Sgt Edward Nevill's DFM newspaper reports

NNevillG160511-01.jpg

Title

Sgt Edward Nevill's DFM newspaper reports
Hounslow Airman Honoured

Description

Six newspaper cuttings referring to the award of a DFM to Edward Nevill and giving details of the conduct which led to the three crew being awarded medals.

Date

1940

Temporal Coverage

Language

Type

Format

Six newspaper cuttings

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Identifier

NNevillG160511-01

Transcription

HOUNSLOW AIRMAN HONOURED

Sgt. E.G. Nevill, D.F.M.

Sergeant E.G. Nevill, of the Royal Air Force, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal for conspicuous service. Not yet 20 years of age, he is the son of Mr. Edwin J. Nevill, of “Keyford,” 79, Cromwell Road, Hounslow, late head postmaster of East Grinstead. Mr. Nevill is a well-known member of the Heston and Isleworth Philanthropic Society.

The British bombers, of which Sergeant Nevill was a member of a crew, were reconnoitring the enemy’s back areas at a height of only 50 feet when three Messerschmitt 109’s were sighted about 150 feet higher. Sergeant Nevill, the rear gunner, holding his fire until the fighters were within close range, replied to each attack with a series of short bursts, while his pilot, taking violent evasive action, skimmed the housetops of villages as he made for the coast.

One Messerschmitt 109, closing to within 300 yards of the bomber’s tail, was caught by a well-directed burst from the rear gun and dived headlong to the ground. At the coast the two remaining enemy machines broke off the engagement and turned back.
¬_

The crew of one British bomber, reconnoitring the enemy’s back areas at a height of only 50ft., sighted three Messerschmitt 19’s [sic] about 150ft. higher.

Held His Fire

The British rear-gunner, holding his fire until the fighters were within close range, replied to each attack with a series of short bursts, while his pilot, taking violent evasive action, skimmed the housetops of villages as he made for the coast.

One Messerschmitt 109, closing to within 300 yards of the bomber’s tail, was caught by a well aimed burst from the rear gun and dived headlong to the ground. At the coast two remaining Messerschmitts broke off the engagement and turned back.

Printed and Published by The Daily [missing letters]

_

Former Frome Postmaster’s Son Honoured

Sergeant E.G. Nevill, of the Royal Air Force, has been awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal for conspicuous service. Not yet 20 years of age, he is the son of Mr. Edwin J. Nevill, of “Keyford,” 79, Cromwell Road, Hounslow, who for five years was head postmaster at Frome. Sergeant Nevill was born in Frome and spent the first five years of his life here. The British bombers, of which Sergeant Nevill was a member of a crew, were reconnoitring the enemy’s back areas at a height of only fifty feet when three Messerschmitt 109’s were sighted about 150 feet higher. Sergeant Nevill, the rear gunner, holding his fire until the fighters were within close range, replied to each attack with a series of short bursts, while his pilot taking violent evasive action, skimmed the housetops of villages as he made for the coast. One Messerschmitt 109, closing to within 300 yards of the bomber’s tail, was caught by a well-directed burst from the rear gun and dived headlong to the ground. At the coast the two remaining enemy machines broke off the engagement and turned back.

_

DISTINGUISHED FLYING MEDAL

NEVILL, 610339, SERGEANT EDWARD GREVILLE.
SPENCER, 580466, SERGEANT ALAN.

In June Flight Lieutenant Batt was the pilot and Sergeants Nevill and Spencer the observer and rear gunner respectively of an aircraft which successfully carried out a single aircraft reconnaissance. Throughout the whole operation the aircraft was flown at a height of less than 200ft., and enemy troop concentrations were located and subsequently attacked. Flight Lieutenant Batt successfully completed the mission in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire, which severely damaged his aircraft. Sergeant Spencer was wounded during the operation, but continued to use his gun, also making valuable visual reconnaissances. Sergeant Nevill, by his skilful handling of his gun, beat off an attack by three Messerschmitt 109s. It is believed that one was destroyed. This crew has taken part in 11 operational flights since May 10, and they have at all times displayed courage and determination in the face of the enemy. Their excellent team work has largely contributed to the success of many of the missions entrusted to them.

_

The crew of another bomber, reconnoitring the enemy’s back areas at a height of only 50 ft. sighted three Messerschmitt 109’s ahead.

The fighters at once dived to the attack, one closing in on either quarter and the third approaching directly from astern.

Pressing home their attacks at short range they then broke away, and while one fighter continued to attack from astern, the remaining two, working as a pair, kept up a series of diving assaults on each quarter in turn.

The British rear-gunner, holding his fire until the fighters were within close range, replied to each attack with a series of short bursts while his pilot skimmed the housetops and scattered villages as he made for the coast.

FLEW BACK

One Messerschmitt was caught by a well-aimed burst from the rear gun, turned over on its back and dived headlong into the ground.

The running fight continued until the coast was reached, when the two remaining Messerschmitts broke off the engagement and turned back.

Immediately the bomber pilot turned his aircraft about and completed his interrupted reconnaissance in full.

_

[underlined] Flew at 200 Feet [/underlined]

Flight-Lieutenant Robert Batt was the pilot, and Sergeants Edward Nevill and Alan Spencer, the observer and air gunner of an aircraft which successfully carried out a single aircraft reconnaissance.

Throughout the whole operation the aircraft was flown at a height of less than 200 feet, and enemy troop concentrations were located and subsequently attacked.

Flight-Lieutenant Batt successfully completed the mission in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire which severely damaged his aircraft. Sergeant Spencer was wounded, but continued to use his gun. Sergeant Nevill, by skilful handling of his gun, beat off an attack by three Messerschmitts. It is believed he destroyed one.

Flight-Lieutenant Batt has been awarded the D.F.C., and Sergeant Nevill and Sergeant Spencer the D.F.M.

Collection

Citation

“Sgt Edward Nevill's DFM newspaper reports,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed November 27, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/18684.

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