Cochran Field

MStimpsonMC155249-190922-09.pdf

Title

Cochran Field

Description

A book detailing the activities undertaken at the training airfield of Cochran. It describes the history of the field, the training courses and names the staff and students.

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Spatial Coverage

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One printed book

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IBCC Digital Archive

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This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

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MStimpsonMC155249-190922-09

Transcription

[Embossed Crest]
COCHRAN FIELD
Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center
1942

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ARMY AIR FORCES

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WINGS over America

For their assistance in furnishing pictures and editorial assistance for this volume and their co-operation in numerous other ways, grateful acknowledgment is made to the following: Public Relations Office, Army Air Forces, Washington, D.C.; Public Relations Office, Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center, Maxwell Field, Alabama; Gulf Coast Army Air Forces Training Center, Randolph Field, Texas; Public Relations Office, First District, Army Air Forces Technical Training Command, Miami Beach, Florida.

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Foreword
As members of the United States Armed Forces, you do not have to be told of the magnitude and importance of the task that lies before you.
At every base, station, and training field of the United States Army Air Forces, you are preparing yourselves for the great test of arms which will prove that the forces of democracy can destroy the evil power of the totalitarian nations.
Soon, you will take your places, as Bombardiers, Navigators, Pilots, and Gunners, alongside of our allies who have been fighting so valiantly. As mechanics and supply personnel, and in every type of ground duty, you will have the vital responsibility of making sure that our airplanes will be second to none.
We can win this war, and we will win it, but only if every officer and enlisted man puts forth all the fortitude and resourcefulness that Americans have always displayed in time of war.
There are trying times ahead, times that will test the mettle of all of us, but I am confident that the personnel of my command will acquit themselves with honor and distinction, no matter where and when we shall meet the enemy.
[Signature]
Lieutenant General, U.S. Army.
Commanding General, Army Air Forces.
by Lieut. General H.H. Arnold

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LIEUTENANT GENERAL HENRY H. ARNOLD
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Captain Beck, Lieutenant Arnold, Captain Chandler, Lieutenant Milling, Lieutenant Kirtland.

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1908 Orville Wright
First flight September 5, 1908.

With the reorganization of the aviation setup of the United States Army, on March 9, 1942, has come the latest phase of the development of the nation’s military aviation from its groping, experimental days to its present status as an autonomous unit within the structure of the Army.
The story of the rapid growth of our nation’s military aviation, from an unimportant subdivision of the Signal Corps before the first World War, through the period when it was a corps of its own, the Air Corps, and now to a degree of tremendous importance as the Army Air Forces, co-equal in prominence with all the other Army combat arms combined, is a stirring saga of courage and inspiration, of indomitable will and far-sighted genius, all within the short space of 33 years.
The utilization of aviation by the Army, however, antedates 1909, the official birth year. Civilian aeronauts made observations from captive balloons for the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War, and later the Army purchased a balloon in France which was used in Cuba during the Spanish-American War.
It was not, however, until the experiments of Langley, Maxim, Lillienthal, Bleriot, the Wrights and others had focused attention on the possibilities of heavier-than-air machines did the Army consider seriously this newest military adjunct. It was not until the Wrights had demonstrated that a heavier-than-air machine was not only feasible, but practical did the Army advertise for bids for the construction of an airplane. An aeronautical division of the Army was created in the Office of the Chief Signal Officer of the Army on July 1, 1907.
The Wright brothers produced an airplane which was delivered to Fort Myer, Virginia, on August 28, 1908. It as a biplane with a wing spread of about 40 feet and a wing area of some 500 square feet weighing approximately 800 pounds. The lateral controls were affected by warping the wings. The double elevator and the rudder were supported in front of the wings by an outrigger. The landing gear consisted of two runners, or skids, and the plane was launched from a monorail. After a series of disappointing accidents and many tests, the Board of Officers appointed to examine the plane made a favorable recommendation on August 2, 1909, and the Chief Signal Officer approved the recommendation the same day. This date is considered the birthday of the Army Air Forces.
While thus inaugurating the air arm of the service on this date, the value of aircraft in a military way was not immediately apparent, particularly to a nation at peace, and it was not until March, 1911, almost two years later, that Congress for the first time specifically appropriated money for aviation…to the tune of $125,000. By September, 1913, Army aviation had grown slowly until it had 17 planes, with a personnel of 23 officers and 91 enlisted men.
Inasmuch as the original conception of the role of aircraft in warfare was purely that of observation the control of military aviation was left in the hands of the Signal Corps, and indeed aviation remained in this branch until 1918, when it was divorced from the Signal Corps and expanded into two departments – the Bureau of Military Aeronautics and the Bureau of Aircraft Production. Upon the termination of the war these two departments were consolidated into the Air Service.
The first actual use of aircraft by the Army began in March, 1916, when the First Aero Squadron, composed of 16 officers, 77 enlisted men and eight airplanes began operations with the Punitive Expedition in Mexico.
The World War, of course, with its constantly accelerating emphasis

Wilbur Wright at Fort Myer, July 27, 1909.
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Orville Wright in flight, Maxwell Field, 1910.
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The DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARMY AIR FORCES

upon air power, was responsible for the rapid expansion of the American aviation. By the time of our declaration of war upon Germany in April of 1917, Army aviation consisted of 65 officers (35 of whom were flyers, 1,087 enlisted men and 55 airplanes. No better commentary can be made upon the changing role of air power at the beginning of the World War and of the present conflict than to compare this number with the 10,697 officers, 126,660 enlisted men and 8,707 aviation cadets which we had on June 30, 1941, with the number constantly increasing under the impetus of the greatest expansion program in history.
During the first eight years of its existence, 1909-1916 – a total of 142 airplanes had been delivered to Army Aviation. Congress, in July of 1917, appropriated $640,000,000 for Army Aviation, the largest appropriation which had ever been made up until that time for any single purpose. Working as rapidly as possible, the country began the gigantic task of catching up in production with countries long at war. The first task as to train American flyers and for this purpose flying schools and ground schools were set up at a number of schools and colleges. Nearly 15,000 flying cadets received training in this country, and about 1,800 in Europe. By March, 1918, our Army Aviation strength was 11,000 officers and 120,000 enlisted men.
At the time of the Armistice we had 757 pilots, 481 observers with 740 planes and 77 balloons at the front, and 1,402 pilots, 769 airplanes and 252 balloon observers had entered the Zone of Advance.
While at the time of the Armistice less than 25 per cent of the planes flown by American pilots were of American manufacture, we were already beginning to swing into large scale production, principally of British designed DeHavillands and Handley-Page’s equipped with the American Liberty motor, the greatest contribution of American manufacturers to the war effort.
American aviators were officially credited with the destruction of 491 enemy airplanes, of which 462 were accounted for by 63 aviators. We had 43 squadrons at the front at the time of the Armistice.
Following the conclusion of the war, our air strength was allowed to dwindle to 1,000 officers and 10,000 men.
The Army Reorganization Act of 1920 provided for 1,516 officers and 10,300 enlisted men for the Air Service, and the Air Corps Act of 1926 authorized a “Five Year Program” which contemplated at its conclusion a personnel strength of 1,650 officers and 15,000 enlisted men with 500 cadets, and equipment consisting of 1,800 serviceable planes.
On March 1, 1935, the famous GHQ Air Force was established, embracing all tactical Air Corps Units within the Continental United States. Prior to its formation combat squadrons were trained under widely different methods, depending upon the conceptions of the Group Commanders. The purpose, which was accomplished, of the GHQ Air Force, was to coordinate the systems of training so as to produce uniformity and the ability to operate together as a team. Another accomplishment was the later development of the combat crew as a fighting team. In practice, the same officers and men were assigned to the same airplane, and each team, through constant cooperation and practice, was able to attain a high degree of efficiency.
Even more important than all these innovations, however, was the fact that the Air Corps, as it was known then, was, for the first time, under a unified command, and under an air officer, Major General Frank M. Andrews (now a Lieutenant General in command of the Caribbean Defense Command). Here was another notable step toward the fullest development of our Army Air arm as an independently functioning entity, complete within itself.
This organization of air power into a highly mobile striking force of great unified power had, as its backbone, the function of Bombardment. The GHQ Air Force was divided into three Wings.
The First Wing, with headquarters at March Field, California, comprised two Bombardment Groups, one Attack Group, and two Reconnaissance Squadrons.
The Second Wing, with headquarters at Langley Field, Virginia, comprised two Bombardment and two Pursuit Groups, and two Reconnaissance Squadrons.
The Third Wing, at Barksdale Field, Louisiana, was composed of one Attack and one Pursuit Group.
But even this organization was to be changed soon by the pressure of ever-increasing expansion of our Army Aviation. On June 23, 1941, the Army Air Forces was established. These included the Headquarters, Army Air Forces, the Air Force Combat Command (which superceded the GHQ Air Force), the Air Corps and all other air

They Flew Them When. – Major H.H. Arnold, Major Thomas Dewitt Milling, pioneer military aviators, and Army planes of 30 years ago – taken in 1912 when Army air strength consisted of two planes.
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Burgess Tractor – 1914.
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Early Curtiss Training Plane No. 30 – at North Island, San Diego, California

WORLD WAR NO. 1 AND OUR

units. At the same time an Air Council was created to review and coordinate major Army aviation projects. The Air Council included Assistant Secretary of War for Air, Robert A. Lovett (ex-officio). Lieutenant General H.H. Arnold, president of the council, Lieutenant General Delos C. Emmons, Major General George A. Brett, and the Chief of the War Plans Division of the War Department General Staff.
In addition to his duties as Deputy Chief of Staff (Air), General Arnold became Chief of the Army Air Forces. General Emmons was made Chief of the Air Force Combat Command, and General Brett, Chief of the Air Corps.
At the end of May, 1941, the Ferrying Command was organized to speed up the process of getting bombers to our English allies. Originally under the command of Colonel Robert Olds (now a Brigadier General in command of the Second Air Force at Spokane, Washington), it is now commanded by Brigadier General Harold L. George, and designated Air Transport Command. Since Pearl Harbor its activities have been vastly expanded into a huge world-wide organization engaged in the transport of all types of aircraft, plus supplies, equipment, and personnel to all the fighting fronts.
By the final reorganization, or “streamlining” which took place last March, the Air Corps ceased to exist, even as a purely administrative organization, and the Combat Command was eliminated, as well. The various combat Air Forces, which are complete units of themselves, are now directly under the command of overall field commanders such as General MacArthur, another step forward in unified command. It is interesting to note that many of these field commanders, whose commands comprise all arms of the service, are themselves air officers, such as General Andrews, in the Caribbean. Each Air Force is, of course, commanded by an Air Force Officer, of general grade, whether within the continental United States or overseas.
These combat forces include all units of military aviation such as bombardment, interception (fighter squadrons), observation, and ground-air support, together with the necessary maintenance service.
As a result of the March 9 change, the Air Forces are recognized as one of the three elements of the Army, together with Ground Forces and Supply. This new organization, designed to simplify and speed up the chain of command, and to provide the flexibility and efficiency of operation necessary to accomplish the enormous task that lies ahead, designates Lieutenant General H.H. Arnold as Commanding General, Army Air Forces, and also as Deputy Chief of Staff for Air on the Army General Staff. By the same reorganization, Lieutenant General Joseph T. McNarney, one of the ablest American air strategists, was made Deputy Chief of Staff.
In addition to these two officers, however, the Air Forces have a far greater representation than ever on the General Staff. As a matter of fact, the General Staff, as now constituted, is about one-half composed of officers from the Air Staff.
The Air Staff, which is rather like a Staff within a Staff, and which is a purely Air Forces organization, is similar in general outline to the General Staff, but on a slightly smaller scale, with designations such as A-1, A-2, etc.
The complexity and extension of Army aviation from its simple Signal Corps days until the present is no better illustrated than by a brief review of the various branches of the Air Forces. The overall picture of the Army Air Forces organization may be summed up under four key words: Policy, Forces, Operations and Commands.
The Policy function has already been discussed at the start of this article. It is handled by the Commanding General of the Army Air Forces and the Air Staff, plus the Air Forces participation in the Army General Staff. In addition to the Assistant Chiefs of the Air Staff (A-1, A-2, A-3 and A-4), there is an Air Inspector.
The various Air Forces, which are the combat organizations of the Army Air Forces, have been covered in paragraphs above.
The next group in the logical breakdown of the Army Air Forces organization is the Operations Staff; this is divided into Military Requirements, Technical Services, and seven administrative agencies: the Public Relations Officer, Director of Personnel, the Air Surgeon, Air Judge Advocate, Budget Officer, Director of Management Control, and Military Director of Civil Aviation.
Now for the fourth element of the organization of the Army Air Forces: operating directly under the Commanding General of the

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Army Air Forces, seven great commands compose the last stages of Air Forces preparation for combat units. It may be of interest to outline the functions of these various Commands.
1. The MATERIAL COMMAND. Experimental aviation activities, which were carried on at Washington by a few technicians prior to the World War, were concentrated at Dayton, Ohio, on November 5, 1917, under the command of Colonel V.E. Clark, Signal Corps. The laboratories, located at McCook Field, were supplemented by offices in Dayton. In 1926 the Air Service became the Air Corps and the functions of supply, procurement and maintenance of aircraft were added to this division, and the name changed to “Material Division.”
The location of the division was changed from McCook Field to Wright Field in 1926.
The Material Division has figured directly or indirectly in nearly all important aircraft developments, commercial as well as military. It is the great experimental and testing branch of the Air Force and includes among its many accomplishments superchargers, the “Whirlwind” engine, use of ethylene glycol for high temperature cooling, high octane gasoline, vibration control, metal propellers, night and instrument flying, haze penetrating film for aerial photography, night and color photography, and many other developments.
2. THE FLYING TRAINING COMMAND. While the Headquarters of the Air Corps Training Center began to function at Duncan Field, San Antonio, Texas, in 1936, flying training in the Army has been continuous almost since the purchase of the first Wright airplane in 1909.
The first Army flying school was established at College Park, Maryland, in October, 1909. Lieutenant Frank P. Lahm and Frederick E. Humphreys were the first students of the Wright brothers. Lieutenant Lahm later became a Brigadier General and commanded the Training Center from its inception in September, 1926, until August 31, 1930. This veteran flyer is now Air Officer of the Second Corps Area at Governors Island, New York. Among the first five Army aviators were Lieutenant H.H. Arnold, now Lieutenant General. Among them also was Lieutenant Benjamin D. Foulois, now Major General, retired. General Foulois became a Brigadier General at the age of 38 as Chief of the Air Service of the First Army, American Expeditionary Force. He became a Major General and Chief of the Air Corps on December 20, 1931.
The function of the Flying Training Command, is, of course, to co-ordinate and direct the immense job of providing officers and men for the vastly expanding Air Forces. In order to accomplish this with the greatest efficiency and to eliminate the possibility of administrative bottlenecks, General Arnold set up the Flying Training Command, as it now exists, under the command of Major General Barton K. Yount, with headquarters at Fort Worth, Texas. This command is divided in three great regional training areas, one in the Southeast, on in the Gulf Coast region, and one in the Southwest. All of these regional training areas are complete within themselves, providing their own Reception Centers, Replacement Centers, Primary, Basic, and Advanced Schools (for pilot trainees), and Navigator Schools. Bombardier trainees, however, are all sent to schools located in the Southwestern part of the country, where weather conditions are best

AIR FORCE STRENGTH GROWS

Top Picture: 213th Aero Squadron, Second Army – Enlisted Men. Bottom Picture: Officers and Planes – N. 13 Pursuit Squadron, Third Pursuit Group.
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Captain C. Def. Chandler and Lieutenant Roy. T. Kirtland – in Wright Type B airplanes with Lewis machine gun, June 7, 1912. – The first machine gun ever fired from airplane (Lieutenant Kirtland was pilot for test).
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for this particular type of training. The Flying Training Command also provides for instruction in fixed and flexible gunnery.
3. The TECHNICAL TRAINING COMMAND. The first effort to train Army aviation mechanics systematically was during the early days of the World War, utilizing state universities and civil technical schools. The system was a failure, due to the large costs involved as well as other reasons. Therefore, the Aviation Section, Signal Corps, established schools at St. Paul, Minnesota, and at Kelly Field, Texas. The Kelly Field school was discontinued after the Armistice.
In 1921 the school was moved to Chanute Field, Illinois, and in 1922 the Photographic School, at Langley Field and the Communications School, at Fort Sill were consolidated with it.
The school outgrew its area and in 1935 another site was sought for a second school, and a second school was established at Lowry Field, near Denver, Colorado.
The present expansion program of Army Aviation has necessitated the further expansion of the mechanic training program in order to provide the ever increasing Air Forces with an adequate supply of trained mechanics, particularly in view of the fact that engines and equipment are constantly becoming more complex as well as progressively more modern.
The Technical Training Command provides technical training for Army Air Forces personnel not trained by the Flying Training Command. Under this category come not only ground crew personnel,

Lieutenant Henry H. Arnold in Wright B airplane, College Park, Maryland, 1911.
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such as mechanics, but also such aircrew members as the aerial engineer and communications officer.
4. The AIR TRANSPORT COMMAND, as discussed previously, is concerned with air transport, for military use all over the world.
5. The AIR SERVICE COMMAND operates air depots, repairs aircraft, and distributes aircraft, equipment, and supplies to air units in the United States.
6. The TROOP TRANSPORT COMMAND transports air-borne troops and equipment, parachute troops and equipment, and tows troop- and cargo-carrying gliders.
7. The PROVING GROUND COMMAND operates proving grounds to test aircraft and equipment.

