Letter from Douglas Hudson to his parents

EHudsonJDHudsonP-HE400901.pdf

Title

Letter from Douglas Hudson to his parents

Description

Writing from Tunisia that he is perfectly well as are the others. He is keeping letter simple in order not to write anything that may prevent the letter being delivered. Mentions the current climate and availability of grapes, figs, olives and peaches but no green grass. Continues to write about food and local officials. Mentions he will be glad when the time comes to go home. Suggest they contact the Red Cross to enquire how to write to him. Says he is OK for cigarettes and clothes. Enclosed is score-sheet

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1940-08-01

Contributor

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Five page handwritten letter, envelope and handwritten document

Language

Identifier

EHudsonJDHudsonP-HE400901

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

[postmark] [ink stamp]

[underlined] PRISONERS OF WAR POST [/underlined]

Sept. 1st 1940

MR. H.E. HUDSON
10. MOORSIDE ROAD.
KERSAL.
SALFORD. 7.
LANCASHIRE.
ANGLETERRE.

[censor label] J.M.E

[page break]

[censor label] P.C. 66
OPENED BY

[page break]

[Red Cross rubber stamp]

J.D.HUDSON. (SGT. CHEF)
CAMP DE SEJOUR SUIRVEILLÉ
S/COUVERT COMMANDANT D’ARMES
LE KEF
TUNISIE
NORD AFRIQUE.

Sunday. 1st Sept. 1940.

My Dear Mother & Dad,
I am writing this letter to you on Sunday afternoon with the very sincere hope that it will reach you all right.

I am perfectly well and so are the other two, and although we had to arrive in this part of Africa we were in no way hurt. I am trying to make this letter as simple as possible because they only speak French and Arabic here and I do not wish to write anything

[page break]

2.

which might prevent this letter being delivered.

I do hope that you are both keeping well and I do trust that you will have been informed previously where we were and that we were safe.

The climate here is about the same as our hot summer weather, so far no hotter. Grapes, figs, olives & peaches grow all over the place but there is no green grass, plenty of rough mountains.

We managed to swim in the sea at first, which was terrifically salty & quite warm, but more inland there is no swimming. I think that

[page break]

3.

the least [deleted] is [/deleted] I say, the better.

We do some of our own cooking now & by that means can prepare English food. There is plenty of bread, and eggs & tomatoes seem to be plentiful. Fortunately we can now make tea – how we missed that at first.

The officials here are very kind, they cannot speak French, & accordingly we have to make every effort to improve ours. We fully appreciate their position & I am sure they appreciate ours.

I am not going to write a lot because I do want this letter to get through to you. This is the most important because it lets you

[page break]

4.

know that we are safe.

There is no need to say how glad I shall be when the time does arrive to come home again. At the moment I feel to be just an idle onlooker, quite helpless & I do hope you are both safe. I get a French newspaper each day & therefore learn some things.

I expect if you wish to write back it will be best to enquire from the Red Cross. It may take a long time.

I must say cheerio now. Remember me to everybody concerned & explain that I am interned here but quite well. I am O.K. for cigarettes & clothes etc so

[page break]

Do not worry about sending anything. Whether I shall be moved from here I do not know.

Hoping that this letter will arrive safely, and that you are both keeping well and cheery.

Good-bye for the present. and all the best of luck.

Love

Douglas.

[page break]

[card game score card]

Collection

Citation

James Douglas Hudson, “Letter from Douglas Hudson to his parents,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed May 7, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/22468.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.