Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

EGortonHGortonLCM430821.pdf

Title

Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

Description

He writes about the weather and looking forward to seeing his wife on leave.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1943-08-21

Contributor

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Three handwritten sheets

Language

Identifier

EGortonHGortonLCM430821

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

OFFICERS’ MESS,
ROYAL AIR FORCE,
CARK,
NORTH LANCASHIRE.
TELEPHONE GRANGE 390.
21/8/43
Dearest,
You will excuse me if this letter is a bit incoherent, as the thought of seeing you on Monday has driven everything else out of my mind.
I’m writing this in bed at 10.30 a.m. I was flying last night until 2.30, - a lovely night & I was almost sorry to stop. Now, as usual, it’s pouring down outside, so I don’t feel in a hurry to get up.
I’m sorry you didn’t get your letter this morning. I discovered at lunch time yesterday that I’d forgotten to post it, & by then it was too late. Still, you’ll have two letters on Monday.
I shall be in Farnworth on Monday evening. On second
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2
thoughts I don’t think I shall be able to get away early enough to meet you in Manchester, so I shall see you at home. The pub you get off at is called the Black [underlined] HORSE [/underlined], & don’t you forget it.
When I hear the rain pounding on my hut, & you talk about sitting in the sunshine, it makes me mad. We occasionally get spells of about 12 hours when it doesn’t rain, but all the rest of the time it’s pouring down.
In case I forgot to mention it, Alice is sending the bike.
You must certainly take jolly good care not to catch this flu. I can’t have you being ill, because you are too precious to me. [deleted] for that [/deleted]. Of course, if you choose to be ill when you should
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3
be coming on 48, it’s adding insult to injury!
But take very good care of yourself, darling, for my sake, won’t you?
All my love,
Harold

Collection

Citation

Harold Gorton, “Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed July 25, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/9123.

Item Relations

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