AIR COMBAT
It is quite probable that it is entirely too soon to attempt to define the role of the airplane in relation to the other combat forces of a nation. In spite of that fact there has been raging, and indeed still goes on, a debate between those who feel that air power has to a large extent superceded sea power and even land power as the deciding element in modern warfare, and those who feel that this extreme theory has yet to be supported by actual facts. There are extremists who argue, like the Russian designer Seversky and the Italian General Douhet, that the day of the surface fleet is over, and that the future wars will be decided by the relative merits of the air forces of the combatants. On the other hand, we have the sure evidence of the failure of bombing alone either to permanently disrupt the war effort of a country or to terrorise its civilians into demands that its government surrenders. In neither the Spanish Civil War nor in this war, up until the present, has it been possible for the advocates of air power alone to prove their contentions.
At the same time it must be granted that no nation has as yet been able to mount the type of air attack envisioned by those who hold that it will be air power that will decide the war. It seems likely, however, that this theory will be given a thorough test before the war is done.
Certainly it is true that the conception of the airplane has already undergone a remarkable series of changes since the beginning of the World War, when it was regarded not in the light of a combat weapon at all. Indeed the first airplanes used in the World War were almost always of one type, a two-seater designed for reconnaissance work. As the war progressed specialization appeared and a class of airplanes designed first for air fighting then for bombing appeared. Several nations, prior to the war, has experimented with the arming of aircraft with machine guns, but on the outbreak of the war no plane on the front was so armed. Rifles, carbines, pistols and hand grenades were carried by the pilot and observer. The tactics of air fighting were rudimentary. The pilots simply flew close to the enemy and when within range the pilot and the observer blazed away with any weapon they happened to have handy.
In the summer of 1915, belligerants began to mount machine guns in the planes, usually on a swivel bar at the back of the observer’s seat. The observer could only fire the gun backward toward the tail of the plane, firing over the pilot’s head, which made for a very restricted zone of fire. This necessitated that in order to fire on an opponent, the plane had to fly away from the enemy, thus making it very difficult to be effective. The British experimented with a type of plane in which the gun was mounted in the front and the motors faced the rear. This type gave the advantage of frontal firing, but was so slow on climbing and flight that it was abandoned within a short time.
The first real fighting aircraft to make its appearance was the German Fokker monoplane. Fast, maneuverable, and of the tractor type, the plane had a machine gun mounted in such a fashion as to synchronize with the revolutions of the propeller, thus allowing it to be fired straight ahead. The pilot aimed the gun by aiming the airplane. This plane was so obviously superior to those of the Allies that command of the air had passed to the Germans throughout the rest of the year. In 1916, however, the British were able to challenge the Germans by producing their own type of front firing plane, although it was not until near the end of 1916 that the Allies were able to produce machine gun mounted planes of the Fokker type.
The success of the Fokker airplane was responsible for the advent of formation flying. Casualties among the French and British had grown so heavy that individual flights were discontinued and flights of three or more planes took their place. The Germans retaliated and by the end of the war patrols were the accepted form of air tactics.
It early became apparent to air-minded officers that great damage could be inflicted upon the enemy by dropping bombs from aircraft on his troops, ammunition dumps, factories and other military installations. Indeed, many of the early fighters attempted some rudimentary bombing flights, using hand grenades. These were usually

Wright airplane – First plane in Philippine Islands at Fort McKinley, 1912 – Lieutenant Frank P. Lahm, pilot.
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First plane used by American aviators in France during World War (1918), Morane Roulier, airplane.
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99th Aero Squadron officers in front of planes.
Salinson plane. 91st Squadron.
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Wright machine; with P. Parmalee and Lieutenant M.S. Crissy with first explosive aerial bomb.

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Ineffective except in rare instances. Bombs were then devised which could be dropped from the plane. In early bombing raids the bombs were carried in the cockpit of ordinary fighter planes and heaved over the side by the observer whenever he judged himself to be in a position to hit his target. This was a clumsy, inaccurate system, however, that soon lead to the design of an entirely different craft made for bombing alone, and equipped with machine guns for protection. These planes, which were growing larger and larger as the war progressed, were equipped with bomb racks controlled by mechanisms within the bomber, and carried crews from three to six men. They were utilized at first as lone raiders, depending on stealth and surprise to accomplish their tasks, but by 1917 there had evolved the system of formation attacks by squadrons of bombers escorted by fighter planes as a protective screen. The Germans used this system first to great advantage, and by concentrating very large flights were able not only to concentrate the power of the bombing assault, but have enough fighters to sweep the skies of the opposition.
In addition to the duties of Reconnaissance, the original role of the airplane, had been added the duty of patrol, straffing and bombing, with the Bombardment arm always tending to become more and more important.
After the war the Air Services of all countries began to experiment more and more with the development of bombing planes of increased power and destructive ability. It was realised that it was increasingly possible for planes to inflict very heavy damage on the enemy from the air.
The development of bombsights by all the major powers was to a large degree responsible for this. The American bombsight was recognized as being probably the most accurate of any developed in this period. Accuracy in hitting a predetermined target was coupled with increased altitude which made the planes more safe from enemy fighters and antiaircraft attack. Increased speed and range of the planes has developed down until the present time, when every belligerant possesses bombers capable of flying immense distances with heavy bomb loads.
The United States was among the first to develop the art of dive bombing, wherein the plane is pointed downward at the target and releases its bomb very low, depending upon the tremendous speed of the dive for protection. The dive bomber is very accurate inasmuch as the pilot has the target before him on the way down and does not release his bombs until just above it. It remained for the Germans to develop this to the highest, and it was employed with great success in the battle of France. Many military experts say that the Stuka dive bomber is the greatest single contribution of the war to air combat. The Germans also experimented with and developed the use of air-borne soldiers, utilizing the parachute, originally a safety device, as an instrument for the dropping of offensive men behind the enemy lines. The Russians also have used this extensively, and paratroops are now a part of every belligerant Army. Troop transports capable of carrying many men, supplies and equipment have also been developed, and in the battle of Crete the Germans used air-borne troops to carry the brunt of the battle.
The Japanese and the British have both added chapters to the development of air combat by the use of the torpedo-carrying planes as an effective weapon with which to attack enemy warcraft which are not heavily protected by fighter planes. The English at Taranto and the Japanese at Pearl Harbor and off Malaya demonstrated that unprotected warships can be sunk with relative ease by planes of this type unless they are in turn protected by fighter planes based either on land or on accompanying aircraft carriers.
The day of the spectacular individual air “ace” has apparently closed, as pilots are taught more and more to fly and to fight in absolute formation. Formations are increasing in size as the strength of the warring nations in the air continues to grow.
There has been a growing belief on the part of military men that the day of air power in combat is only begun, and that this war will produce innovations and changes equally as great as those produced in the World War. It is certain that each day, all over America, more and more fighters, bombardiers, navigators, observers, gunners, mechanics and technicians are being trained for whatever role shall be assigned them in America’s growing air armada.

CHIEF OF THE AIR CORPS (Now Army Air Forces)
During the World War, Army Aviation was divided into the Bureau of Military Aeronautics, directed by Major General William L. Kenly, and the Bureau of Aircraft Production, directed by Mr. John D. Ryan, the copper magnate. With the advent of peace, these bureaus were consolidated under one title – Air Service – under the command of Major General Charles T. Menoher, who had commanded the 42nd (Rainbow) Division overseas.
On October 4, 1921, General Menoher was succeeded by Major General Mason M. Patrick. He remained in command until his retirement on December 13, 1927, and was succeeded by Major General James E. Fechet, who served until his retirement in 1931.
Major General Benjamin D. Foulois served for four years, until December, 1935, when he was succeeded by Major General Oscar Westover, who served until his death in a flying accident in 1938. At that time Major General (now Lieutenant General) H.H. Arnold took over and to him has fallen the immense task of directing the Air Force through the present period of war.

96th Aero Squadron officers (Lieutenant Samuel Lunt, fourth from right).
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ARMY AIR FORCES ACCOMPLISHMENTS
From the end of the World War to the present time, the Air Forces have pioneered in numerous aviation activities. A few of these flights and activities, chronologically arranged, are as follows:
1920-February 27. Major Rudolph W. Schroeder established a world’s altitude record of 33,000 feet.
1921-February 12. The Army Air Service successfully completed a Washington, D.C., to Dayton, Ohio, flight.
1921-September 1. The Army Air Service successfully completed a total of 396 forestry patrol flights in the Northwest.
1922- October 6. Lieutenants Oakley G. Kelly and John A. Macready established a world’s endurance record of 35 hours, 18 1-4 minutes.
1922-October 18. Brigadier General William Mitchell established a world’s record for speed over a measured 3-kilometer course of 224.38 m.p.h.
1922- November 4. Lieutenants Kelly and Macready established a world’s record for distance with a flight of 2,060 miles, from San Diego, California, to Fort Benjamin, Indiana.
1923-April 3. Six Army land planes completed a flight to Porto Rico and return.
1923-April 19. Marooned inhabitants of South Fox Island, off the coast of Michigan, were afforded relief through the dropping from Army planes of food and clothing.
1924-March 17. Four Army Douglas World Cruisers departed on an aerial journey around the world. Two of the planes successfully completed the flight of 27,550 miles in 175 days.
1925- November 20. Lieutenant George W. Goddard, Air Corps, made the first successful night aerial photograph.
1926-April 19. The first maneuvers involving the entire Air Service were held at Fairfield, Ohio, in which a total of 45 officers and 67 enlisted men participated, utilizing 44 airplanes.
1927-May 2. The “Good Will” flight returned from South America, after covering a distance exceeding 20,000 miles since December 21, 1926.
1927-May 4. Captain Hawthorne C. Gray, Air Corps, in a free balloon, reached 42,470 feet, the highest altitude ever attained by man up to that time.
1927-June 29. Lieutenants Lester J. Maitland and Albert F. Hegenberger, Air Corps, landed at Honolulu, Hawaii, after having spanned 2,400 miles over the Pacific Ocean from Oakland, California.
1928-June 30. Captain William E. Kepner and Lieutenant William O. Eareckson, aide, representing the Air Corps in the International Free Balloon Race, won first honors, giving the United States permanent possession of the Gordon Bennett Trophy, since it marked the third consecutive time American aeronauts won this trophy.
1929-August 31. Captain Albert W. Stevens, Air Corps, photographed Mt. Rainier from an airplane which was at a distance of 227 miles from this mountain, exceeding by 50 miles any previous record in long-distance aerial photography.
1929-September 24. Lieutenant James H. Doolittle, Air Corps, in a public demonstration of “instrument flying,” accomplished a take-off and a landing solely through the use of instruments, for which he received the International League of Aviators Trophy.
1930-June 20-21. Randolph, San Antonio, Texas, Headquarters of the Air Corps Training Center, was dedicated.
1931-May 18-30, The annual Air Corps Field Exercises began at Dayton, Ohio, and ended at Washington, D.C. The Atlantic seaboard from Maine to Virginia was covered. The First Air Division participated comprising 692 officers, 69 flying cadets and 643 enlisted men. A total of 667 airplanes of all types was utilized in these exercises.
1932- May 9. Captain Albert F. Hegenberger accomplished the first solo flight entirely by instruments.
1933- Master Sergeant Ralph W. Bottriell, of Kelly Field, Texas, was presented the Distinguished Flying Cross for having made the first jump from an Army airplane with the free type parachute, in May, 1919. It was as a result of Sergeant Bottriell’s pioneering that the Air Corps developed the present type parachute.
1934-December 27. The Secretary of War approved the GHQ Air Force organization, and Lieutenant Colonel Frank M. Andrews, designated as its first Commander, was appointed a Major General.
1935-March 1. The GHQ Air Force was officially organized.
1935-August 29. Air Corps engineers made the first flight using the radio compass to control the automatic pilot and thus providing automatic radio navigation.
1935-November 11. Captains Albert W. Stevens and Orvil A. Anderson, Air Corps, reached 72,395 feet in the stratosphere balloon.
1935-December 27. Army bombers scored direct hits on the lava flow from the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii which was menacing the city of Hilo. The bombing tended to divert the lava flow to other channels.
1936-March. The Second Bombardment Group of Langley Field, Virginia, dropped 8,000 pounds of food and medical supplies to communities in Pennsylvania isolated by flood waters. A total of 45 officers and 100 enlisted men participated in these relief missions, utilizing 30 airplanes.
1936-February 10. Major Barney M. Giles, Air Corps; Second Lieutenant J.H. Patrick, Air Reserve; Staff Sergeant D.E. Hamilton and Corporal Frank B. Connor, Air Corps, took off from Concord, New Hampshire, about midnight and located seven CCC youths marooned on drifting ice in Cape Cod Bay. Major Giles circled over the party to show their position to Coast Guard personnel and other planes, which dropped food and blankets. Each of the four airmen received the Distinguished Flying Cross.
1936-June 29. Major General Frank M. Andrews made a non-stop distance record for amphibian planes by piloting the Douglas OA-5 1,425 miles from Porto Rico to Langley Field, Virginia, in 11 hours and 9 minutes.
1937-August 5. The Air Corps substratosphere plane, the Lockheed XC-35, made its initial performance flights at Wright Field, Ohio. Being equipped with a supercharged cabin, oxygen equipment was unnecessary.
1937-August 23. Captains Carl J. Crane and George V. Holloman, Air Corps, and Mr. Raymond K. Stout, Project Engineer, all of Wright Field, made two entirely automatic landings under adverse weather conditions.
1938-April 20. Four officers and five enlisted men began instruction at Patterson Field, Fairfield, made two entirely automatic landings under adverse weather conditions.
1938- February 15-27. Six B-17 bombers flew from Langley field, Virginia, to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and return. The trip south involved landings at Miami, Florida, Lima, Peru, and Buenos Aires. Returning landings were made at Santiago, Chile, Lima and Albrook Field, Panama Canal Zone.
1938-April 14. During a period of four days, all food, grain and supplies necessary for a Cavalry detachment of 30 men and 30 horses were dropped from an airplane in the mountains of the Big Bend District in Texas.
1939-February 4-6. Major C.V. Haynes, Air Corps, with a crew of 10 officers and men, flew the XB-15 bombardment plane from Langley Field, Virginia, to Santiago, Chile, with a load of vaccines and other medical supplies, totalling over 3,000 pounds, needed for earthquake sufferers. The distance of about 5,000 miles between Langley Field and Santiago was accomplished in 49 hours, 18 minutes elapsed time, and in a flying time of 29 hours and 53 minutes.

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[Photograph]
CLASSIFICATION
PRE-FLIGHT
Fully equipped and proud of his new uniform an aviation cadet leaves the receiving building, a new man.

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Beginning CADET TRAINING

The first half hour is the easiest when a young American reports for training in the Army Air Forces. Having been examined, passed and signed up in his home town, he is then sent to the cadet Classification Center for actual induction – the first step on the tough but exciting road to his Army Air Forces Wings. What happens to him immediately on arrival is shown on this page. Having gone through the “first half hour” shown here, the cadet will soon be classified by aptitude tests for bombardier, navigator, or pilot training, and

[Photograph]
WHAT NEXT? is the cheerful attitude of a typical aviation cadet as he plunges into a new life at one of the Classification Centers. In less than half an hour he will be fully transformed from a civilian to a completely outfitted cadet.
[Photograph]
Above: THE COMPLETE CHANGE takes place in one large building. In the first room the aviation cadet is assigned to a squadron. On the next counter he will check in his luggage. Signs make questions unnecessary, and arrows on the floor lead cadets through the transition process from start to finish.
[Photograph]
Left: BLOCKING THE WAY ON THE “MAIN LINE” through the building is the shower room where the aviation cadets are required to give themselves a good scrubbing and to put civilian clothes in one of two barrack bags handed them. Second bag is for military clothes to be issued them.

Below: In footprints painted on the floor, the aviation cadet stands while experts size him up as to physical development. Expert alligns his backbone with two strings to see if it is perfectly straight. Physical records are kept on cadets throughout the training period with a view toward correcting minor ailments by specialized exercises.
[Photograph]

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[Photograph]
ON PARADE

sent to a specialized school in one of the training centers. Less than a year later he will emerge as one of the best flying officers in the world, ready to join Uncle Sam’s mighty air armada in actual combat.

[Photograph]
Above: Gone for the duration are civilian clothes. This aviation cadet tries on one of two pair of neat Army oxfords issued him. Civies are laid away in duffel bag.

Below, Top Picture: High-flying Army Air Forces fight low-crawling athlete’s foot effectively simply by preventing it. Each cade wears paper sandals from the shower until the time he puts on his shoes.
Bottom Picture: Snappy coat and cap are issued cadets at the end of the long clothing line. To transform this outfit to that of an officer if he is commissioned Second Lieutenant at the end of the course, cadet has only to put on Regular Air Forces insignia and remove blue band from his cap.
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[Photograph]
Tug o’war on the athletic area.
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On the pistol range.
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Over the hurdle on the obstacle course.
PRE-FLIGHT TRAINING
After completing the tests in the Classification Center, the new air corps man is assigned to a pre-flight training school for a training course prior to being sent to a Primary Flight School.
Future pilots who are to receive their pre-flight training are sent to one of several fields, where they undergo nine weeks of intensive training.
The training program for the pre-flight pilot is in three major divisions, stressing athletics, military and academic work. They are given one hour a day in athletics and one hour is devoted to military training. The military training consists of close order drill which tends to improve military carriage and to teach discipline. Each man is drilled in the elements of military courtesy and receives actual practice in firing the 45 caliber pistol.
The academic program includes extensive studies in mathematics, physics, military law, citizenship, national policy, organization of the United States Government, the Air Corps, the Army, current events, types of Air Force equipment and armament, command and administration in small units, the firing of the 45 caliber pistol, and defense against chemical attack.
Each four and one half weeks, a new group is sent in from the Classification Center to the Pre-Flight Pilot School and each class moves up. The upper class members have their first actual practice in some of their training as they take charge of the new pilot students and get the new group settled. As the new group begins their nine weeks’ course, the upper class moves into the final phase of their training before graduating to the Primary School.
The Pre-Flight Navigator is sent from the Classification Center to one of several Navigator Pre-Flight Training Schools, where he undergoes nine weeks of training which is basically the same as the pre-flight pilot. There the work is divided into the same three categories with their academic work placing more stress on mathematics. Their other studies include Morse code, air forces, flags of all nations, ground forces, physics, naval forces, meteorology, photography, maps and charts, communication, procedure, cryptography, and target identification.
They are also taught military discipline and the proper ways of safeguarding military information. They spend five hours each day in these classes with new clases [sic] coming in every three weeks. Their military training consists of 45 minutes each day spent in close order drill and inspections each Saturday. During the nine weeks course the men are also given some training in chemical warfare and the use of gas masks and how to recognise the various types of gases.
The ultimate aim of the Navigator School is to give officer training and to give work valuable to them as aircraft observers and to give work

Cadets line up with their ladies.
Cadets arrive from classification center.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
At the piano in the cadet recreation building.
A typical room scene in cadet barracks.
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Grand march under sabre arch at Cadet Ball.
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Rifle inspection.
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[Photograph]
The Colors.

which is prerequisite to the advanced schools. The Navigation School works in conjunction with the advanced schools and at the end of each nine weeks a new class is ready to begin the advanced work.
The Pre-Flight bombardier is sent from the Classification Center to one of the many bombardier schools where he also is subjected to the nine weeks of basic pre-flight training. His academic training lays particular stress upon work in bombardment aviation and particular training in observation from the plane. Other courses are practically the same as those required for a pre-flight navigator.
Throughout the first each “half hour” at the Classification Center and the nine weeks of pre-flight training, the would-be pilot, navigator and bombardier, all have one thought uppermost … to do their best and to get one step further along the road that leads to … WINGS.

PREFLIGHT

Preparing for Saturday inspection.
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Awarding trophies.
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PHYSICAL TRAINING WITH WANDS
Cadets entering the huge mess hall for dinner.
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The shrouds on the parachute must be right.
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Classroom instruction.

The PRIMARIES
Seasoned and well-drilled, with a fair idea of what military life is about, pilot trainees arrive at one of the Army Air Forces Training Center’s elementary flying schools.
These schools are civil airports under contract to the Air Forces. They have lost their indolent look of Sunday afternoon. The leisure is gone out of them. No groups of civilian pilots
[Photograph]
Primary trainers.
[Photograph]
Do it this way.

