Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

EGortonHGortonLCM430729.pdf

Title

Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife

Description

He writes about his social activities and flying over Bobbington, near Wolverhampton and Rhyl.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Date

1943-07-29

Contributor

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

Four handwritten sheets

Language

Identifier

EGortonHGortonLCM430729

Spatial Coverage

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

OFFICERS’ MESS,
ROYAL AIR FORCE,
CARK,
NORTH LANCASHIRE.
TELEPHONE GRANGE 390.
29/7/43
Midnight.
Dearest,
I’m Oi/c tonight, so am using a quiet period to write this overdue letter. I shouldn’t have done this until the week after next, but the C.F.I. thinks that the P/O who’s been doing it this week is too inexperienced.
I was going to write to you last night, but I fell by the wayside. Yesterday morning I cycled out to Esthwaite, a very nice ride of about 15 miles & set off back at 8.0 p.m.
After I was more than halfway back, I met Stockdale & Sinclair, who dragged me back with them to the Swan at Newby Bridge, & then to the King’s Arms at Cartmel. – Quite a pub crawl, in fact. To crown it all, we went to Engel’s house in
[page break]
2
Cartmel for supper, and reached camp at midnight. By that time I’d cycled about 35 miles, & was feeling worn out, although I think it did me good.
This morning I went to Bobbington, near Wolverhampton. There was broken cloud at 1000 ft when we started, but over the sea (from Lytham to Rhyl) we were down to 300 ft, & trying to give ships a wide berth in case they were flying balloons – Quite a dice, I can tell you. At Rhyl I climbed up through the cloud, 5 or 600 ft thick, intending to turn back because of the Welsh Hills, but S. of Liverpool it was O.K., and we had a very good journey back in the afternoon.
Your letter gave me a thrill today. I’m delighted to think we’ve actually got some
[page break]
3
chairs, let alone a saucepan! What shakes me about your life at the moment is the straits you are put to to get into Aber. The sooner you live in a civilised place, the better, I think. It’s not too bad in this sort of weather, but it would be hopeless in winter.
The watch I’m not quite sure about yet. Twice it has lost time, once 5 minutes & once 1/2 hr., so I’m giving it a thorough check before I consider sending it to you. Perhaps by then it will be time for our 48, if the days will only pass quickly enough!
I’ll try & fix the petrol for you, but my biggest trouble will be finding a bottle, I expect.
I’ve got the perspex ring,
[page break]
and will finish it when I can.
[deleted] I’m [/deleted] Mother sent me the letter from Kingston, but there was no hurry, so I’m enclosing it with this.
I take a poor view of this way of spending a night. When I think that I could be with you instead of being stuck in this office until about 6.0 a.m., it’s enough to make one weep.
Still, perhaps the more I do this, the sooner I shall be able to be with you permanently, because that’s what I want. It’s pretty dim being away from you darling.
All my love,
Harold.
PS. Dad apologised for not having had enough time to write to you!

Collection

Citation

Harold Gorton, “Letter from Harold Gorton to his wife,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed May 13, 2021, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/8965.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.