douglas

This is a pleasant Autumn morning & I am wondering if it is cooler & pleasant with you too. We have reluctantly bid Goodbye to summer now. The lawns look damp & are covered with worm casts which means that mowing is [deleted] at [/deleted] almost at an end for this year. I have grown some Canterbury bells from seed & on Tuesday I planted them “into their flowering quarters” (says she optimistically). There are one or two very lovely gardens around here, tended like children by elderly retired gentlemen. They seem to be quite tickled by my enthusiasm & always stop to have a word in passing. The Canterbury bells seemed to be rather an idea to them I don’t think they had just realised the possibilities. Do you remember what a lovely display Grandad Hudson used to have at Chestnut Grove? I believe Dad thinks mine will compete favourably. I seem to be always writing gardens & books to you but they are my cheifest joys in these days of enforced separation. We have some beautiful thrushes in the gardens & I never see one without recalling the one on the gate in the Cheshire Lane. Weren’t we both thrilled with it?

[page break]

I wonder if you are recalling too, those pleasant days three years ago, when we wandered happily along the lanes gathering blackberries. In your letter of July 22nd you wonder if you will want to settle down around home when you return to it. I don’t think so. The present abnormal conditions are only a phase which will pass & pleasure in travel will return bringing no doubt greater realisation of joy & blessing. I often wonder if you & John will resume the old happy relationship. John says yes. I hope so too. You will both bring into the association new thoughts & ideas & a much wider outlook. I am looking forward to seeing John tomorrow. The last [deleted] night [/deleted] [inserted] time [/inserted] was when we were at Kensal & he brought Eric, from London, along to see me, one morning shortly after we heard that you were safe. It must be nearly two years. I am eagerly awaiting more letters. The last ones July 27 - 21 - 22 in that order. I am hoping to receive snaps too. In a previous letter I told you I had been able to buy a sponge [inserted] to send to you [/inserted] & now consider I was very lucky to get one cheap. There was one in a chemist’s window in town yesterday 13/11. In happier days we could have bought a similar article for 1/-. Before this letter reaches you I hope to have sent another next - of - kin parcel & will try to get shirts with collars attached. Goodbye now once again. With all our love & thoughts & prayers from Mother & Dad.

755052 Hudson

Camp Militaire.

Laghouat Algerie.

Collection

Citation

P Hudson, “Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed September 26, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/23804.

Item Relations

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