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loll around in leather jackets. No variety of civilian ships hang around in the afternoon sunlight. The ships are now all blue and yellow trainers – or PT’S. They go up one after another in steady drone. Their motors make a business-like, determined cadence in the air. The atmosphere is calmly serious, for here at elementary school is where the cadet must prove whether or not he has the “stuff” to become a military pilot.
His instructor is a civilian. Before the elementary period is up, this instructor must be able to say to his student:
“You have the inherent ability to fly. You have proved it by soloing within from eight to 12 hours. You have taken your ship up and brought it down countless after countless times. You have done infinitely more than this. You have gone up alone and done acrobatics. You have fought back your uneasiness and done loops and snap rolls. You have put your ship in a bad spin and have brought it out … which, as I say, proves nothing at all except – you are ready to go to Basic School … and luck go with you.”
That is all a cadet can hope to get from elementary school, a solid foundation in flying and a boost into a more difficult curriculum. A considerable number of all who enter elementary school never realize this hope, since they “wash out” for lack of “inherent flying ability.”
Thousands, however, do make the grade. From the Primaries every nine weeks pour a new crop of cadets, men assured of only one thing – that they can fly a PT, understand its simple movements, and comprehend its rudimentary instrument board.
They take with them to Air Corps Basic School this experience – and hope.
LEARNING TO FLY PT’S
Flying blithely through the air may be the dream of many a future pilot when he arrives at a primary training school, but the actual art of successful piloting is no fantasy. The cadet finds that it’s a combination of hard work, intense concentration, a fear of the “washing machine” and an intangible something that he either has or he hasn’t.
[Photograph]
Last-minute instruction.
[Photograph]
Top: Along the obstacle course
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A parachute is better than a rabbit’s foot.
[Photograph]
Right: Mass athletic drill.

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This is what makes it fly.
[Photograph]
Ready for the first ride.

He arrives at a primary school and after being quartered and fed, reports early one morning at the flight line for his first ride. With four or five other cadets comprising his group, he is assigned to an instructor. First he has to learn how to don a parachute, which is an art in itself. He then climbs into the rear cockpit and sits down to look it over. A “stick”, two rudder bars, a throttle, an altimeter and tachometer are the chief instruments he must learn to use in governing the flight of his ship.
First he hooks on his gosports, which are rubber tubes through which his instructor can talk; and much to the consternation of many a “dodo”, he learns there is no way to talk back. Ready to go, he “shoves the coal” to his “crate” and taxis in S curves, for better visibility, out to the runway.
All clear, the cadet, with a slight sinking sensation, inches the throttle forward as the ship gathers speed, gradually applies forward pressure to the stick. Then, just at the right time, he hauls back on the control and pulls the nose up into a long, shallow climb.
“Not so steep … take it easy … Do you want to stall this crate?” the instructor barks in his ears.
A fleeting glance downward causes the cadet to gulp a couple of times to keep his heart down. The ground drops swiftly away. He circles the field to gain altitude, all the time being careful to conform to the local traffic pattern.
At last he reaches the altitude for straight and level flight.
“Left wing too low – Pull ‘er nose up – Watch that tachometer, she’s revving too high – Ease back on the throttle – Hold a little right rudder,” the instructor cautions.
Correction after correction burns up the gosports as the instructor’s monologue becomes a steady drumming in the ears of the chagrined cadet.
As days go by, the cadet learns the “feel” of the plane, becomes dexterous at the more simple maneuvers of flight and recognizes the various plane altitudes and their relations to maintaining his course. He is now ready for that glorious experience when, for the first time, with hight spirits and sinking heart, he takes off, flies and lands, without the comforting companionship of his instructor. He solos.
After the “solo” he becomes familiar with various acrobatic maneuvers. Slow-rolls, snap-rolls, loops, spins, chandelles and lazy eights are part of the concentrated training program.
Then suddenly after weeks of primary training, he gazes upon a new world. A world he dared not even dream of heretofore – the world of Basic Flying School.
He is no longer a “dodo”. He rapidly is developing into an Army Air Forces pilot. If he ever had a sinking sensation upon looking at an airplane he probably has lost it by now, and when anyone asks him if he can fly, he can answer “yes, sir” in a low, reserved tone – but with one eye cocked toward days to come.

[Drawing]

Leaving the hangar.
[Photograph]

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[Photomontage]
BASIC TRAINING
Off we go into the wild blue yonder, climbing high into the sun:
Those first line of “The Air Corps Song” provide the setting for this photomontage of men and planes. Dominated by that sleek, stub-nosed master of the skies, the advanced trainer at the left, the picture shows (bottom to top) the Corps of Cadets on the march, with the Stars and Stripes of America flying beside the British Union Jack, and the U.S. cadet and the R.A.F. standards billowing next to them. Directly overhead is a scene on the flying line, and above that are the “Three Musketeers” of the air – the combat team of pilot, bombardier and navigator. Surmounting all is an echelon of warbirds, ready to loose their thunder on any enemy who dares to confront them.

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READY TO FLY
[Photograph]

Life IN BASIC TRAINING

Stepping on to the whirligig of basic school, the cadet’s first warm glow of enthusiasm soon changes to puzzled bewilderment. The very speed with which he is carried both in his new ship in the air and in the classroom on the ground reminds him of an old phrase he heard quite often in the first week of training: “Wipe that smile off your face, Mister.”
In addition to more difficult flying technique, he steps into even harder military routine, and to the casual observer his thrust-out chest is likely to appear as the only visible part of his anatomy. His memory, constantly being polished up on matters of military discipline, begins to shine like the wings he strives for.
The weight of the world is on his shoulders when after four or five hours instruction comes the day when he must take his heavier and faster ship up for “solo”. It is only after this accomplishment that he begins to warm up once more to the possibility that he may still have the makings of the world’s hottest pilot. By the day of his second solo he is getting downright eager.
But always present, outstriding by just one step his rising enthusiasm, are the upperclassmen to keep his “eagerness” at half throttle. Once he is allowed to sit on the “little red stool” or to count himself a member of the “Eager Squadron,” he may be convinced that no one is perfect – not even himself – that all is not perfect, and that maybe his even a “gross” cadet.

WARM HAND OF WELCOME FOR UNCLE SAM’S ENEMIES. Etched again sky, traditional Army .45’s are aimed by Army Air Cadets. The revolvers may be no match for dive bombers but they are mighty handy in hand-to-hand fighting on the ground.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

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Instructor’s favorite method of demonstrating plane altitudes is with his hands. Below: An instructor explains a formation maneuver while cadets “follow through.”
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

At basic he makes his first sundown trek to the flight line, and, after many anxious moments, and by the light of the moon (if he is lucky) he shoves his plane up toward the constellations and realizes he
is making his first night flight.
After that comes instrument training, and more night flights, and cross-country flying and more night flights, the use of the radio, and still more night flights.
By this time also, he has learned that there is such a thing as “flaps,” and has learned how to use them. With his hair standing on end he perceives there are times to use flaps and times not to use flaps.
Finally, comes that day when he happily watches the upperclassmen move on to Advanced Training. A self-satisfied smile spreads across his face, for now HE is an upperclassman.
Immediately, he turns to the new arrival from Primary and barks, “Brace there, Mister … Where did you get so gross? What country club did you come from?”
There is little time to “lord it.” His time now is taken up sunk in navigation problems to prepare him for cross-country flights. He is quite busy getting a firm hand on his tricky BT.
Basic seems to become very “gross” toward the end. The cadet becomes conscious of a new world, the last to be thoroughly toured before he gets his commission to the world known as Advanced Flying School.

Cadet mess.
[Photograph]
Basic trainers on the line.
[Photograph]

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[Photograph]
NIGHT FLIGHT

ADVANCED TRAINING
“Where the pig iron is taken and molded into the finished product.” The third and last phase in an aviation cadet’s training is at Advanced, and it is here that the polish is applied and the kinks taken out before sending him out as an officer. For the first time, the cadet is considered a pilot – and the instructor, his flight commander. He learns to carry the responsibility which will soon be his – to know that in his hands are the lives of others as well as his own.
Having completed Primary and Basic training, the boys decide they’re pilots and that this Advanced “stuff” isn’t going to get them. No Sir! After handling those basic trainers, the AT’s are going to be easy. All goes well – the cadets report in. No hazing from the upperclass – in fact, no trouble at all as long as they remain “eager.”
The first ten hours of flying at Advanced is devoted to transition. During this time the cadet learns to handle the faster and heavier ship with its additional equipment, such as retractable landing gear, hydraulic flaps, and constant speed prop. These are the days of worry, for what cadet wants five stars? However, the time goes quickly, and the cadets say “Goodbye” to the time when they could take up a plane by themselves and fly as they desired, for formation flying walks in the door and remains. Instrument flying is an important part of the training, part of it on the ground in the “Jeep”

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Left. Top: THE OLD PUSH-UP is a standard “man killer” in the Training Centers, but cadets, becoming tougher and tougher, refused to be tired, come back for more.
Bottom: Final Exams.

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the ADVANCED
[Photograph]
Ready for Oxygen Hop.

(Link Trainer) which handles just like the real airplane. In these are taught the procedures which are later practiced in the air on team rides under the hood. Altitude flights are made to accustom cadets to the use of oxygen and the reactions of the plane in the lighter atmosphere. One of the most thrilling of all the cadet missions is the first night cross-country trip. Having flown “night local” at Basic, night flying itself is not so unusual, but to follow the light lines to another city means a new step in training. Flying takes but half of the day – the remainder is spent in the classroom, at athletics, or drilling.
Then for ten days, the class has a break in their advanced training – ten days of gunnery practice at another school. Here cadets practice at ground and aerial gunnery. With machine guns mounted on the trainers, each man shoots several hundred rounds every day.
Yes, at any advanced flying school is taught the necessary subjects which any Army Air Forces pilot must know, to prepare him for service in the field as an officer.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Above, Top: AT Advance Twin Engine Trainer. Bottom: A.T-6’s on the line.

Close up.
Trainer with control unit.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

Bank her this way.
Testing their oxygen masks.
[Photograph]
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Watching the flight.
Ground crew off duty, but still “talking shop.”
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Top Row, Left: Gentlemen with swords once settled their quarrels at dawn. But these gentlemen, aviation cadets in the Training Center, work out with foils in order to develop cat-like quickness and dexterity which will be valuable to them in settling scores in air combat. Center: After a long flight.
Right: Cross country preparation.

Middle Row, Left: Back to the barracks after a hard day’s work in the air. Center: British cadets fold Old Glory at Retreat. Right: Advanced navigation trainer.

Bottom Row, Left: A sextet of aviation cadets in the air as they are determinedly making a broadjump on the obstacle course used in the physical training program. When the full story of this war is written, there will be a special chapter devoted to the hours of scientific study, the subsequent hours of manpower, prespiration [sic] and drudgery now being expended to toughen our combat fliers for the fight. Men were not made to fly at rarefied altitudes of 30,000 feet, nor were they built to be wrenched in the air at speeds of 500 miles an hour. But our enemies are doing it. We must. And the rugged physical conditioning program in the Southeast Training Center is the successful answer to how we can. The keystone in the training program is the development of those muscles and nerves most used in combat flying. Center: Sky Bound. Right: Advanced Trainers.

[Photograph]
Left: Like a man from Mars with a “death ray generator” in his hands, this Army Air Force photographer draws a bead as squadrons of planes roar across the cloud banks of the Southland. Anywhere he may point his finder he will catch the growing flights of aviation cadets doing precision formation flying.

[Drawing]

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[Photograph]
BOMBARDIER TRAINING

The whole striking power of the Air Forces, insofar as destructive power is concerned, is carried at the tips of the Bombardier’s fingers. Isolated and alone in the glassed-in “greenhouse” right in the very nose of the power bomber, it is his duty to direct his plane to the proper point above his target and release his bombs with such split-second timing as to insure their finding their mark.
For much of the plane’s flight the bombardier is merely a passenger, but as the plane nears its objective it is in his hands, and his alone, that the success of the mission rests.
Aided by the finest instruments for precision bombing owned by any nation in the world, the bombardier must make allowances for such things as plane speed, height, air temperature, weight of the bombs, wind and cross drifts and other factors.
He sets these facts into his bombsight, which is in essence a calculating machine, and at the right moment releases his bombs.
Before he reaches that target, however, the bombardier spends twelve crowded weeks learning the fundamentals and the fine points of his destructive trade. The bombardier is selected for his task at the Classification Section of the Air Forces. He is selected because

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BOMBARDIERS

he has shown marked ability at manual dexterity so that he can twist knobs without fumbling, muscle control so that his adjustments are always precise, serial reaction so that he can apply data in orderly sequence, and a calm temperament so he won’t get rattled easily.
Once he has been selected for his rigorous task the embryo bombardier is sent to one of the large bombardier schools, where he is first introduced into the theory of bombing. He attends classes and discovers the intricasies of what makes bombs fall as they do. He learns the composition of bombs, their various reactions to different conditions and situations. Above all, he spends many hours practicing on the bomb trainer, a platform some 12 feet above the ground which stimulates actual bombing conditions.
Over and over again he works out the various problems that are connected with his intricate art, learning to turn dials, straining his eyes, learning to coordinate mind and body so that his movements will be swift, sure and above all, accurate. As time goes on he finds that he is acquiring the sure timing and accurate adjustment necessary to make of him a finished bombardier.
He learns in classrooms about such things as probable error, the reason behind pattern bombing, learns how to calculate wind drift and other such problems.
As he grows more proficient he works out advanced problems involving all these factors on his training platform, so that by the time he is ready to take to the air for his practice trips he has a clear idea of just what problems he will face and what his responsibility is.
When the time comes for him to make his practice bombings he is carried in a modern fast bomber. He bombs at day and he bombs at night. He lives and thinks bombing. The practice bombs are loaded with black powder instead of high explosive and when these detonate the bombardier can see just how far he missed his target. He gets practice bombing from all angles and under all kinds of conditions. He learns to bomb from his altitude when his bombs are released three miles before he reaches his objective, and he learns to bomb from low altitudes when his bombs crash right on top of his objective.
He is schooled in the use of the Norden and Sperry bombsights, our most vital military secret.
At the end of nine weeks he makes his “record runs,” the final examination for a bombardier which determines whether he is a first, second or third class bombardier. If he graduates as a first class bombardier his position will probably be in the nose of the leading plane in his flight so that he can help the following bombardiers in the proper releasing of their bombs.
During his last three weeks of training the bombardier is in the air almost constantly, bombing on the practice range under all types of combat conditions. He learns how to release his bombs at very low altitudes when he can’t use his sight, but must rely on his own sight and judgment; he also learns to bomb from so high that he has to use oxygen to enable him to breathe. He learns how to check his

[Photograph]
Shown through the two racks of bombs is a bombardier cadet waving an all-clear to the ground crew as he goes up to the “nose.”

[Photograph]
Bombardier training.

Instructor at the blackboard explaining diagram illustrating the fall of the bomb as aviation cadets look on.
[Photograph]

Where to this trip? The cadets check the mission schedule to get their destination and “target” for the flight.
[Photograph]

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IN THE MAKING … [Drawing]
[Photograph]
This Douglas B-18 bombardier training ship with its bomb racks loaded with practice bombs and manned by aviation cadets en route to target range.

data and release his bombs within 20 seconds of sighting his objective. He learns how to loose his bombs either in a string, which is one at a time, or in a salvo, which is all together.
At the end of his 12 weeks he is graduated and gains his coveted wings. From that time on he is a finished bombardier. He may be used to train other bombardiers or he may be assigned to a combat squadron anywhere on the face of the earth where the far-flung armies of the nation are in combat.
Like the pilot and the navigator, the bombardier is a highly specialized man. He is trained to function as an integral part of the bomber crew, and he knows that he was picked for his task, just as the pilot and the navigator, because of special skills which have been further developed by the course of training which he has undergone.

From bombardier cadets, eager to go “upstairs” for one of their regular training flights at an advanced flying school, check out their flying “tack” at Supply Headquarters.
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
Planning the “Pay Load.” Tools of the cadet bombardier’s important trade are these 100-pound training bombs, ready to be loaded into the giant belly hatch of a B-18 bomber.

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NAVIGATION
[Photograph]
Hundreds of two-engined training ships like this whisk students aloft on 1,000-mile missions. Ships carry a crew of five, the pilot, navigation instructor, and three students.

They call him the Little Tin Guy.
His nerves seem all metal, his mind works like a compass, and his job is to get our bombers there and get ‘em back, over land, over water, through weather and rain and hail and fog – through anything!
He is better known as the navigator and he is being trained at specialized schools.
The Little Tin Guy is being hammered out by the hundreds, and he will be hammered out by the thousands. He was present to smash the Jap fleet at Midway, and he carried the fire to Tokyo with General Doolittle. If he had not been along with his octant, his dividers and compasses, his maps and charts and unpronounceable gadgets, there would have been no victory at Midway, no fires at Tokyo.

[Photograph]
HITS OR MISSES? Whether our bombers, hurtling across thousands of miles of ocean waste like this, smash targets or miss objectives completely, depends largely on the navigator, dubbed “The Little Tin Guy.” Above, a training ship from one of the Navigation Schools flies a plotted course over the Atlantic. Below, left, a student navigator keeps on course by shooting the sun through the blister in the ship’s top. After graduation, young navigators with motto, “Get ‘em there – Get ‘em back!” can take bombers anywhere – Tokyo not excluded.

[Photograph]
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Below, right, in the back seat, another navigation cadet navigates the same course by pilotage, or by checking points on his map with corresponding points on the ground. The river he sees coiled below is a well-known landmark.

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[Photograph]
WITH MAPS NEATLY ROLLED and instruments in their cases, young navigator march to the flying line and board ships assigned to them.

Without the navigator, bombers would be freight loads of destruction rushing at terrific speed through tractless space, but rushing without purpose, without hesitation.
The navigator CAN get ‘em there. He CAN get ‘em back. This is why: He doesn’t just happen to be a good navigator. He is made a good navigator.
Appointed an aviation cadet, he goes to a classification center. By mental examinations and weighted psychological tests it is determined whether he is by nature best qualified to be a navigator, bombardier, or pilot.
To be classified as navigator he must be a steady-nerved, cool-headed individual capable of making lightning decisions. He must have plenty of grey matter between the ears for he must master the equivalent of a full college course in a short time. He cannot be merely the bookworm-type intellectual. He must have the brawn and the wind to move around in a plane at high altitudes, forsaking his oxygen. He must be able to work complicated problems at dizzy heights where the average man cannot add three and six.
Classified “navigator,” he is put through weeks of elementary training and then sent to a navigation school for the real thing.

[Photograph]
Cadets sit one behind the other at desks in the belly of the ship. Here students have several minutes to figure their course while the pilot circles the field.

With E68 computer, called “The Navigator’s Wife,” because, cadets say, “It does everything in an airplane but cook,” a cadet estimates time of arrival to the next familiar landmark … Meanwhile another cadet, who must figure entirely by instruments, looks through driftmeter to see if wind is knocking the ship off course … To be triple sure of the airplane’s location, the pilot puts the ship on “automatic pilot” and lets it fly itself while he studies his map. If student gets off course, he will not correct him, but will keep his own bearings and tell student his mistake later … OXYGEN MASKS are worn by all crew members above altitudes of 10,000 feet. The Navigator must be in top physical condition, for in combat missions he must forsake oxygen and move around the ship to use his octant. In actual combat he mans a machine gun.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

[page break]

“LITTLE TIN GUYS” ..
[Photograph]
BEFORE A FLIGHT cadet navigators at one of the fields training navigators crowd the ready room with maps and charts which will guide each man on a different mission.

