Two cuttings and an article: 50,000 prisoners taken in Tunisia, Cape Bon peninsula blockaded, article Giraud and de Gaulle

SValentineJRM1251404v10068.jpg

Title

Two cuttings and an article: 50,000 prisoners taken in Tunisia, Cape Bon peninsula blockaded, article Giraud and de Gaulle

Description

Cutting 1. Headlines: 50,000 prisoners taken in Tunisia, three German divisional commanders, Luftwaffe withdrawn from battle, resistance breaking up. Cutting 2. Headlines: Cape Bon peninsular blockaded, intense activity by the navy, aircraft attack trapped enemy without respite, heavy fighting near Tunis. Article headlines: Giraud and de Gaulle, meeting places proposed.

Date

1943-05-10
1943-05-11

Temporal Coverage

Language

Type

Format

Three newspaper cuttings mounted on a scrapbook page

Publisher

The Times
IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Identifier

SValentineJRM1251404v10068

Transcription

THE TIMES MONDAY MAY 10 1943

50,000 PRISONERS TAKEN IN TUNISIA

THREE GERMAN DIVISIONAL COMMANDERS

LUFTWAFFE WITHDRAWN FROM THE BATTLE

RESISTANCE BREAKING UP

CAPE BON PENINSULA BLOCKADED

“INTENSE ACTIVITY” BY THE NAVY

AIRCRAFT ATTACK TRAPPED ENEMY WITHOUT RESPITE

HEAVY FIGHTING NEAR TUNIS

THE TIMES TUESDAY MAY 11 1943

GIRAUD AND DE GAULLE

MEETING-PLACES PROPOSED

It was made known yesterday that General Giraud had invited General de Gaulle to meet him either at Marrakesh of Biskra, in Algeria. The invitation was given in a note handed to General Catroux on April 27, in reply to the French National Committee.

In his note General Giraud said:- “After this meeting, with our agreement concluded, we will go together to Algiers and start on our work without any looking back.” He emphasized the necessity of complete agreement on the point that the French people, once they were liberated, would have to form a Provisional Government according to the means provided by law.

In a broadcast yesterday General Giraud announced a new war loan to help to arm the French forces in Africa.

“We need still more arms,” he said. “France is no longer vanquished – she is on the road to victory.”

General Giraud has accepted proposals by General Catroux under which he and General de Gaulle would preside over a French executive committee in turn, Algiers Radio said last night.

The committee itself would have the power to decide all essential matters until France is liberated, and there would then be substituted for it a provisional government selected through the general councils. The assembly of general councillors would, however, set a date for a national election to be held when all war prisoners and workers deported to Germany had returned to France.

Algiers Radio pointed out that the method of selecting a provisional government was laid down in the Constitution of 1872. – [italics] British United Press. [/italics]

Citation

“Two cuttings and an article: 50,000 prisoners taken in Tunisia, Cape Bon peninsula blockaded, article Giraud and de Gaulle,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed January 24, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/22018.

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