Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents

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Title

Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents

Description

Five weeks since last letter which would have been worrying without cables. Describes autumn weather. Wonders what food he has now that fruit is finished and mentions availability of tomatoes at home. Reminisces over Christmas and catches up with news of acquaintances. Talks of fathers schedule and finishing letter to go shopping.

Creator

Date

!941-10-24

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Two page handwritten letter and envelope

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

EHudsonP-HEHudsonJD411024

Transcription

[OPENED BY EXAMINER 4168 label] Prisoners of War Post.

[BY AIR MAIL label] [postmark] [postage stamps]

755052 Sgt. J. D. Hudson
Interned British Airman
Camp Militaire
Annale
Algerie
Afrique du Nord.

[page break]

From
Mrs Hudson,
191 Halifax Road
Nelson
[underlined] Lancs [/underlined]
England.

10-12-41 [postmark] [censor stamp]

[page break]

78 191 Halifax Road
Nelson [underlined] Lancs: [/underlined]

My dear Douglas. Friday 24/10/41

This is a very cold day in October & I am just sitting by the fire to try to get warm before setting out to do my shopping so thought I could write a few lines to you. Not because there is anything new to tell you. It will be five weeks tomorrow since we had a letter from you. It has seemed a very long time & would have been a cause for anxiety if it were not for the assurance of well-being brought by the cables. I am going to send you one tomorrow & do hope I can tell you of letters received by morning post. We have enjoyed very pleasant Autumn weather these few days with clear skies & bright sunshine but this morning is raw & cold & we’ve just had a shower of rain. I suppose you have cooler weather, too, now, & I hope it is proving more comfortable than the intense heat mentioned in your last letter of August 28th. I often wonder what food you have now. The fruit, no doubt, is getting done, & I do hope you are able to have palatable substitutes. My grocer still brings tomatoes & says he expects to be able to supply them until Christmas.: Christmas! The name is so often in my thoughts now as it so rapidly

[page break]

approaches & though it will not be a festival of joyous reunions as in the old days the Spirit of Christmas will mean a great deal to us & we shall recall again with tender love & faith the Star of Bethlehem bringing its message of hope to each one of us. I had a very happy little surprise on Wednesday when I met Mr Exley. He was travelling in the district & just stopped the car to go into one of the mills as I was passing. He asked very kindly about you. & sent you all good wishes. It is quite an easy journey from his home to here by bus & we arranged for Mrs Exley & Barbara (four years old on Oct. 15th) to come along for a day & Mr Exley would call for them in the late afternoon. We had a nice letter from Miss Law yesterday. She said she had written to you, to the address at Le Kef. I do hope it will be sent on to you. It is not quite light when Dad leaves home in the mornings now, but he has been getting back about [deleted] a [/deleted] 5-30 to 45 each evening. He is on duty Saturday night (I dread that) & has to walk home all the way Sunday morning. It takes about an hour. Now love I’ve got nicely toasted warm so I will say Good bye to you & proceed to do my shopping. The sun keeps peeping out of the clouds so perhaps it will keep fine for me. & I quite enjoy the trip. All our love & thoughts & prayers 755052 Sgt. J. D. Hudson from Camp Militaire Mother & Dad. Annale Algerie North Africa.

Collection

Citation

P Hudson, “Letter to Douglas Hudson from his parents,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed December 7, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/23376.

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