This school hands him an intensive, practical course. He gets a course in the Navi-trainer, a machine which simulates all conditions of air navigation. He goes to ground class for eight hours a day, and for three hours at night. He is awakened in the dead of night and routed out to study the stars. He learns the theory of celestial, radio, pilotage and dead reckoning navigation.
Then his classroom goes to the sky. He flies in the two-motored AT-7. The ship carried three students, one instructor, and a pilot. The students sit at three desks one behind the other in the belly of the ship.
Usually the student in the front sea works his problem by instruments. He is not allowed to look at the ground. (The ground may not be visible to help on combat missions). The other two students do pilotage or follow the course on the map by recognizing corresponding objects on the terrain.
The new navigator spends 100 hours in the air. The courses he charts take him over several states. He directs the ship through day and through night on four-hour missions, on eight-hour missions. He mustn’t go to sleep. He mustn’t blink an eye.
“Zero Zero” is the navigator’s ultimate objective. Zero Zero in navigation means perfection. It means navigating through hundreds or thousands of miles of space, cloud rack, wind and weather and hitting a dime-size objective “on the nose” at the precise second you predicted you would hit it on the nose. One inch off is not Zero Zero. One second early or late is not Zero Zero. Zero Zero means right on the button, right on time!
It is not easy. New navigators say, “If you got there Zero Zero the driftmeter plays “The Star Spangled Banner” and hands you a cigar!”
But at the end of the course they do get there Zero Zero, and they get their Wings.
Then to units for further tactical training where they work for a while as members of a fighting team before they go to combat or to a ferry command.
The navigator’s first assignment may be to navigate a quarter-million-dollar Flying Fortress and its seven-man crew from Florida to a pin-dot airbase, surrounded by enemy-held territory-overseas. The ship is his personal responsibility. If he misses, too bad. But he doesn’t miss.
The best and most independent old pilots warm up to their navigators in direct proportion to the distance they have to fly. Flying in this war is almost all long-distance flying. The emphasis is on the navigator. The emphasis is on the Little Tin Guy!

[Drawing]

[page break]

[Photograph]
[inserted] Control Tower AT MAXWELL [/inserted]
SOUTHEAST ARMY AIR FORCES TRAINING CENTER
MAXWELL FIELD, ALABAMA

[37]

[page break]

HEADQUARTERES
SOUTHEAST ARMY AIR FORCES TRAINING CENTER
Maxwell Field
Montgomery, Alabama
July 3, 1942
To All Members of this Command:
Since its inception on July 13, 1940, the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center has developed from a mere directive on paper and a total of five officers, to its present strength of thousands of officers, cadets, and enlisted men stationed throughout sixteen states. It has been a tremendous job, and only the loyalty and unsparing efforts of the entire command have made possible this progress.
In the coming days and months the obstacles will be no less and our output must be greater.
To all those who have labored so well in making the Training Center a vital link in the Army Air Forces, I want to express my personal appreciation for a job well done. I have the utmost confidence in your ability to meet the increasing responsibilities of the future.
To the thousands of cadets who have received their training here, and to the thousands still to come, - we dedicate our efforts.
[signature]
W.W. WELSH,
Colonel, Army Air Forces,
Commanding.

[Drawing]

[page break]

[Photograph]
WILLIAM W. WELSH
COLONEL, AIR CORPS
Commanding Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center
Colonel Welsh was born in Denver, Colo., September 16, 1893. Enlisting in the Signal Enlisted Reserve Corps, May, 1917, at Omaha, Neb.; called to active duty December 20, 1917, reporting to the School of Military Aeronautics, Austin, Tex., for ground school training. Assigned to the Cadet Concentration Camp, Fort Dick, Dallas, Tex., later to the flying school at Park Field, Millington, Tenn. Commissioned a Second Lieutenant, aviation section, Signal Corps, May 28, 1918.
Transferred to Payne Field, Miss., serving as instructor until October, 1918, then transferred to the Aviation Concentration Depot for overseas service. The Armistice was signed prior to his departure, however, and he was sent to Carlstrom Field, Arcadia, Fla.
Saw service at March Field, Calif., Brooks Field, San Antonio, Tex., France Field, Panama Canal Zone and Kelly Field, Texas; 1931-36 stationed at Louisville, Ky., as Commanding Officer of Bowman Field and on detached service with the Organized Reserves.
In August, 1936, attended the Air Forces Tactical School, graduating in 1937. Since then he has been on duty continuously at Maxwell Field, serving first with the Tactical School until it was rendered inactive in 1940, and then with the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center.
He holds ratings of command pilot and combat observer.

[page break]

GENERAL STAFF

[Drawing]

[Photograph]
JOHN G. WILLIAMS
Colonel, General Staff Corps
Chief of Staff

[Photograph]
ALBERT M. WOODY
Lieutenant Colonel, Air Corps
Executive Officer

[Photograph]
A.L. PRICHARD
Lieutenant Colonel, General Staff Corps
A-1

[Photograph]
AMZI G. BARBER
Lieutenant Colonel, General Staff Corps
A-2

[Photograph]
JOHN F. McBLAIN
Colonel, General Staff Corps
A-3

[Photograph]
LEDCREICH STUART VANCE
Lieutenant Colonel, General Staff Corps
A-4

[40]

[page break]

[Diagram]
“The Best Training in the World” sounds like a big statement – and it is – but that’s what America’s young men get when they are accepted by the Army Air Forces for training as pilots, bombardiers and navigators. The above chart, prepared by the Southeast AAF Training Center, shows the progressive stages of training Army aviation cadets undergo from the time they pass the physical and mental examinations at a local board or Army Post, until they emerge as Second Lieutenants or with the newly created grade of Flight Officer. (Both ranks carry the same pay, and Flight Officers may later be commissioned as Second Lieutenants). Upon graduation from the last stage of Training Center preparation, the young officers are assigned to a Combat Unit and are ready to meet the enemy. And because of their exceptional training, they will meet him on better than even terms in knowledge and ability. That means greater safety for themselves – and bad news for their opponents!

[41]

[page break]

[Photograph]
School Squadron Building
[Photograph]
Maxwell Field Post Headquarters.

VIEWS ….
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Left to Right:
Commanding Officer’s Quarters.
Non-Commissioned Officers’ Quarters.
Bachelor Officers’ Quarters.
Maxwell Field Officers’ Club Lounge.

[Drawing]

[42]

[page break]

[Photograph]
“PX” CAFETERIA, FOR ENLISTED MEN AND CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES

…. AROUND MAXWELL FIELD
Today, three Army Air Forces Training Centers, each operating as a separate unit, but all constituting one great United States Army Flying Academy, are working day and night to attain the goal of producing the necessary pilots, navigators, bombardiers to blast the Axis forces off the ground and out of the skies. They are the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center, with headquarters at Maxwell Field, Ala.; the Gulf Coast Army Air Forces Training Center, with headquarters at Randolph Field, Texas, and the West Coast Army Air Forces Training Center, with headquarters at Santa Anna, Calif.
The Southeast Training Center is typical of all three, and more than either of the other two, it started from scratch.
On November 16, 1940, the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center launched its aviation cadet program. Major General Walter R. Weaver was put in command of the Center and at that time it consisted of nothing more than its present headquarters at Maxwell Field, Montgomery, Ala.

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
To the Right, Top: Austin Hall, Headquarters of the Southeast Army Air Forces Training Center, Maxwell Field, Alabama. Bottom: Office of the Commanding Officer, Headquarters, Southeast AAF Training Center.

[page break]

Today scores of air schools are operating in the Training Center. Many others are soon to be activated. Webbed as a single unit around their command headquarters at Maxwell Field, they dot the land from the State of Wisconsin to the tip of Florida, extending as far west as North Dakota. In fact, the Southeast Training Center has long since outgrown its name. Here in this part of the United States, lies the greatest air training center in the world today. The sky is literally the limit for the facts and figures of the expanding program and for the number of men fast undergoing the transition from shaky-winged fledglings to dependable Army flyers.
As though this were not job enough, the Center swung open its doors in June, 1941, to British aviation cadets, who after completion of their training returned home for duty with the RAF. The total number of British students graduated from the schools in the Center is a military secret, but the total figure runs into the thousands.
And in May, 1942, a large contingent of sun-tanned Dutchmen from the East Indies arrived in this country for training in the Southeast Training Center.
Call it discipline, organization, mass production, or what you will … The Southeast Training Center is producing a large share of the nation’s pilots, navigators, bombardiers. A new class of aviation cadets enters the training center every five weeks. From all over the country, from many different vocations, climates and ways of life, they come to sign up with the Air Forces. They have three things in common: a minimum amount of luggage, a yen to fly, and a desire to come to grips with the enemy.

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Above. Top to Bottom: Mess Call. Cadet Mess Hall. Post Exchange, Maxwell Field. Post Library.
[Photograph]

[44]

[page break]

COCHRAN FIELD
[Photograph]
CONTROL TOWER
MACON , GEORGIA
1942

[45]

[page break]

HEADQUARTERS
ARMY AIR FORCES BASIC FLYING SCHOOL DDF/w
COCHRAN FIELD, MACON, GA.

To the Men of Cochran Field,
I welcome this opportunity to greet each and every one of you. I have had the privilege of being with you men here and of working with you and for you. You and I have seen fertile land change from the production of farm crops to the production of fine men. Some of these men must leave, but some stay to help us. I am proud of you, your work, and our products. I am glad that you too are proud of our accomplishments.
My sincere best wishes to each and every one of you. Thank you for your loyalty, your hard work, and your high ideals. May the spirit of this command continue to be expressed by the words, “We can and we will.”

[signature]
D.D. FITZ GERALD
Colonel, Air Corps
Commanding.

[page break]

[Photograph]
DONALD D. FITZ GERALD
Colonel
Commanding Cochran Field
Born in Washington, D.C., December 13, 1896. Graduated from Pennsylvania Military College with a degree in Civil Engineering in 1917. Completed Post Graduate course at Yale University in 1926 with a M.S. in Electrical Engineering.
Was commissioned Second Lieutenant, Field Artillery, June 1, 1918, and transferred to the Air Service as an Aerial Observer on August 28, 1918. Commissioned First Lieutenant, Air Service, July 1, 1920; Captain, Air Corps, January 1, 1934; Major (temporary) August 26, 1936; Major (permanent) July 1, 1940; Lieutenant Colonel (temporary) March 15, 1941; Colonel (temporary) January 20, 1942.
During his military career has been stationed at Saumur, France, in 1918, as Field Artilleryman; Tours and Chattil on Sur-Seine, France, in 1918, as a student observer; Treves and Coblenz, Germany, in 1918, with the Army of Occupation. Was at Mitchell Field, Kelly Field, and Fort Bliss in 1919; at Camp Knox, Fort Sill and March Field for pilot training in 1920, attended Signal School at Camp Vail in 1922-23; back to Kelly Field in 1923-25; McCook Field in 1926-28; Brooks Field, 1928-31; Hawaii, 1931-33; Rockwell Field, 1933-35; the Air Corps Tactical School, Maxwell Field, 1935-36; Bolling Field, 1936-39; Randolph Field, 1939-40; Gunter Field, 1940-41; Maxwell Field, January, 1941 – April 1941.
Colonel Fitz Gerald has been Commanding Officer of Cochran Field since its conception in April, 1941. His leadership of Cochran Field has been superb.

[47]

[page break]

STAFF
[Photograph]
RICHARD H. WISE
Lieutenant Colonel
Post Executive Officer

[Photograph]
WILHELM C. FREUDENTHAL
Lieutenant Colonel
Operations Officer

[Photograph]
JAMES W. CLARK
Captain
Adjutant

[Photograph]
OTTO E. KELLER
Captain
Intelligence Officer

SPECIAL STAFF
[Photograph]
JOHN F. GORMAN
Major
Special Services Officer

[Photograph]
RAYMOND V. MARLAN
Major
Quartermaster

[Photograph]
CHARLES E. WILSON
Major
Administrative Inspector

[Photograph]
CHARLES R. CROSS
Major
Provost Marshal

MAXWELL C. HARRINGTON
Captain
Ordnance Officer
[Photograph]

ALLEN D. SMITH
Captain
Surgeon
[Photograph]

MYRON R. BITTIKOFER
Captain
Engineer
[Photograph]

PERCY F. HERRING
Captain
Chaplain
[Photograph]

[48]

[page break]

[Photograph]
PATRICK D. HUFF
Captain
Signal Officer

[Photograph]
FRANK P. GALLO
Captain
Personnel Officer

[Photograph]
MORRIS J. DROBECK
Captain
Athletic and Theatre Officer

[Photograph]
EDWARD J. MACK
Captain
Finance Officer

[Photograph]
HOWARD L. DAVIS
Second Lieutenant
Communications Officer

[Photograph]
R.J. ERFLE
First Lieutenant
Transportation Officer

[Photograph]
WILLIAM E. WALK, JR.
First Lieutenant
Base Weather Officer

[Photograph]
OWEN W. SILVEY
First Lieutenant
Chemical Property Officer

SCHOOL STAFF
C. CONRAD PRATT
Major
Director of Training
[Photograph]

FRANK W. ISEMAN
Major
Commandant of Cadets
[Photograph]

JOHN M. WINGE
Captain
School Secretary
[Photograph]

ARTHUR L. HUFF
Captain
Director of Ground School
[Photograph]

[49]

[page break]

HISTORY OF COCHRAN FIELD

A site containing about a thousand acres was purchased by the City of Macon, Georgia, in December, 1940. This land, located nine miles south of the City on the Hawkinsville Highway, was designated by the Federal Government in February, 1941, as the site for buildings for Flying School Number 1 and construction was started on March 15th.
Thus was Cochran Field begun. At that time the land was typical middle Georgia farm land and was covered by several sizeable peach and pecan orchards, some truck farms, numerous dwellings and a church.
The field which was at first known as Flying School Number 1, from its priority of construction, was later named for Robert J. Cochran, who was born in Camilla, Georgia. He died in action in France during the first World War while serving as a First Lieutenant with the Eighth Aero Squadron.
On April 15, 1941, five officers with seventy-five men arrived at Cochran Field in a truck convoy under the command of Captain R.H. Wise. They came from Gunter Field, Montgomery, Alabama, and reported to Lieutenant Colonel D.D. Fitz Gerald who had arrived from Maxwell Field on April 7th.
Many of the men were key non-commissioned officers. They were the nucleus around which the Basic Training School was formed. These members of the original detachment were assigned to quarters in tents while Lieutenant Colonel Fitz Gerald began his command from a make-shift desk.
On May 15th, the field was designated as a Basic Army Flying School. The first planes arrived from Gunter Field on May 23rd. Paving had already begun on the gigantic runways and was soon completed. These runways are equivalent to scores of miles of ordinary paved roadway.
Training of the first aviation cadets, who arrived on June 3rd, began June 4, 1941, three days ahead of regular schedule, and the first class was graduated August 13th, five days ahead of schedule. On August 18, 1941, the first class of British cadets arrived to begin their duties. Classes of both American and British cadets have been held continuously since that date.
Lieutenant Colonel Fitz Gerald was appointed to the rank of Colonel (temporary) on January 20, 1942, and Cochran Field under his guidance has emerged from a red, muddy orchard to become one of the finest training schools of the Air Forces. The station is continuously turning out officers and men who are fitted to carry on our battle to victory.

[50]

[page break]

COCHRAN FIELD
ACTIVITIES
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
READY FOR ACTION
[Photograph]
CADETS TAKE TO THE AIR
[Photograph]
PLANE PARK

[page break]

[Photograph]
Lieutenant James and Civil Service pilot just before take-off.
[Photograph]
Last minute instructions.

LOOKS LIKE A VICIOUS MONSTER READY TO SPRING
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: The take-off.
Above: P.T. trainer on the line.

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: A line of planes go into position for take-off.
Above: A squadron takes off.

A cadet has taken to the air.
[Photograph]
All set for a take off.
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: Drying parachute. Above: Sewing parachute.

Folding.
[Photograph]
Almost finished.
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
LINE MAINTENANCE MAKES A 100-HOUR CHECK-UP

LINE MAINTENANCE

[Photograph]
Left: The men in the line maintenance section are thoroughly trained in the general construction principles, repair, adjustment, inspection and maintainment of the complete airplane, engine and affiliated equipment. On the shoulders of these men rests the responsibility of keeping the planes running smoothly. Although the modern plane is built to withstand much harsh punishment there is always a day of reckoning and that is where the line maintenance comes into its own.

[page break]

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: Washing and checking a plane, part of the plane park is seen in the background. Above: The line maintenance gasses ‘em up.

[57]

[page break]

[Photograph]
SCRUB-UP TIME
[Photograph]
25-HOUR INSPECTION
[Photograph]
100-HOUR CHECK

[page break]

[Photograph]
COCHRAN FIELD BAND

Below. Top to Bottom: Dental clinic. Microscope work in Medical Detachment laboratory.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

Below. Top to Bottom: Headquarters Building. Post Chapel. Post Hospital.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: Weather tower.
Above: Radio operator at receiving set.

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top: Plotting “winds aloft” map in Weather Department.
Above: Routine in the Weather Department.

The Minds Behind the Men in the Air

Light gun in the control tower.
[Photograph]
Map study in Airways Section.
[Photograph]

[page break]

[Photograph]
Observing balloon by theodite.
[Photograph]
Studying the enlarger in the photographic department.

Below: Giving instructions from inside the control tower.
Bottom: Cadets check in with an M.P.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

Below: Crash truck.
Bottom: An M.P. issues a pass.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

[page break]

ON THE MARCH
BELOW: CADETS FORMATION. BOTTOM: RECRUIT SQUADRON ON THE MARCH.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]


[page break]

[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Swimming and diving is a favorite off duty activity at Cochran Field.

FAMILIAR SCENES

Right: Officers’ Club. Right, Below: A chess game in the Recreation Hall. Below: Mess inspection.
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]

[page break]

VIEWING THE 27TH SQUADRON
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
[Photograph]
Top Picture:
THE 27TH SQUADRON LINES UP
Center Picture:
GAS MASK DRILL
Bottom Picture:
A SERGEANT GIVES ORDERS TO TRUCK DRIVER.

