Cap Gris Nez, Edward King's 10th operation of his tour

SKingEJ182986v10046.jpg
SKingEJ182986v10047.jpg
SKingEJ182986v10048.jpg
SKingEJ182986v10049.jpg

Title

Cap Gris Nez, Edward King's 10th operation of his tour

Description

Four items, Edward's description of the operation against a gun battery, his navigation plot, a map showing the target and newspaper cuttings describing cross channel operations and heavy explosions.

Creator

Date

1944-05-08
1944-05-09

Temporal Coverage

Language

Format

Handwritten document, map, newspaper cuttings

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Contributor

Identifier

SKingEJ182986v10046, SKingEJ182986v10047, SKingEJ182986v10048, SKingEJ182986v10049

Transcription

[underlined] Cap Gris Neg [/underlined]
[underlined] Naval Gun Battery. [/underlined]
[underlined] 8/5/44. [/underlined]

Airborne 2225
[underlined] Landed 0050 [/underlined]

Full Moon.
Target seen whilst still over England. Bombed visually. No flak.
The White Cliffs of Dover looked fine in the Moonlight.

[page break]

[map]

[page break]

[map]

[page break]

BIGGEST BANGS OVER CHANNEL
Dover windows smashed
Express Staff Reporter

DOVER, Tuesday. - The heaviest explosions ever heard on the South Coast since the war began shook houses, people into the streets just before midnight.
A few minutes beforehand Allied bombers had been heard passing over South-East Coast towns.
The explosions began with loud A.A. fire; then the ground trembled, violent bangs shook walls and shattered glass.
Flashes were seen as vividly as when the German long-range guns go into action.
The explosions continued at the rate of about five a second, reaching the intensity of rapid gunfire.
The R.A.F. were believed to be dropping blockbusters. The tremors came from the direction of Calais and the Dunkirk areas.
During the day Allied bombing on the other side of the Straits was intense.
Aircraft moved over in an intermittent procession. Before lunch several formations of heavies passed over; within a few moments explosions shook the Dover front; in Folkestone doors were jarred open.

COAST ROCKED BY FRENCH EXPLOSIONS
FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT
South-East Coast Town, Wednesday.

Some of the heaviest explosions of the war rocked South Coast towns last night.
Soon after dark heavy explosions from the French coast shook houses in Dover. Windows rattled and doors vibrated.
Flashes were seen while the explosions were occurring. R.A.F. planes were heard crossing the Straits and returning, apparently in a concentrated attack on the Calais area. They seemed to be running a shuttle service.
This was the heaviest attack heard on this side of the Channel since the days just after Dunkirk. The explosions continued for nearly half an hour.
Shortly after 11.30 there was a further series of explosions, lasting without a break for 15 minutes.
They were so violent that houses shook at Folkestone and other towns.
Soon after midnight there were others, even heavier than before. For nearly a minute at a time, windows and doors shook violently. This attack lasted for about 10 minutes.

Citation

Edward King, “Cap Gris Nez, Edward King's 10th operation of his tour,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed November 27, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/34395.

Item Relations

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