Letter to Douglas Hudson from his mother

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Title

Letter to Douglas Hudson from his mother

Description

Delighted to receive his letter of 1st September and noted that it was in order with no deletions. Her investigations showed there was no quick way to get news to prisoners of war and suspected he would not get this letter until after the new year. Reminisces and mentions how kind people were and that there were many letters from friends. Catches up with news of family and friends. Comments on weather and flowers. Many people want his address so they can write. Is very happy to know he is alright.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1940-11-06

Contributor

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Two page handwritten letter and envelope

Language

Identifier

EHudsonP-HEHudsonJD401106

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

Prisoners of War Post.
[postmark]
[VA7 stamp]
[postmark]
755052 J. D. Hudson Sgt Chef
British Prisoner of War
Camp De Sejour Suirfeille
S/Courent. Commandant- D’armes
LE KEF.
Tunisia
Nord Afrique
[page break]
[inserted] Received or answered [underlined] 21-12-40 [/underlined] [/inserted]
[postmark]
From
Mrs Phyllis Hudson
10 Moorside Road
Kersal
Salford
Lancashire
England
[postmark]
[page break]
[deleted] J. D. HUDSON [two indecipherable words] [/deleted]
[inserted] The post office advised me to put your address on the letter like this. So sorry about untidiness. A stupid pen. [/inserted]
J. D. HUDSON (SGT. CHEF)
CAMP. DE. SEJOUR SUIRFEILLE
S/COURERT COMMANDANT D’ARMES
LE KEF. TUNISIE.
NORD AFRIQUE.
Wed. Nov. 8th.
My dear Douglas.
It was with the greatest joy that we received your letter (dated Sept. 1st.) this morning. It was in perfect order with no deletions, & I’m ever so thankful to learn that you are well & that you are all together. We have made many enquiries how to let you have news as quickly as possible but there does not appear to be any quick route for letters to “prisoners of war” & I’m afraid you will not get this before the New Year is here. But all the long time that we have all waited so anxiously & eagerly for news, we have [indecipherable word] of loving thoughts & wishes to & from each other. Always now we are looking forward to peace & reunion. Happy memories, too, brought comfort
[inserted] From 10 Moorside Rd.
Kersal
Salford. Lancs England [/inserted]
[page break]
during those days of great sorrow & anxiety & the people around here were most kind & sympathetic. We had such lovely letters from friends & Vera has promised to write to you “funny” letters as soon as she has an address. When Hildred knew you were safe she came to see us on the Sunday morning & promised to write to you when an address was available. So when 1941 is here you should get letters from several people who can send great news to you. Today I’ve been to town & called to see Mr Statham. Strangely enough he has been up to see me (his card was waiting for my return) so I must send him a line to tell him you are safe & well. Ted Hole wrote a few weeks ago that he was coming into this district & could he come to see us. Of course I assured him of a warm welcome but now a [deleted] letter [/deleted] [inserted] later [/inserted] letter says he is not being moved after all. He wants your address so you will have his news before long. Well love I am so happy to know you are all right & to be able to tell you that things are going on practically normally here. Today is very Novemberish but the lawns are a lovely green colour & we have still got a few flowers in bloom. Do you remember the chrysanthemums from Mrs Hopwood. One of them has grown to be a bush & is now covered with yellow bloom.
I understand from the P. Office at Manchester that I can send as many letters as I like so you may expect them regularly after this. If this letter takes as long as yours to reach it’s destination it will be well into the New Year & all our love & wishes come [inserted] to you & our wishes to your companions too. Now love goodbye for the present. All love from Mother & Dad [/inserted]

Collection

Citation

P Hudson, “Letter to Douglas Hudson from his mother,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed May 7, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/23056.

Item Relations

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