[page break]

Personnel
COCHRAN FIELD
MACON , GEORGIA
1942

[65]

[page break]

[Photograph]
JOHN R. KNIGHT
Major

[Photograph]
JAMES W. LILLARD, JR.
Captain

[Photograph]
ROBERT MARTENS
Captain

[Photograph]
FREDERICK G. McNALLY
Captain

[Photograph]
JOHN MONACO, JR.
Captain

FLYING OFFICERS

[Photograph]
SAMUEL S. RIDDLE, JR.
Major

[Photograph]
FRANK A. SHARP
Captain

[Photograph]
WALTER A. SMITH, JR.
Captain

[Photograph]
DAVID B. TUDOR
Captain

[Photograph]
WENDELL M. VAN SICKLE
Captain

TRUMAN F. ANDERSON
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JAMES A. GIBSON
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

VINCENT A. BLACK
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

EDWIN H. BOYERS
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

COLIN F. BURCH, JR.
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[66]

[page break]

[Photograph]
CHARLES A. CUTHBERT, JR.
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
WILLIAM W. EVANS, JR.
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
BERNARD J. FINAN, JR.
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
ALEX H. GAY
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
RAYMOND L. GEORGE
First Lieutenant

JOHN D. GORHAM, JR.
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

SAMUEL D. HALEY
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

DeALBERT S. HOKE, JR.
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

ROBERT B. HUTCHINSON
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

ROBERT R. JONES
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
WILLIAM P. KOCH
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
KENNETH M. LEGHORN
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
JAMES A. MAGUIRE
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
RICHARD H. MAY
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
ROBERT E. MONROE
First Lieutenant

STANISLAW J. PODOLAK
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

DORSEY A. PULLIAM
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

AMOS L. SLUDER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

HARRY W. SHOUP
Captain
[Photograph]

HARRY J. SHUFFLER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[67]

[page break]

[Photograph]
HAROLD D. STANHOPE
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
L.V. TEETER
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
PETER S. WALKER
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
PHILIP G. WARNER
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
GEORGE O. WHITE
First Lieutenant

WILEY S. TAYLOR
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

GEORGE BECHTEL
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

HARRY K. BLAKE
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

WILLIAM J. CANTWELL
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN D. CARTER
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
HAROLD C. CHAPLIN
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
CHARLES E. CHAPMAN
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
BUFORD T. CLARK
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
WILLIAM F. CROWLEY
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
JOSEPH W. DAVIDSON
Second Lieutenant

ANDREW W. FULLER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

CALVIN H. GIBSON, JR.
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

LEON H. GOLINSKY
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

GORDON M. GRAHAM
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN E. GUINN
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[68]

[page break]

[Photograph]
EDGAR W. HAGEMEIER
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
MYRON A. HUSTON, JR.
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
MARVIN E. JACOBS
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
RICHARD B. JEFFREY
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
RALPH F. JORGENSEN
First Lieutenant

LAWRENCE P. GIARRIZZO
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JACK F. KELLER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

CLIFFORD J. KRONAUER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

PAUL E. LEAS
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

HAROLD O. LUNN
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
JOHN R. MARTIN
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
EUGENE K. MAXWELL
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
HOLT A. MURRAY
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
RALPH PAPANI, JR.
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
EUGENE A. PERESICH, JR.
First Lieutenant

ROBERT G. PETRANEK
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

GEORGE F. ROBERTS
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

LOUIS J. DeSAUDRO
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN A. SHAW
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

CHARLES T. SHEAN, II
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[69]

[page break]

[Photograph]
WILBUR R. SHEIBLE
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
HOWARD G.SHIDAL
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
WILBERT D. SHOCKLEY
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
HOWARD W. SIMCOX
First Lieutenant

EARLE M. SMITH
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

RALPH L. THOMAS
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

ROBERT E. TRIMBLE
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

GORDON S. TURNER
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
CLYDE R. VAN HORN
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
GORDON O. VARNEAU
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
MARK H. VINZANT
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
EDGAR S. WARDELL
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
GEORGE G. WHITE
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
HIRIAM H. WHITE, JR.
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
DAVID B. WHITLOCK
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
HOLLIE L. WHITTEMORE, JR.
Second Lieutenant

[70]

[page break]

GROUND AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

[Photograph]
CHARLES N. BEHRENS
Major

[Photograph]
ELLIS A. MANSHIP
Major

[Photograph]
JOHN H. BARTON
Captain

ANTHONY V. BENINCASA
Captain
[Photograph]

J.E. BROKAW
Captain
[Photograph]

DONALD R. FERRIS
Captain
[Photograph]

ALBERT S. GUERRINA
Captain
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
GEORGE O. HANFORD
Captain

[Photograph]
ROBERT C. INGRAM
Captain

[Photograph]
CLAUDE H. IRBY
Captain

[Photograph]
H. STEWART JOHNSTON
Captain

[71]

[page break]

[Photograph]
ALFRED M. MARTIN
Captain

[Photograph]
MICHAEL R. ZITO
Captain

[Photograph]
HERMAN SCHRAMM
Captain

[Photograph]
J. WILLIAM WELLS
Captain

[Photograph]
LAWRENCE A. CLANCY
First Lieutenant

FRANK S. COHEN
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

CYRIL R. CULP
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

ABE L. FEUER
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

HARVEY J. GRAY
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN T. HIGGINS
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
PALEAMON L. HILSMAN
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
J.J. MALONE
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
JOSEPH I. MATHIS
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
LEONARD J. MILLER
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
GERALD E. MILLER
First Lieutenant

RONALD D. MILLER
Captain
[Photograph]

CLYDE R. MOSES
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

EDWARD B. RANDALL
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

FRANK A. SHARP
Captain
[Photograph]

JOHN O. SHOLAR
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[72]

[page break]

[Photograph]
JOHN J. SQUADRITO
Captain

[Photograph]
FRED S. SWAFFIELD, JR.
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
JAMES T. THOMAS, JR.
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
ALFRED P. VALENTINE
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
WILLIAM D. WARRICK
First Lieutenant

ALBERT S. WHITFIELD, JR.
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

FREDERICK H. WILLCOX
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

MALCOLM C. ALFRIEND
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

ROBERT W. BAILEY
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN N. BEASLEY
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
GEORGE G. EMBICK
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
OSBORN B. HEYWARD
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
EARL D. JAMES
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
SYRUS H. JOHNSON
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
JOHN M. LEEPER
Second Lieutenant

ATHOL D. LIVELY
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOSEPH J. O’HANLON, JR.
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

JOHN J. O’MARA
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

PHILLIP F. STARKMAN
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

MILTON WAYNE
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[73]

[Photograph]
JAMES L. PATTERSON
Captain

[Photograph]
DONALD M. WRIGHT
Captain

[Photograph]
ROBERT T. HALL
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
FRED H. KUHLMAN
First Lieutenant

[Photograph]
FRANK W. GARWACKI
First Lieutenant

COCHRAN FIELD NURSES

ROSA LEE FAGGART
First Lieutenant
[Photograph]

MARGARET R. BUCKO
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

MARGARET E. DANIEL
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

MARGARET HEATH
Second Lieutenant
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
VIRGINIA G. JOHNSTON
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
THERESA A. MEDLIN
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
MIRIAM R. PIERCE
Second Lieutenant

[Photograph]
BERTIE MAE RHODES
Second Lieutenant

[74]

[page break]

[Photograph]
JAMES L. KEITH
Flight Lieutenant

[Photograph]
CHARLES P. ALLEN

[Photograph]
CYRIL D. BEST

[Photograph]
MAURICE K. CHICK

BRITISH PILOT OFFICERS

ALSTAIR A. CROSSE
[Photograph]

C.S. DILLIMORE
[Photograph]

D. GIFTKINS
[Photograph]

LEONARD J. KENT
[Photograph]

RALPH KIRKER
[Photograph]

[Photograph]
CYRIL G.F. PARSONS

[Photograph]
DENNIS H. PAYNE

[Photograph]
GEORGE A. RICHARDS

[Photograph]
FRANCIS W. SAVAGE

[Photograph]
GEOFFREY TASKER

[75]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (AMERICANS)

[Photograph]
FRANK W. ISEMAN
Major
Commandant of Cadets

[1 row of 4 photographs]
Cadets Adams, Stephen Shepherd; Banks, John Wilbur; Benson, Bertil Emil William; Brooks, Dudley Wilder.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Brusek, Frank Anthony; Carroll, James Leo, Jr.; Casey, James Francis; Cook, Coleman Bertram, Jr.; Corrie, Wirt Haley; Dobkowski, Joseph Thaddeus; Gianforte, Joseph Charles.

Second Row: Cadets Harvey, Elliot Bishop; Herrmann, Robert Henry; Hoelzer, Kenneth William; Hogue, Lucius Matlock; Holstein, Elmer Merriman; Hungerpiller, James Arthur, Jr.; Kelley, William Arlington.

[76]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (AMERICANS)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Kernodle, Harold Lee; King, Joseph Hoffman; Kubasak, Emil Steve; McAdams, William Benton; McLaughlin, James Joseph; Millett, Clyde Lawrence; Morris, James Cleveland.

Second Row: Cadets Muir, Donald Watson; Netzer, John Joseph, Jr.; Newman, Riley Rape; Olfston, Junior Walter; Parker, Gerald Arthur; Peterson, Cletus William; Reeder, Owen.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Ridemour, John Western; Rock, James Francis; Root, Francis Henry; Rowe, Scott Rumnels; Simmonds, Harold Maurer; Smith, Frederick Noah, Jr.; Smith, Harry Franklin, Jr.

Second Row: Cadets Smith, Kenneth Barton; Smith, Kirby Enos; Smith, Robert David; Sykes, William Joseph; Wallace, Joseph Wilkins, Jr.; Williams, Thomas Albert; Woodroofe, Philip Benson.

[77]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (AMERICANS)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Allison, George Frederick; Arnspiger, Varney Clyde, Jr.; Austin, Daniel Vincent; Barnett, Clarence Vernon; Barry, Gerald Hayes; Battalore, John Russell; Beake, William Gunther.

Second Row: Cadets Belenky, Eli Larry; Bolton, Louis Saul; Bond, Willis Franklin; Bruther, John Richard; Caldwell, Carlos Freeman; Carter, John Tredway; Caseley, Raymond Perrie.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Clodfelter, Thomas Clarence; Cohalan, Eugene Conway; Commins, Louis Shelly; Corwin, Joseph Bower; Cromer, Harold Nicholas; Cymbalak, Michael; Davis, George Porter.

Second Row: Cadets Donovan, Neil Charles; Duesing, Louis James; Durbin, Robert Frederic; Egan, James Martin; Ericson, Allan Oscar; Evans, Robert Jay; Farley, Robert Henry.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Fellows, John Baptiste; Ferriss, Lester Ruthven, Jr.; Fowle, John Allen; Frey, Ernest Albin; Gage, John Oliver; Gerber, Frank Andrew, Jr.; Gordon, Allan Thomas Jr.

Second Row: Cadets Gramzinski, Arthur William; Grandy, Howard Leon; Gruden, Peter William, Jr.; Hackett, Earl Thomas; Harrold, James Franklin; Haverlin, Jack Flehro; Hensley, Clarence Everette.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (AMERICANS)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Hill, LeRoy Carlile, Jr.; Hodgen, Robert Johnston; Hodowski, Leo Maxmilian; Jones, William Thomas; Knowlton, Kenneth Stebbins; Kuch, Theodore Horner, Jr.; Levy, Robert Maurice.

Second Row: Cadets McFadden, Kenneth Laurie; McNeill, Herbert Warren; Metz, Charles Frederick, Jr.; Michael, Florence Sherwood, Jr.; Mitchell, John Thomas, Jr.; Moore, Robert Lee; Myers, Max.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Ohl, Charles Owen; Parke, William Neel; Paton, George; Pollingue, Alvin Michael; Pultz, Frank Howard; Revoir, Kenneth Joseph; Richman, Mac.

Second Row: Cadets Roman, Julio Enrique; Schley, John Dearing, Jr.; Shankle, Willard Mayes; Sherman, Gilbert Roger; Smith, George Fisher; Smith, Robert Malcolm; Smith, Warwick Vosper.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Sommers, Paul Adams; Spelman, Robert Arthur; Stan, Raymond Henry; Stanley, Carl Seaton; Swartz, Alan; Tanner, William Frank; Terry, Prosper Umbert.

Second Row: Cadets Tilotta, Anthony; Topham, Arthur Hallett; Upchurch, Joseph Staley; Wemple, Donald Lester; Wight, Douglas Roberts; Witoff, Arnold Abraham; Woodson, William Drake.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (BRITISH)

[Photograph]
JAMES KEITH
Flight Lieutenant

[1 row of 3 photographs]
Cadets Adams, Cyril Gilbert Roy; Adams, Thomas Eric; Addis, Harold William.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Allden, Basil Eric Edward; Astle, Charles Wilson; Baxter, Alan Russell; Beveridge, James Lawrence; Bingham, Frank William; Black, Ian Campbell Bennett; Blades, Donald John Morrison.

Second Row: Cadets Bolam, Warwick Hall; Bolton, Wm.; Botsford, Robert Harry; Bowman, Alexander Henderson; Boyd, Richard Edwin; Breffit, Raymond Hulley; Brooks, Oliver Villiers.

[80]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Brothwell; Robert Sidney; Brown, Frank; Bryan, Maurice; Brydson, John Alexander; Canham, Morris William; Carey, John Charles; Champion, Ronald Treweeke.

Second Row: Cadets Charlton, John; Chatting, Kenneth Frederick; Cheek, Richard Leslie William; Christie, Brian Hamilton; Christison, Albert Ernest; Clague, William Henry; Clements, Walter Leonard.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Coe, Dennis Norton; Cooper, Norman Maylin; Cooper, Peter Frederick; Cowell, Dennis William George; Cray, Stanley; Creed, Frank Charles; Daniel, Arthur James.

Second Row: Cadets Dart, Anthony Christopher; Davie, Charles Kenneth; Davies, Kenneth Thomas; Davies, William Norman; Davison, Kenneth Arthur Frederick; Draycott, Sydney; Dunn, James.

[81]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Elder, Edward Vladimir Austin; Eldridge, Douglas Reginald George; Ervine, William Denis; Fenner, David Hendry; Findlay, George Allan; Fisher, Leonard William; Ford, Robert John.

Second Row: Cadets Frost, T.J.; Gibbons, Howard Paistowe; Gibson, Robert Brumwell Desmond; Gilmour, James Murray; Goodwin, Richard M.; Grant, William Joseph; Gray, David Anthony Athelstan.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Gregory, Bruce Leonard; Hadwin, Derrick; Harrison, Charles, Haye, Norman Raymond; Hayward, Robert Frederick; Heard, Stephen Arthur; Herrick, Charles H.

Second Row: Cadets Hicks, Reginald Jack; Hunter, Hugh Fraser; Huxstep, Maurice; Inshaw, Eric Norman; Isaacson, Aubrey; Isard, Phillip C.; Jackson, Donald Herbert.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Johnson, Victor Horace; Jupp, Harold Edward; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Large, Ronald Dive; Larkin, Kenneth Richard; Lillie, Gerald Ernest; Lodge, Joe Thomas.

Second Row: Cadets MacKenzie, Alasdair Leslie; Maltese, Francis Reginald Antony; Marsh, Kenneth Ernest Mark; McDougall, Robert; McManus, Charles Patrick; Medcalf, Henry John; Miller, Stanley Edward.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
UPPER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Milne, Alec; Milsom, Geoffrey William; Mitchell, Willie; Molyneux, William A.; Moran, Leonard Edward; Munro, Donald John; Nicholls, Bernard.

Second Row: Cadets Nichols, John Francis; Ormston, John Thornton; Parkinson, Ronald Chesterton; Payne, Peter Henry; Picot, Raymond Charles; Plumb, Donald Ivan; Puddephat, Leslie Thomas.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Rogers, Eric Oswald; Sampson, Kenneth John; Saunders, James John Milne; Savage, Leslie Norman Gordon; Smith, John Edward; Starling, Frank Edward; Stephenson, Jack.

Second Row: Cadets Stimpson, Maurice Cecil; Storer, Colin Harrison; Swain, Matthew Alec; Taylor, Arthur Graham John; Taylor, Harold James Strickland; Thirkell, Albert; Thorpe, Alan.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Topping, Thomas; Trew, Leonard Frederick; Waldron, William George; Walker, Frederick John Thomas; Wallani, Edward L.; Ward, Ernest Frederick; Ward, James Francis.

Second Row: Cadets Warnes, Charles Arthur; Warwick, Harold Frank; Wears, James; West, Joseph Bernard; White, Kenneth Peter; Willey, Frank Noble Edward; Williams, Derek Gordon.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (BRITISH)

[1 row of 3 photographs]
Cadets Adams, Donald Albert; Adamson, William Ian; Affleck, Douglas, Jr.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Ainsworth, Kenneth William; Ames, Kenneth Robert; Appleby, Ronald Kendrick; Ashton, James; Ashton, William; Ball, Frank; Barr, William, Jr.

Second Row: Cadets Barry, Claude Van Renen; Barton, Cyril Joe; Beattie, Frederick Donald; Bellis, John Lynton; Binney, Robert; Bishop, William John Barrie; Blow, Harold.

[84]

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Booth-Smith, Peter William, Boulter, Herbert Edward; Braund, John Prower; Braund, Marwood Paul; Brightwell, Geoffrey Charles; Broadhurst, Leonard James; Brookes, Eric William.

Second Row: Cadets Brown, Allan Arthur; Brown, Peter Knight; Browne, Ronald George; Bruce, Derek James; Bull, Edward Bert; Bullus, Alfred, Jr.; Carter, Philip Henry.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Chapman, Herbert Henry; Cheal, Druce James Henry; Clift, Stanley William; Cole, Frederick Walter; Collins, Peter Oswald; Cromarty, John Donald Rangs; Cutler, Joseph Henry Frederick.

[page break]

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Edgington, William Philip; Edwards, Alan Claud; Ellis, Kenneth Albert Jackson; Evans, Reginald William George; Fanning, Thomas William Beeching; Farmer, Stanley Arthur Frederick; Feaver, Reginald James.

Second Row: Cadets Fenning, Ernest Hatfield; Firth, John Arthur; Flyn, James Henry; Forryan, Donald Percy; Forsythe, James Roy; Fox, Albert Thomas; Fuller, Russell Edwards.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Gallop, Roy; Gibson, Thomas, Jr.; Gilham, William Henry; Goldring, James David Spencer; Gosling, Harry, Jr.; Grayson, Harry; Hannigan, Cyril Richard.

Second Row: Cadets Hardwick, Dennis Henden; Harper, Raymond Thomas; Harrison, Geoffrey Dennis; Haymes, John Dominic, Jr.; Hayward, John Anthony; Heller, Peter Kevin; Helmore, Terence Martin.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Henderson, George Neville; Hewett, Thomas Hugh; Hicks, Raymond James Edgcomb; Holes, Leslie George; Holland, Dennis; Horler, Harold; Horspool, Jack Higginson.

Second Row: Cadets Hunt, Derrick; Hurley, Daniel James; Illston, Robert Kenneth; Jeffrey, Peter Law; Jewell, Ronald James Martin; Johnston, Albert; Johnson, Eric.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Keeling, Arthur Edward; Kent, Ronald Herbert; Key, Evelin Leon Joseph; King, John Edwin Thomas; Kirby, Geoffrey Phillip; Kirkpatrick, James Harvey; Knight, Frank Roy.

Second Row: Cadets Knott, Kenneth Sidney; Lamb, Ian Inglis; Lawler, Maurice Rupert; Lett, John Joseph; Lewis, Allan Bennett; Lofthouse, Gerald; MacDonald, William Ian.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Mallon, John Leslie; Mandelson, Norman Peter; Marks, Anthony Raymond; McIntyre, Peter James; Mills, Maurice William; Myers, Granville; Neil, Ronald Frederick.

Second Row: Cadets Neilson, Thomas; Norris, John Henry; Oram, Dennis James; Partridge, Hubert Robert Frederick; Phippen, Charles Dennis; Pinkerton, Thomas Colville; Porter, Reginald Edward.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Postlethwaite, Gordon; Powell, J.E.; Price, Eric David George; Proudfoot, Robert Laval; Ralph, James William; Ramsay, Kenneth William; Reed, Arthur.

Second Row: Cadets Reed, William Charles; Richardson, Colin; Ricketts, Alexander Campbell; Robinson, Adrian John D’Egar; Routledge, William Burrell; Rowland, Roland William; Ruff, William Frederick.

[page break]

AVIATION CADETS
LOWER CLASS (BRITISH)

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Saunders, Maurice Walter; Short, Roger Lee; Slipper, Desmond Wallace; Slimon, John; Smith, John Batten; Smith, Stanley Ernest; Smith, William Richard Cuffel.

[2 rows of 7 photographs]
First Row: Cadets Tucker, Anthony Maxwell; Turner, Herbert Henry; Twitt, George Henry; Varley, Francis George; Wallace, Edward Peter; Wallnutt, Bernard Joseph; Walton, Peter Anderson.

Second Row: Cadets Warburton, Cyril; Watkins, Robert Frank; West, Kenneth Leonard, Wheeler, William Francis, Jr.; White, Frank Anthony; Whitelock, Norman Henry; Wigelsworth, Robert Armfield.

[1 row of 4 photographs]
Cadets Wills, George Saunders; Wilson, Jeremy Charles; Wiscombe, Rex Edward; Wolfe, Williams Reginald.

[88]

[page break]

61ST AIR BASE HEADQUARTERS AND AIR BASE SQUADRON

[8 rows of 5 photographs]

[photograph]
JAMES T. PATTERSON
Captain
Squadron Commander

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Parker, Wilmer A.; First Sergeants Burdick, J.C.; Holmstrom, George A.; Technical Sergeants Dill, Luther E.; Fleming, Newell D.

Second Row: Technical Sergeants Herbert, Rex M.; Laverty, Dennis G.; Robertston, Brent; Stovall, Frank S.; Wynne, Owen G.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants Bedsole, Andrew; Blake, James E.; Bush, John W.; Clifford, Stephen J.; Fugere, Lucien G.

Fourth Row: Staff Sergeants Goldsmith, Carl S.; Goldstine, Martin L.; Greenfield, Harry; Gunn, Denzal; Guzak, Peter D.

Fifth Row: Staff Sergeants Hansard, Lester B.; Hill, Vincent A.; Kubler, Charles A.; Laney, Albert G.; Larson, Allan J.

Sixth Row: Staff Sergeants Leonard, Frank M.; Moore, Wilber G.; Reed, Harold J.; Seay, William M.; Short, William B.

Seventh Row: Staff Sergeants Spadafore, James A.; Thiele, Karl G.; Welch, Willie G.; White, Thomas H.; Sergeant Allen, Roy H.

Ninth Row: Sergeants Barton, Joe T.; Blake, Harold L.; Blankenbaker, William G.; Booth, Mose B., Jr.; Bromley, William A.

[89]

[page break]

61ST AIR BASE HEADQUARTERS AND AIR BASE SQUADRON

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Carlisle, Charles D.; Cohen, Leonard; Denmead, Edward; Fischer, Werner; Flanders, Hubert L.

Second Row: Sergeants Gordon, W.F., Jr.; Gower, Robert L.; Groo, Richard D.; Gugle, Eugene D.; Hartin, Arlie.

Third Row: Sergeants Hess, Joseph E.; Hollenberg, Elmer M.; Juneau, Dominique; Kasnevich, Alex; Knowlder, Charles F.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Kornhoff, Elmer D.; Krajeski, William S.; La Pointe, Percy J.; Lenz, Emmett M.; Marchione, Leo M.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Masters, Arthur E.; Milne, Jack H.; Pierce, Weston V.; Postle, Paul W.; Poulos, James G.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Rogers, George; Rollins, J.; Louis P.; Shepherd, Robert B.; Simmons, William C.

Seventh Row: Sergeants Thelen, Arthur F.; Tinney, Jack G.; Waugh, Harold C.; White, Alan D.; Wolff, Theodore H.

Eighth Row: Sergeants Worthey, Ernest W.; Zelonis, Edward J.; Corporals Allen, Robert H.; Andelman, Morris H.; Angelica, Salvatore B., Jr.

Ninth Row: Corporals Blake, Marvin G.; Brewer, William H.; Briney, Leo M.; Bunting, Howard S.; Carpenter, Glenn R.

Tenth Row: Corporals Cox, Donald C.; Doughty, Ennis N.; Dunn, James F.; Evans, Virgil R.; Freeman, Fred H.

[90]

[page break]

61ST AIR BASE HEADQUARTERS AND AIR BASE SQUADRON

(Reading from Left to Right)

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

First Row: Corporals Griffin, Henry S.; Howland, Lawrence R.; Kern, Melville C.; Kilcorse, William P.; King, Harvey L.

Second Row: Corporals Krumholz, Peter N.; Kucinski, Walter; Lineberger, Herbert M.; Lundelius, Raymond L.; Lutz, Ewing M.

Third Row: Corporals Machtemes, John P.; Mankinen, Vilho V.; Mathern, Albert J.; McIntosh, William L.; Moody, Philip W.

Fourth Row: Corporals Nutter, George L.; Peedin, Albert F.; Phillips, Frank; Pondillo, James G.; Raymond, Frederick W.

Fifth Row: Corporals Riffe, Herman C.; Russo, Andrew; Shindelus, Theodore H.; Solt, Cornelius J.; Straub, Charles E.

Sixth Row: Corporals Sudduth, William L.; Suknaic, Stephen J.; Trudeau, Donald B.; Veltre, Edward C.; Wages, Clarence I.

Seventh Row: Corporals Walls, John H.; Weller, Harold D.; Welter, Donald L.; White, Charles E.; Technician Fifth Grade Calloway, Robert C.; Jr.

Eighth Row: Technicians Fifth Grade Kemp, Howell E.; Pastuszak, Raymond; Whitaker, Charles W.; Privates First Class Ash, George A.; Bodarky, Clifford L.

Ninth Row: Privates First Class Bruell, Frederick M.; Cullname, John R.; Damico, Joseph S.; Klavuhn, A.H.; McKeague, Bruce E.

Tenth Row: Privates First Class Neal, Perry W.; Newton, Robert E.; Purificato, Generose J.; Reed, Walter W.; Scarbrough, Frank R.

[91]

[page break]

61ST AIR BASE HEADQUARTERS AND AIR BASE SQUADRON

[9 Rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates First Class Schiffman, Max; Sidoli, Andrew J.; Slivinsky, John; Smith, Max H.; Stringer, Kenneth L.; Thomason, Lance D.

Second Row: Private First Class Tumey, Robert L.; Privates Andrews, Wayne S.; Bailey, Edward J.; Barten, Melvin F.; Bartkowiak, Joseph; Bartlow, Howard L.

Third Row: Privates Blanton, Curtis L.; Boushaw, Howard H.; Boyd, James C.; Brashear, Clyde T.; Braswell, Ernest R.; Bridges, William H.

Fourth Row: Privates Bokaw, Thornton F.; Browning, Newt B.; Carey, John J.; Carson, James F.; Close, James E.; Corne, James A.

Fifth Row: Privates Culler, Joe H.; Curry, James M.; Davis, Bedford L.; Davis, John T.; Davis, Marvin F.; Dennis, William J.

Sixth Row: Privates DiBauda, Louis J.; Dill, Nelson W.; Dowell, Ralph H.; Fakes, John M.; Fisher, Albert F.; Fleischer, Martin A.

Seventh Row: Privates Fortuna, Alex C.; Fortune, Willie B.; Foster, Ray; Free, James F. Jr.; Fritsch, Clifford J.; Garman, Harry.

Eighth Row: Privates Garrard, Roy; Goldsberry, Herbert; Gnotta, Leo A.; Greene, Paul C.; Griffin, Edward K.; Heckle, Irving J.

Ninth Row: Privates Heller, Robert C.; Heyner, Frank W. Jr.; Hires, Walter B.; Hollis, Rufus W.; Holodick, Michael J.; Hummell, Jack H.

[92]

[page break]

61ST AIR BASE HEADQUARTERS AND AIR BASE SQUADRON

[9 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 3 photographs]

(Reading from left to right)

First Row: Privates Isaksen, Albert A.; Johnson, Claude E.; Johnson, Roe H.; Jones, John L.; Jones, Teddy L.; Kammer, Arthur B.

Second Row: Privates Kanoza, Mitchell; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kelly, J.D.; Korbein, Wilbur O.; Krupa, Conrad T.; Kulstein, David I.

Third Row: Privates Kuyers, Raymond C.; Ladegast, Oscar H.; Lake, Frank V.; LaLiberte, Roland R.: Lamkin, James E.; Lawless, Clifford F.

Fourth Row: Privates Lewis, Valda A.; Lindahl, Bruce M.; Lippman, Herbert J.; Lycos, Paul W.; Macken, Francis C.; Marchewka, Frank.

Fifth Row: Privates Mau, Henry G.; McBrearty, Charles F.; McDonald, Thomas J. Jr.; McGee, Harold W.; Moate, Wendell S.; Moessen, Herman G.

Sixth Row: Privates Morrone, A.R.; Nathan, Ralph M.; Nicholls, Clifford L.; Nicholson, Wesley R.; Packett, Sedrick O.; Pasquinelli, Phillip P.

Seventh Row: Privates Peterson, William E.; Pridmore, Leonard; Proctor, Kennth D.; Purdy, James S.; Repko, Joseph J.; Ruppert, Joseph C.

Eighth Row: Privates Ruttenberg, Robert L.; Shuart, Clifford J.; Stith, Forest B.; Taylor, Harold K.; Tomlinson, Charles F.; Tracey, Carl J.

Ninth Row: Privates Tries, Enlow E.; Tuite, Richard J.; Voorhies, Donald S.; Wells, J.D.; White, Robert; Woodruff, Geo. R.

Tenth Row: Privates Wroble, Joseph W.; Zaruba, Elston G.; Zick, Joseph J.

[93]

[page break]

321ST SCHOOL SQUADRON

[Photograph]
BERTRAM H. WITHAM, JR.
Captain
Squadron Commander

[4 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

(Reading from left to right)

First Row: First Sergeant Arman, Robert S.; Technical Sergeants Bulka, Peter; Coffey, Edward H.; Fountain, Rufus C.; Martin, Andrew J.; O’Neal, James M.

Second Row: Technical Sergeants Richey, Leo; Scaggs, Wick K.; Staff Sergeant Bolduc, Raymond H.; Brock, James V.; Burns, Bernard; Gibson, Leon F.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants Ginaitt, Bernard G.; Hanson, Hjalmar J.; Patterson, Edgar E.; Roberts, Gilbert B.; Rudde, Clemens A.; Sallen, Eugene G.

Fourth Row: Staff Sergeants Sermon, Albert J.; Weaver, Horace L.; Werner, George; Sergeants Barbour, David A.; Bard, George L.; Beazley, Malcolm K.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Bent, Allen E.; Brasher, Robert L.; Brooks, Billy B.; Caratenuto, Joseph P.; Cavanaugh, Edward.

[94]

[page break]

321ST SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Diorio, Joseph J.; Doney, John R.; DuBois, Dean A.; Earle, Albert G.; Goodman, Louis; Green, William.

Second Row: Sergeants Gustafson, Leonard, A.; Hahn, Herman R.; Hall, Orie L.; Hand, Bliss A.; Harju, Eli M.; Johnson, Charles.

Third Row: Sergeants Kapner, Kermit H.; Klawitter, Franklin; Larkin, Joseph A.; Lortz, Fred E. Jr.; Lyle, James L.; Mackinnon, Harold W.

Fourth Row: Sergeants McLaughlin, Eugene J.; Miller, G.F.; Moore, Max J.; Popek, John P.; Pescott, Sewell E.; Prunty, Ardeth D.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Rapp, David; Reinhardt, Richard J.; Renfroe, Douglas M.; Repici, Angelo J.; Roemer, Carl E.; Schultz, Albert A.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Skolsky, John H. Jr.; Starinieri, Frank; Tillotson, William B.; Tokach, Daniel; Vaughan, Edwin A.; Walcott, Philip T.

Seventh Row: Sergeant Whitaker, Leroy C.; Corporals Bracy, Ronald P.; Brent, Landon H.; Buckley, Mariott B.; Clark, Alfred A.; Cobb, Harold C.

Eighth Row: Corporals Cooper, John J.; Crane, Harold D.; Czartowicz, Leo; Debonis, Alphone; Elms, Randle D.; Eyges, Edward.

Ninth Row: Corporals Ferris, Claude J.; Goldney, John H.; Hewitt, Dorance G.; Hodges, Asa G. Jr.; Hounsell, Philip B.; Jackson, Larry E.

Tenth Row: Corporals Kaminsky, Albert H.; Kohl, Robert E.; Kovalycsik, Robert A.; Krieger, Charles; Maietta, Patsy R.; Matern, Herman A.

[95]

[page break]

321ST SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Corporals McCleery, John J.; Metzdorf, Robert C.; Palmer, Paul E.; Ringwood, James F.; Salvatore, Albert P.; Saunders, Robert N.

Second Row: Corporals Thomas, Paul E.; Vigliotti, Andrew V.; Privates First Class Andrews, George T.; Broome, James T.; Carter, Wilburn S.; Chandler, Sequard E.

Third Row: Privates First Class Green, James D.; Hills, James; Piccolo, Joseph J.; Private Anderson, Samuel W.; Arney, John R.; Atchley, Fred J.

Fourth Row: Privates Baxter, Robert D.; Bell, John J.; Berkow, Benjamin L.; Bonds, Rader J.; Brady, Robert J.; Brigham, Clarence.

Fifth Row: Privates Brown, Russell F.; Bunton, Oscar F. Jr.; Byrd, Elmer E.; Carroll, James; Chicha, Milan; Cleghorn, John G.

Sixth Row: Privates Cowan, Edward; Cronk, Earl W.; Dahlstrom, Robert O.; Denesiuk, Nicholas L.; DeVito, Frank; Donecho, James Jr.

Seventh Row: Privates Dressler, Stanley; Eckart, Joseph C.; Farese, William A.; Farrell, William M.; French, John Thomas; Gallagher, Myles W.

Eighth Row: Privates Gloystein, Robert E.; Goldberg, Jack; Gosa, Earl J.; Gould, Edward; Graham, Marvin C.; Gray, Robert E.

Ninth Row: Privates Greenfeder, Herman; Gregg, George F.; Hannon, Joseph F.; Hearn, Frank C.; Hebrock, Charles S.; Hemion, Nelson, Jr.

Tenth Row: Privates Herdt, Lester C. Jr.; Hiland, Edward M.; Holland, Thomas F. Jr.; Johnson, Joseph O.; Jorishie, Jacob W.; Kapsner, Edmund L.

[96]

[page break]

321ST SCHOOL SQUADRON

[7 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]
[2 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Kelly, James A.; Lamson, Robert; Lang, Gerald; Large, George A.; LaVoie, Warren M.; Manz, Carl H.

Second Row: Privates Marino, George; Mathieson, Thomas H. Jr.; McCann, Charles F.; McCullough, Samuel, Milano, Anthony Jr.; Morton, Julius.

Third Row: Privates Moye, Earl V.; Mynyk, Michael; Norton, Clifford; Oller, George B.; Ponas, Harry; Reed, David H.

Fourth Row: Privates Repole, Angelo V.; Romotsky, Isadore; Russo, Frank; Shoaff, Earl E.; Shome, Carl W.; Smith, Oma S.

Fifth Row: Privates Staub, Frank T.; Trombley, Donald J.; Vitalbo, Julius N.; Warren, John E.; Weinstock, Solomon; Weiss, Donald C.

Sixth Row: Privates Whitley, Jesse John; Whippel, Harold F.; Wilkowski, Edward J.; Williams, Arthur F.; Williams, Charles E.; Winn, Horace M.

Seventh Row: Privates Womack, George H.; Woodward, William R.; Yergens, Jack W.; Zakrzewski, Clarence A.; Zembenski, Leonard W.; Zimmermann, John G.

Eighth Row: Attached Personnel, Staff Sergeant P’Pool, E.L.; Sergeants Booth, Lester H.; Britt, David A.; Schulz, William R.; Stehlik, Irvin F.

Ninth Row: Sergeant Swenson, Elbert H.; Corporal Brady, Charles E.; Chumbley, Paul E.; Cummings, William J.; Ortlip, Howard S.; Private First Class Kenaga, Grant J.

Tenth Row: Privates Carroll, Gerald E.; David, Walter A.; Hill, Frank D.; Shepherd, John B.; Standage, Duane E.; Witze, Huhgie F.

[97]

[page break]

322ND SCHOOL SQUADRON

[Photograph]
DONALD M. ALEXANDER
Major
Commanding

[6 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Garrett, H.J.; First Sergeant Axford, W.R.; Technical Sergeants Goodman, Troy A.; Lilliott, J.K.; Marti, J.L.; Wallace, Dell T.

Second Row: Staff Sergeants Anglin, Lewis L.; Dail, B.; Fisher, William M.; Flanagan, J.C.; Galligan, F.J.; Grondalski, Francis P.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants Karajian, B.M.; Lowik, O.J.; Maguire, John J.; Martin, R.A.; Skalicky, W.M.; Sledd, R.J.

Fourth Row: Staff Sergeant Smith, Hoyt R.; Vertrees, E.; Vowels, T.J.; Watson, R.; Whitsitt, W.E.; Winters, H.L.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Back, B.; Chase, Edwin F.; Conto, A.; Collins, Clynton J.; Corder, C.; Dick, Louis C.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Delise, Ralph; Donth, L.W.; Eure, Lankford; Evans, E.; Francescone, Salvatore; Gish, James L.

[98]

[page break]

322ND SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Goff, H.C.; Harmon, James H.; Harmon, J.C.; Holt, M.A.; Huston, C.E.

Second Row: Sergeants Jacobi, Erwin H.; Jakobiec, J.F.; Kelleher, C.P.; Kelly, Joseph J.; Kreutzfeldt, Charles.

Third Row: Sergeants Kuran, J.W.; Kwolek, R.L.; Meade, L.; Meyers, V.; Mihalic, J.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Mills, E.; Norton, D.J.; Pierce, Bob; Pittz, L.J.; Ripking, W.H.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Shrewsbury, James R.; Smith, E.C.; Stamper, Fred; Tedder, A.F.; Vovolka, J.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Welch, P.; Wright, Glenn W.; Corporals Asmus, C.H.; Bauer, Louis H.; Carafello, E.A.

Seventh Row: Corporals Charland, Albert J.; Cook, R.W.; Evans, W.L.; Fisher, Don R.; Floyd, Joe E.

Eighth Row: Corporals Frakes, William g.; Friesen, A.R.; Gardo, N.; Gibson, James H.; Handrow, Wesley A.

Ninth Row: Corporals Havens, W.; Huettig, Hans G.; Johnson, K.W.; Keyser, James A.; Kline, Lawrence R.

[99]

[page break]

322ND SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Corporals Lehner, C.E.; Litsenberger, John A.; Mayse, Richard D.; Metzger, George O.; Moore, Herman W.

Second Row: Corporals Naypaver, Frank J.; Nelson, L.O.; Obosla, J.; O’Neal, Noland L.; Price, Jack J.

Third Row: Corporals Rabinak, K.; Schaefer, O.M.; Siddens, R.; Wiederspahn, Clarence; Private First Class Arnold, Ralph H.

Fourth Row: Privates First Class Britt, Ralph W.; Drayton, A.; Ford, Benjamin F.; Glauberman, J.; Harber, Clarence E.

Fifth Row: Privates First Class Lewis, J.P.; Williams, G.R.; Privates All, Harry; Aune, Earl B.; Ball, Harry N.

Sixth Row: Privates Bryde, Glenn M.; Burgerhoff, William; Busch, Ed.; Caggiano, Ralph; Czajkowski, Leo S.

Seventh Row: Privates Devries, S.; Dittmeier, Raymond e.; Dooley, T.C.; Fox, F.E.; Frank, Lloyd.

Eighth Row: Privates Giele, Louis; Gilley, Lawence L.; Gnatowsky, Emanuel; Gustafson, Edwin A.; Herzog, Henry A.

Ninth Row: Privates Hughes, Robert E.; Hurley, J.J.; Johansen, Harry J.; Kloepfer, Frank M.; Korzun, Frank A.

[100]

[page break]

322ND SCHOOL SQUADRON

[1 row of 3 photographs]
[6 rows of 5 photographs]
[1 row of 3 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

Rirst [sic] Row: Privates Kotarba, W.J.; Lacker, W.W., Lehman, Walter.

Second Row: Privates Lieberman, Louis; Lotus, W.S.; Mackey, E.; McDaniel, Clarence N.; McLellan, A.M.

Third Row: Privates Meyer, Bernard F.; Moss, James J.; Murray, John J.; Newman, E.H.; Novin, Jack.

Fourth Row: Privates Offshany, Edward A.; O’Meara, William P.; Pauley, John L.; Payne, David C.; Perewoznik, Louis P.

Fifth Row: Privates Ranch, John H.; Rice, John J.; Rose, John H.; Rosenberg, E.; Routt, Weldon B.

Sixth Row: Privates Schohl, Albert W.; Sciscoe, Thomas W.; Smestad, H.O.; Staniszewski, E.; Stewart, J.E.

Seventh Row: Privates Wealot, Johnnie H.; Wesenyak, H.; Whittington, Isaac S.; Wilburn, Reed S.; Witt, John H.

Eighth Row: Private Yanik, J.; Attached for Duty and Training, Fortune, W.; Haynes, Jack W.

[101]

[page break]

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON

[Photograph]
CHARLES E. STIVEN
Major
Commanding

[6 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: First Sergeant Reese, Leo E.; Tripple, Herbert S.; Technical Sergeants McCarthey, J.W.; Scott, George E.; Wyndham, C.H.; Staff Sergeants Bennett, P.

Second Row: Staff Sergeants Carr, Archie F.; Frush, Charles E.; Garris, Leonard R.; Guinn, R.; Hull, James J.; Kopczick, R.A.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants Kundrat, M.; O’Donnel, Arthur F.; Palmer, W.D.; Riley, C.W.; Shoup, James C.; Sickers, Jack B.

Fourth Row: Staff Sergeants Simpkins, William T.; Steger, Fred O.; Sturcke, C.H.; Trent, Alva C.; Wagner, Robert C.; Sergeants Allen, Thomas R.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Assidio, Albert A.; Baker, Lewis J.; Bertino, Russell P.; Burress, E.W.; Campbell, Donald E.; Carpenter, Harold C.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Carpenter, Walter L.; Clineman, George F.; Consalvo, J.J.; Couillard, Charles H.; Crist, M.J.; Cutlip, William E.

[102]

[page break]

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Daniels, Joseph J.; Danielson, F.L.; DePalma, Fedele J.; Fishman, H.; Gaines, Joe D.

Second Row: Sergeants Gallo, John J.; Golt, William M.; Hailwood, W.T.; Hill, Henry, I.; Holder, Enos M.

Third Row: Sergeants Howard, Kelly; Jaworski, B.J.; Jacques, Vincent H.; Kasprack, Joseph M.; Lawrence, William D.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Nestor, John; Ovimette, J.F.; Pape, Pasquale A.; Petersen, Lawrence; Pordon, Guido J.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Rich, Richard; Schubert, Charles W.; Schultz, Milton J.; Seward, William H.; Smitson, J.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Swanson, Roy C.; Uhleman, M.; Vavra, Vance L.; Wagner, Louis J.; Ward V.

Seventh Row: Sergeant Young, Oscar R.; Corporals Abel, Jack W.; Accettola, Rocco L.; Assenmacher, John; Bonini, Frank P.

Eighth Row: Corporals Brown, F.H.; Capawana, L.C.; Eldridge, Charles A.; Goodwin, Frederick C.; Herod, John W.

Ninth Row: Corporals Hughes, P.E.; Jackson, Waverly T.; Kalinoski, Theodore W.; Kelly, Lawrence L.; Kleb, William A.

[103]

[page break]

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Corporals Kmiecik, Alfred; Kurley, Donald M.; Malecky, William; Mayberry, Edward R.; McClintock, Calvin L.

Second Row: Corporals McLaughlin, Ellsworth; Mittendorf, William F.; Monks, Theodore V.; Muckleroy, Lance G.; Newman, Alfred.

Third Row: Corporals Nyberg, Francis; Palmer, Arvo O.; Pando, Samuel; Quinn, James P.; Smith, Joseph J.

Fourth Row: Corporals Stupka, Franklin; Suter, Edward M.; Szymczk, Harold J.; Walls, Kenneth; Washler, J.

Fifth Row: Corporal Weiss, William W.; Privates First Class Armstrong, Harold L.; Beaird, Henry E.; Bivens, M.F.; Blair, Robert G.

Sixth Row: Privates First Class Bleck, Frank J.; Bragg, William E.; Burney, William r.; Bush, Harold B.; Drejman, John J.

Seventh Row: Privates First Class Freisen, John; Fulk, Raymond; Hilton, James G.; Howk, Elmer D.; Huniu, Sam.

Eighth Row: Privates First Class Justice, James N.; Labardini, Julius G.; Lafay, George, Sr.; Lent, James; Machado, Richard.

Ninth Row: Privates First Class Maddox, J.W.; William J.; Magalass, J.; Martin, Frank C.; McMinn, Obie D.

Tenth Row: Privates First Class Mellin, Allen; Morgan, Morris E.; Nelson, Clarence G.; Nelson, Roy L.; Pugh, Alfred E.

[104]

[page break]

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates First Class Rowe, Ivan R.; Shinnick, Edward C.; Stone, Richard N.; Van Kleeck, George; Private Andrews, Byron T.

Second Row: Privates Andrus, Walter T.; Atkins, Roy E.; Bader, Abraham; Bailey, Lucius S.; Blackburn, William H.

Third Row: Privates Blickhan, Anthony A.; Bond, Edward J.; Bozzo, John M.; Brackman, Elmer; Briscoe, Joseph P.

Fourth Row: Privates Brumbelow, Ernest C.; Cantrell, Leroy; Carey, Joseph P.; Cassidy, Frank C.; Crom, Edmund A.

Fifth Row: Privates Dadek, Joseph; Davis, Robert R.; Doviak, Steven; Estes, Jerry J.; Feigert, Robert.

Sixth Row: Privates Ferry, Joseph J.; Forseth, Edwin O.; Gillespie, William B.; Godin, Leo M.; Gogan, Francis.

Seventh Row: Privates Gold, Harry; Graves, Conley F.; Halick, John M.; Hake, Paul; Hamoutz, Andrew M.

Eighth Row: Privates Hendrzak, Joseph; Hibner, Chas. H.; Hill, Albert S.; Holeman, Robert L.; Hooker, Leon G.

Ninth Row: Privates Jacobson, Orace J.; Johnson, Roy H.; Kaffenberger, Frederick H.; Kamke, Willard W.; Kelley, Albert J.

Tenth Row: Privates Klitzke, Donald K.; Kosiek, Mitchell S.; Kurkowski, Edward A.; Kurowski, John G.; Lanham, John T.

[105]

[page break]

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 4 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Levy, Stanley H.; Logan, Richard W.; Lukhardt, Hiram E.; Malinowski, Henry J.; Marshall, Stanley E.; Marx, Ralph D.

Second Row: Privates Mascia, Ralph A.; Massey, Emmette B.; McCoy, Charles B.; McGuire, John J.; McLaughlin, James I.; McLaughlin, Ralph W.

Third Row: Privates McMahon, Raymond E.; McNeill, Edward V.; Meiller, James H.; Mulrean, John J.; Murphy, James H.; Mussori, Guy A.

Fourth Row: Privates Nannis, Morton; Norell, Olle A.; Nyeste, John A.; Ouillette, Wilfred J.; Painter, Robert S.; Pantzer, Frank J.

Fifth Row: Privates Price, Charles M.; Paine, L.A.; Remis, Walter A.; Rizzo, Patsy; Schladweiler, Arnold J.; Schiffer, Frank J.

Sixth Row: Privates Schneider, Morris; Schoen, Harry E.; Scully, Walter A.; Seiber, Donald W.; Sloane, Thomas P.; Snyder, Henry F.

Seventh Row: Privates Starkey, Otto W.; Stener, Bernard W.; Thompson, Tilman J.; Tibbetts, Harry; Toci, Bruno; Towers, Lawrence A.

Eighth Row: Privates Triezenberg, Simon; Van Aken, C.E.; Varade, Frank A.; Vaszuez, Gabino L.; Waldrep, William J.; Willem John.

Ninth Row: Privates Wilkerson, Walter Floyd; Wisniewski, Paul; Wittschack, Rudolph H.; Wright, William C.; Zachman, John J.; Zamesnik, Norman C.

Tenth Row: Privates Zintner, Emil, E.; Zmiejko, John J.; Zucca, Merritt F.; Zukowski, Felix.

[106]

[page break]

439TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[Photograph]
S.H. JOHNSON, JR.
Captain
Commanding

[5 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: First Sergeant Gillespie, Earl; Technical Sergeant Noojin, Howard D.; Staff Sergeants Binkley, Howard H.; Bottoms, Ralph S.; Brasher, Arvin B.; Comsia, John.

Second Row: Staff Sergeants Elefterin, John; Felland, Trumen M.; Goldbaugh, James R.; Gregorczik, Edmund; Hall, Emerson G.; King, Harold B.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants McLoughlin, Norbert; Lane, William C.; Rowe, Lloyd A.; Sergeants Beck, Robert W.; Brasher, Rayford L.; Carpenter, Roy W.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Floyd, James H.; Gardner, Richard H.; Godsell, Jack E.; Grantham, George, Jr.; Green Ira W.; Gunn, Jack A.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Hallman, Joseph H.; Jr.; Hejl, Raymond J.; Herd, Charles E.; Hilgren, Victor A.; Hill, Jack C.; Hill, James O.

[107]

[page break]

439TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Hines, Lawrence F.; Howard, Foy J.; Jr.; Howes, Harry R.; Hurdis, Elmer W.; Jagodinski, Walter E.; Jones, Grover C. Jr.

Second Row: Sergeants Kaler, Harold A.; Kane, Leroy J.; Masters, Azel E.; Mulligan, Leo J.; Morgan, Lyle E.; Onsgard, Albertus T.

Third Row: Sergeants Pence, William R.; Ruzicka, Gerald G.; Singleton, Thomas; Smith, Thomas H.; Webb, McKinley; Welborn, Leslie P.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Whitcomb, Peter B.; Williams, Willie M.; Corporals Anderson, James S.; Bussler, Rudyard A.; Chestney, Bard S.; Cobb, Haskell T.

Fifth Row: Corporals Cox, John A.; Dodd, Hugh C.; Griffis, Bryce E.; Harris, Walter A.; Hawkins, Chester E.; Hite, William B.

Sixth Row: Corporals Johnson, Eugene r.; Kess, Raymond P.; Matlock, Samuel A.; McKain, Newell R.; Miller, William F.; Pabich, Francis F.

Seventh Row: Corporals Pennington, Hubert W.; Rodriguez, Celso, Jr.; Spencer, Wayne C.; Smiczek, Leonard J.; Stark, Ernest F.; Walker, Cecil M.

Eighth Row: Corporals Ylimainen, Uno E.; Privates First Class Barrow, Arthur W.; Betts, Albert W.; Bradbury, Frelan C.; Breon, Eugene E.; Charles, Joseph H.

Ninth Row: Privates First Class Cooper, William C.; Cubbedge, David L.; Cummings, Charles E.; Daugherty, James Q.; Kellems, Robert B.; Kottke, Howard H.

Tenth Row: Privates First Class Martin, Loral; Papai, William J.; Ridgeway, John R.; Stump, Ralph R.; Privates Aaron, Harry J. Jr.; Acker, Junior H.

[108]

[page break]

439TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Agnew, James L.; Alquin, Eugene W.; Anderes, Albert C.; Attaway, J.A.E.; Baecker, John A.; Baker, J.W.

Second Row: Privates Baumann, R.A.; Boswell, Bon E. Jr.; Bozmoff, George M.; Bragdon, Lloyd F.; Brazell, Frank W.; Bream, William H.

Third Row: Privates Brodeur, Albert S.; Brown, Willard E.; Burns, Vincent J.; Butsko, J.; Crouch, Glen L.; Davis, Harry R.

Fourth Row: Privates De Vault, John R.; Dixon, Erb T.; Dougherty, Frederick G.; Ewing, Harry S.; Friedel, George R.; Gomery, Clair T.

Fifth Row: Privates Gordon, W.G.; Hassing, Philip; Heider, George R.; Hinkley, Robert W.; Horton, Travis G.; James, Thomas E.

Sixth Row: Privates Jeffreys, Van C.; Kautz, Harold E.; Kramer, Harry W.; Lankowitz, George; Lipis, Elias L.; Locke, Selden B.

Seventh Row: Privates Lyon, Robert V.; McAlpin, Marion B.; McQuillan, Patrick J.; Mandeville, Joseph L.; Mason, M.; Moss, Julius.

Eighth Row: Privates O’Kane, Robert P.; Rafter, Francis E.; Robinson, Arthur W.; Robinson, Horation A.; Schwab, Morris; Schwager, Stephen.

Ninth Row: Privates Seddon, John R.; Simmons, Adelbert P.; Smith, Charles J.; Smith, Herbert B.; Soudant, George D.; Taylor, George A.

Tenth Row: Privates Trombley, Robert R.; Wagner, Joseph D.; Wassilak, Adolph F.; West, Wayne D.; Withelm, James R.

[109]

[page break]

440TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[Photograph]
BISHOP P. PARRISH, JR.
Captain
Commanding

[5 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Rice, Douglas G.; First Sergeant Mitchell, Marston L.; Technical Sergeants Davis, Edward V.; Wiggins, Eugene W.; Staff Sergeants Arrington, Richard; Bacorn, James W.

Second Row: Staff Sergeants Blanchette, Robert A.; Embovitz, Adolph E.; Field, George H.; Gilbertson, Robert L.; Guthrie, James A.; Hewitt, John F.

Third Row: Staff Sergeants Kolling, James A.; Lenz, Clarence A.; MacQuarrie, John M.; Mason, George L.; Morris, Ted; Ordway, Richard.

Fourth Row: Staff Sergeants Pendell, Eugene G.; Seaman, Richard O.; Sergeants Campfield, Arthur W.; Carlo, Samuel S.; Carpenter, Colon T.; Cochran, Jack.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Danforth, Thomas C.; Davis, Howard; Dobberpuhl, Chester A.; Faling, Marvin R.; Foley, Edward C.; Galloway, Leo A.

[110]

[page break]

440TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[9 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Goddard, Clarence L.; Graff, Alvin G.; Hancock, Robert L.; Hoke, Dennis E.; Jarrett, William E.

Second Row: Sergeants Jensen, Howard W.; Jensen, Warren E.; Knight, Evert L.; Kramp, Paul A.; Kunsaitis, Anthony F.

Third Row: Sergeants Lutz, Eugene R. Jr.; McCormick, Kenneth P.; McNeill, John W.; Murray, Paul J.; Newell, William J.

Fourth Row: Sergeants Pochodzay, Marion; Pouliot, Roger; Pounds, Armond H.; Potts, George T.; Risinger, Harry B.

Fifth Row: Sergeants Russell, Ralph K.; Saxton, Cecil G.; Schaefer, Carl J.; Sevier, William F.; Shull, Donald C.

Sixth Row: Sergeants Starr, William G.; Taylor, Kenneth M.; Tribbett, Walter A.; Weronko, Chester J.; Wey, Karl W. Jr.

Seventh Row: Sergeants Whalen, Kenneth L.; Wolak, Edward W.; Woodward, John A.; Corporals Bauman, Jack; Brennan, Bernard.

Eighth Row: Corporals Coil, Stanley F.; Crowley, Bernard J.; Cunnnigham, Richard W. Jr.; Dalby, Charles W.; Forish, Joseph M.

Ninth Row: Corporals Frank, James M.; Fraser, Donald M.; Fritsche, Walter E.; Gilman, Frank R.; Haigh, Harold B.

[111]

[page break]

440TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Corporals Harmon, Bennie D.; Harmon, John R.; Harter, Raymond H.; Hogue, Richard P.; Jett, Malcolm B.

Second Row: Corporals Korns, Dudley W.; Lindy, Ansel; Machaczka, Theodore; Magazzini, Michael; Mayes, Charles E.

Third Row: Corporals Moffett, Raymond P.; Patton, Hugh D.; Reid, Ralph M.; Rickey, John W.; Shields, Kenneth S.

Fourth Row: Corporals Smeck, Harold E.; Smith, Richard C.; Stevens, Loyd H.; Thibodeaux, Joseph N.; Thompson, Kermit L.

Fifth Row: Corporals White, Orin L.; Williams, Walter W.; Woodruff, Donald M.; Wyme, Maurice H.; Private First Class Doane, Edward F.

Sixth Row: Privates First Class Farmer, Carl E.; Fuscaldo, Frank J.; Gayton, Harold T.; Gilbert, Robert C. Jr.; Haidet, Clifford E.

Seventh Row: Privates First Class Harrison, James P.; Margiotta, John, Middleton, John I. Jr.; Oden, James H.; O’Neill, Gilmore.

Eighth Row: Privates First Class Reichart, Ralph R.; Riley, Samuel B.; Sheeran, Francis D.; Siegel, Irving C.; Simpson, Harold E.

Ninth Row: Privates First Class Spetjack, Frank; Stegemann, Gustave E.; Stoddart, James H.; Trickett, Powell N.; Van Doren, Donald J.

Tenth Row: Privates First Class Walters, Paul D.; Wright, Phillip D.; Privates Ash, Richard D.; Bettle, Daniel O.; Blank, Donald C.

[112]

[page break]

440TH SCHOOL SQUADRON

[8 rows of 5 photographs]
[2 rows of 4 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Bode, Robert H.; Bonom, Milton; Borders, Cecil C.; Cation, Paul C.; Clark, Eugene B.

Second Row: Privates Dissen, Joseph P.; Duvall, Lauren L.; Eggen, Byron R.; Enoch, Milton; Fetzer, William W.

Third Row: Privates Fletcher, Kenneth T.; Goldstein, Kolman; Hornberg, Edward H.; Huffmaster, Howard H.; Huhtala, Ernest E.

Fourth Row: Privates James, William L.; Kaminsky, Victor; Knobloch, Wayne R.; Lagalo, Frank; Latham, Marion C.

Fifth Row: Privates Lester, Harold J.; Levy, Gerson; Liscomb, Nile L.; Lyons, Meade G.; Mann, Fred W.

Sixth Row: Privates Matzen, Arthur J.; Mikus, Anthony C.; Murphy, Raymond K.; Myers, Joseph D.; Packard, Robert R.

Seventh Row: Privates Pelensky, Raymond J.; Prasifka, Reyburn J.; Reeves, James B.; Rogal, Melvin; Rowland, Charles H.

Eighth Row: Privates Rucker, Tolbert A.; Shagrin, Louis; Shedlock, John A.; Spuller, George C.; Ter Haar, LeRoi.

Ninth Row: Privates Thompson, James R.; Thornton, Kenneth F.; Tutt, Donald R.; Wagnon, Felton C.

Tenth Row: Attached Men and All Ratings, Sergeant Sisson, Paul L.; Corporal Sannes, Carl A.; Privates Fabec, Frank L.; Gerik, Alvin R.

[113]

[page break]

MILITARY POLICE

[Photograph]
CHARLES R. CROSS
Major
Commanding

[9 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

321ST SCHOOL SQUADRON
First Row: Corporals Buckley, Marriott; D’Agostino, Joseph L.; Kovalik, Robert A.; Private First Class Bailey, Donald W.

322ND SCHOOL SQUADRON
Sergeants Little, James T.; Martin, Marvin.
Second Row: Sergeant McDermitt, John H.; Corporals Brady, John R.; Hatley, Daniel W.; Privates Gilkey, Robert J.; Wyer, James C.

323RD SCHOOL SQUADRON
Sergeant Matthews, Bernard J.
Third Row: Corporals Berry, Lester R.; Paris, John M.

439TH SCHOOL SQUADRON
Staff Sergeant Epsom, George A.; Sergeants Burke, James A.; Fyke, Mayes B.; Jones, Delbert.
Fourth Row: Sergeant Woody, Oren W.; Corporal Fuller, Charles C.; Privates First Class Eversole, Robert J.; Henson, Delbert L.; Ledford, Robert J.; Private Robinson, James H.

440TH SCHOOL SQUADRON
Fifth Row: Sergeant Mobley, John E.; Private First Class Simon, George V.; Private Marconi, Gene J.

61ST AIR BASE SQUADRON
Staff Sergeants Hanfstaengl, Egon L.; Love, John J.; Miles, John J.
Sixth Row: Staff Sergeants Rooksberry, Robert E.; Wortham, B.C.; Sergeants Badgley, Jack L.; Carfello, Louis; Destefano, Joseph G.; Garriott, George A.
Seventh Row: Sergeants Kelly, Edward J.; Naugle, Melvin, L.; Seidler, Frederick W.; Turner, Ray, I.; Corporals Cerulli, Patsy J.; Korba, John.
Eighth Row: Corporals Napolitano, Patsy J.; Palmer, James A.; Shapiro, Joseph; Sullivan, Lester B.; Woznakiewicz, Leon; Private First Class Blanos, George.
Ninth Row: Privates First Class Greenwood, John R.; Kellen, Joseph W.; Rotunno, George G.; Privates Baer, B.T.; Eakley, George; Kershner, Jack.
Tenth Row: Privates McGuire, George W.; Novotny, Steven G.; Serdziak, Edward L.

77TH MATERIEL SQUADRON
Privates First Class Batten, Robert L.; Rea, John F.X.

[114]

[page break]

[Photograph]
J.W. CLARK
Captain
Commanding

BAND

[1 row of 5 photographs]
[3 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 4 photographs]

(Reading from left to right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Wickersham, R.; Staff Sergeant Karstens, F.H.; Sergeants Enckler, H.G.; Gancar, J.W.; Haislup, G.E.

Second Row: Sergeants Holloway, J.B.; Stynosky, G.; Zoller, R.H.; Corporals Feldman, C.; Lee, H.J.; Lowery, R.

Third Row: Corporals Luth, K.E.; Olney, D.H.; Rawles, F.C.; Silverman, M.; Privates First Class Egan, A.W.; Farrell, J.C.

Fourth Row: Privates First Class Lewis, R.; Lumbrazo, A.J.; Scarci, L.A.; Van Duren, W.; Venton, W. Jr.; Wine, R.C.

Fifth Row: Private First Class Zajac, S.J.; Privates Cosenza, G.; Fletcher, H.M.; Roberts, G.

[115]

[page break]

STATION HOSPITAL

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Staff Sergeants Lenhart, Andrew K.; Lockard, George C. Jr.; Sergeant Spanier, Henry; Technician Fourth Grade Levin, Robert; Technicians Fifth Grade Evans, David A.; Kenney, Edmund R.

Second Row: Privates First Class Houser, Michael J.; Kohl, John E.; Stoffa, John; Privates Butcher, William A.; Friedman, Leonard; Lasala, Vincenzo.

Third Row: Privates Mansfield, Thomas J.; Mills, James P.; Pasternak, Samuel; Schames, Abraham A.; Wright, Carl W.

[2 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

VETERINARY DETACHMENT
STATION HOSPITAL

(Reading from Left to Right)
Sergeant Klingenhagen, Henry; Privates Hampton, William W.; Kafka, Henry W.

[1 row of 3 photographs]

[116]

[page break]

MEDICAL DETACHMENT

[Photograph]
WATSON L. LUTHER, JR.
Second Lieutenant
Commanding

[5 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Galatas, Joe H.; First Sergeant Church, Jim A.; Staff Sergeants Haddon, Thomas W.; Lewis, Benjamin H.; Lieberman, Barney.

Second Row: Staff Sergeant Scheuermann, James W.; Sergeants Abernathy, Fletcher C.; Causey, Hilton E.; Craddock, Mike; Korngut, Archie.

Third Row: Sergeants Presley, L.A.; Wertz, Joe L.; Technicians Fourth Grade Heil, John E.; Hockenbury, Robert E.; Horine, Herbert R.

Fourth Row: Technicians Fourth Grade Innella, Michael M.; Kilian, John G.; Killeen, John M.; Corporals Hammer, Rudolph G.; Simchina, Michael.

Fifth Row: Technicians Fifth Grade Grieder, Roy F.; Hayduk, Walter F.; Huttmann, Charles F.; Kaplowitz, Leonard J.; Kleinow, William O.

[117]

[page break]

MEDICAL DETACHMENT

[1 row of 4 photographs]
[6 rows of 5 photographs]
[1 row of 3 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates First Class Cooper, Charles F.; Jr.; Davidson, Charles S.; Deitchman, Joseph; Ewald, Elmer W.

Second Row: Privates First Class Gombkoto, Stephen, Jr.; Massey, John E.; Miller, Albert W.; Miller, Ralph W.; O’Connell, John N.

Third Row: Privates First Class Raimondi, Angelo J.; Sadowitz, Albert; Privates Brown, Arthur J.; Cleveland, Winfred G.; Crowley, Charles H.

Fourth Row: Privates Donahue, Lawrence; Flynn, William J.; Geller, Sidney; Grier, Paul H.; Johnson, Willard E.

Fifth Row: Privates Kania, John; Krotchko, Michael G.; Lapidow, Frank H.; Lee, John H.; Miastkowski, Stanley.

Sixth Row: Privates Molloy, William J.; Nelson, H.M.; Nix, Earl V.; Roerden, Emil H.; Roller, Leslie.

Seventh Row: Privates Rubin, David A.; Schmidt, Edward; Schneider, Samuel; Sheehan, Fred E.; Weaver, P.H.

Eighth Row: Privates West, Thomas C.; Wilson, Doyle F.; Worm, Vergil H.

[118]

[page break]

MEDICAL DETACHMENT
COLORED SECTION

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Corporals Briscoe, F.; Hill, I.V.; Private First Class Allen, L.E.; Barnes, D.; Davis, D.E.

Second Row: Privates First Class Graddick, S.; Honeycutt, L.; Johnson, G.; Johnson, T.; Jones, B.J.

Third Row: Privates First Class Jones, R.J.; Robinson, C.C.; Privates Adams, R.; Bonner, F.; Brooks, H.

Fourth Row: Privates Elliot, H.; Gaines, J.; Hodges, A.H.; Jackson, G.; Jewell, J.

Fifth Row: Privates Lacroix, O.J.; Strickland, G.W.; Worth, F., Jr.

[4 rows of 5 photographs]
[1 row of 3 photographs]

[119]

[page break]

907TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY

[Photograph]
RUSSELL C. BURKHOLDER
First Lieutenant
Commanding

[5 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Master Sergeant Krampitz, Albert J.; Technical Sergeants McCarthy, John A.; Mitchell, James L.; Staff Sergeants Codde, Harry L.; Hurtle, Herman G.; Peterson, Carl E.

Second Row: Staff Sergeant Spann, James L.; Technician Third Grade Thomas, Sidney M.; Sergeants Brown, David W.; Czarkowski, Harry S.; Enger, Arnold J.; Hildebrandt, Arnold L.

Third Row: Sergeants Jockisch, Virgil E.; Lund, O.; Posavac, Martin; Wilson, Philip C.; Technicians Fourth Grade Blackburn, William K.; DeSarro, Edward M.

Fourth Row: Technicians Fourth Grade Goodrum, Roy A.; Henkle, John L.; Werther, Carl A.; Corporals Anderson, Raymond H.; Ferrara, Joseph; Griff, Wilbur L.

Fifth Row: Corporals Warner, William L.; Technicians Fifth Grade Hall, Roy F.; Lane, D.K.; Rhynard, Gerald E.; Salsman, Fred H.; Toomey, Oliver R.

[120]

[page break]

907TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates First Class Allen, John R.; Atkins, James I.; Atristain, Philip; Axton, Delmar B.; Baxter, Chester W.

Second Row: Privates First Class Benjamin Jack; Black, John S.; Bradley, Donald C.; Cosgrove, Lester J.; Dixon, Osborne C.

Third Row: Privates First Class Gerner, Charles A.; Greene, Anderson B.; Hackett, William A.; Hamrick, John W.; Heischober, Harold.

Fourth Row: Privates First Class Houchin, Roy; Martin, Major G.; Meredith, Eugene Q.; Peeler, Harry J.; Phelps, Shirley E.

Fifth Row: Privates First Class Rose, Ruben F.; Rubensohn, Herbert B.; Ruderman, Arthur; Stock, Louis; Tyler, Melvin N.

Sixth Row: Privates First Class Ursitti, Tony G.; Wood, Otha L.; Privates Allen, Claude R.; Andino, Dominic A.; Baker, Francis M.

Seventh Row: Privates Barnwell, Roy C.; Blailock, Westley; Blume, Lonnie W.; Boone, Fowler; Brown, Chester W.

Eighth Row: Privates Donini, Albert; Ewaniuk, William; Gamage, Joe A.; Garlan, Vincent J.; Graham, Arnold C.

Ninth Row: Privates Harrill, Charles G.; Heffernan, Harris F.; Helms, General W.; Jordan, Ealon E.; Staley, Ralph E.

Tenth Row: Privates Verbetic, Stephen; Williams, Fred E.; Wilson, Edgar M.; Wright, Don C.; Wright, Ralph L.

[121]

[page break]

[Photograph]
JACK H. EVANS
Captain
Commanding

PROVISIONAL RECRUIT DETACHMENT

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Technical Sergeant Holcomb, Robert L.; Sergeants Gibson, William W.; Malisbury, Thos.; Montvidas, Peter J.; Corporal Lako, James E.

Second Row: Sergeant Whitcomb, Peter B.; Corporals Roberts, Gerald N.; Privates First Class Eversole, Edwin A.; Israel, William; Private Seymour, Gerald K.

[2 rows of 5 photographs]

[122]

[page break]

[Photograph]
PAUL J. RENGSDORF
Second Lieutenant
Administrative Officer

COMPANY L

[9 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Adolphson, John W.; Altomare, Anthony A.; Beam, Lee H.; Billingsley, George N.; Blachman, Abraham; Bowman, Eugene.

Second Row: Privates Bozza, Peter; Brenelich, Raymond F.; Buskirk, Joseph A.; Damiano, Joseph; Dolan, Francis; Donnelly, Joseph.

Third Row: Privates Donnelly, Lawrence M.; Fabrizio, Patrick; Fountain, Herbert F.; Freese, Harry Charles; Furman, John; Gangloff, Richard B.

Fourth Row: Privates Gervasi, Sebastian J.; Harris, John F.; Havelichek, Andrew R.; Hebberd, William H.; Heiser, Francis J.; Henker, Edward.

Fifth Row: Privates Henry, James E. Jr.; Hensler, Regis J.; Hesko, Zygmund; Hess, Robert K.; Higgins, John V.; Horner, David S.

Sixth Row: Privates Howell, Clarence W.; Hughes, William J.; Lovino, Anthony F.; Javor, John J.; Johnson, Hilmer J.; Johnston, Charles F.

Seventh Row: Privates Jones, Arthur C.; Jones, Carrol F.; Just, Lugi T.; Kahler, Gerald P.; Karis, Edward J.; Keenan, Charles D.

Eighth Row: Privates Kelly, Joseph; Kendzior, William J.; Kenny, William T.; Kent, F.F.; Keough, Bernard M.; Keough, James F.

Ninth Row: Privates Klien, Michael; Kloc, Anthony J.; Kochie, Joseph E.; Kozak, Matthew R.; Kozielski, Constantine J.; Koznarskey, Joseph.

Tenth Row: Privates Krol, Stanley B.; Kudrick, John; Lagocki, Frank L.; Lagocki, Henry M.; Lambie, John H.

[123]

[page break]

COMPANY L

[1 row of 4 photographs]
[6 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]
[1 row of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 4 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates LaRock, Lloyd H.; Lauffer, Alvin K.; Lees, George E.; Leonard, John.

Second Row: Privates Leonard, Michael; Livelsberger, Clair; Lloyd, Raymond C.; Lopeck, Andrew; Love, Ralph; Lozier, Charles M.

Third Row: Privates Lunning, James J.; McAulley, Charles; McCall, Charles M.; McConkey, Bert L.; McCormack, Wilton M.; McDonald, Joseph R.

Fourth Row: Privates McHugh, Edward T.; Mackanin, Joseph; Marn, Edward J.; Marshak, William L.; Masciantonio, John C.; Mason, John F.

Fifth Row: Privates Matchett, William; Mattern, Floyd Jr.; Matthews, Thomas F.; Mendis, Joseph T.; Mildenberger, Edward A.; Miller, Earl K.

Sixth Row: Privates Miller, John J.; Monson, Harry W.; Murawaski, Frank J.; O’Byrne, Francis J.; O’Leary, George J.; Polino, Peter.

Seventh Row: Privates Priest, Donald O.; Ralph, Samuel O.; Reinhardt, William L. Jr.; Rhodes, Brady L.; Rook, Jack J.; Rubbo, Donald.

Eighth Row: Privates Rubenstein, Herbert; Saitta, Joseph L.; Salome, John; Schuchmann, Arthur A.; Scott, Joseph P.

Ninth Row: Privates Sherry, Sol H.; Simpson, William D.; Singleton, William C.; Skinner, Merton F. Jr.; Smith, James J.; Steeves, Kenneth J.

Tenth Row: Privates Uva, Marcello; Wandell, Leo; Whaley, Robert G.; Zottoli, Joseph T.

[124]

[page break]

COMPANY M

[Photograph]
ARTHUR C. SWALLOW
Second Lieutenant
Commanding

[9 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Cacossa, Dominick A.; Carle, Ralph G.; Cole, Geo. W.; Comiskey, John J.; Conley, Sherwood Decker; Coons, Martin.

Second Row: Privates Dobrin, Irving; Heaney, John T.; Hogan, John J.; Hughston, Aubrey L.; Hyland, Norman H.; Jablonski, John M.

Third Row: Privates Kaulback, Aubrey C.; Keegan, Wm. H.; Kenny, John F.; Lamb, Fred E.; Lambert, Jas. V.; Latham, Edw. V.

Fourth Row: Privates Oberlander, Alex; O’Brien, Michael W.; Ockenhouse, Maynard T.; O’Connor, Jas. J.; O’Connor, Stephen J.; Olsen, Alfred.

Fifth Row: Privates Olszewski, Norbert J.; Orpesa, Alfonso E.; Osborne, Richard R.; O’Shea, Jas. F.; Oybkhan, David; Panella, Bernard J.

Sixth Row: Privates Panzarella, Frank; Pascale, Vitto A.R.; Pasko, Frank M.; Patrick, Chas. K.; Peacock, Duane J.; Pearson, Harry.

Seventh Row: Privates Peio, Randolph M.; Penna, Anthony J.; Petronecci, Sammy N.; Phelps, Francis W.; Piekniewski, Jos. R.; Pizonowski, Jacob.

Eighth Row: Privates Pooley, Robert T.; Post, Harold R.; Postorino, Patrick E.; Prenner, Garson; Preston, Lee J.; Pritchard, Arthur.

Ninth Row: Privates Pusterla, John F.; Quintana, Salvador A.; Rabinowicz, Markus; Raftrey, Martin J.; Raichelson, Ralph; Rajk, Frank J. Jr.

[125]

[page break]

COMPANY M

[10 rows of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Privates Ranni, John; Rasczyk, Bennie J.; Rasy, Danny H.; Renz, John W.; Repoli, John A.

Second Row: Privates Resch, Arthur C.; Reznick, Jos. F.; Robertson, Harry W.; Roney, Chos. D.; Rosenbaum, Wm.

Third Row: Privates Rosenblatt, Saul; Rosenblum, Harry; Rossell, Thomas D.; Rothermel, John D.; Rothermel, Woodrow H.

Fourth Row: Privates Rudy, Henry; Ruiz, Frank; Ruminski, Frank; Ruseckras, John B.; Rusin, Walter A.

Fifth Row: Privates Russo, Fortuanto R.; Sabella, Jos.; Sammarco, Mario J.; Say, Benton S.; Schaffer, Jerome R.

Sixth Row: Privates Schmidt, Eugene I.; Schneider, Wm. F.; Schoenfield, Max M.; Schofield, Patrick J.; Schott, Wm. J.

Seventh Row: Privates Schrerber, Louis I.; Schuss, Sydney S.; Seaha, John; Secare, Albert P.; Seitzer, Harold M.

Eighth Row: Privates Senikowich, William; Serling, Jacob; Serrano, Geo.; Shappe, Chas. H.; Shavell, Max; Sherry, Jeremiah T.

Ninth Row: Privates Shoemaker, Benjamin W.; Spaeth, Henry; Stasik, Theodore J.; Stenzler, Isidore, Strati, Gaotano V.

Tenth Row: Privates Sudut, Stanley J.; Sullivan, Daniel H.; Swartz, Walter R.; Tinnel, Ben T.; Wells, Emmett.

[126]

[page break]

27TH AVIATION SQUADRON

[Photograph]
KENETH B. CASSIDY
Captain
Commanding

[4 rows of 6 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: First Sergeant Barnes, Eugene; Sergeants Chandler, John R.; Davis, William R.; Snelling, Luther, Wilkerson, Freddie; Wills, Horace A.

Second Row: Corporal Watkins, Cornelious; Privates First Class Brown, Otis D.; Carter, M.C.; Cooper, Ceasar; Lawrence, Robert J.; Mitchell, Thomas.

Third Row: Privates First Class Morris, John E.; Ross, Wesley; Veal, Harold A.; Williams, Van; Privates Adams, William; Clemont, Herbert L.

Fourth Row: Privates Gilreath, John T.; Lawson, Clarence; Morton, Sanford; Shavers, I.W.; Slay, Woodrow; Spearman, Sayle.

[127]

[page break]

823RD QUARTERMASTER COMPANY

[8 rows of 6 photographs]
[1 row of 5 photographs]

(Reading from Left to Right)

First Row: Sergeants Fitzpatrick, R.; McKinney J.; Morris, R.; Corporals Burst, E.; McDermott, W.; Mitchell, H.

Second Row: Corporals Taylor, A.; Winfrey, P.; Privates First Class Anderson S.; Cumberlander, G.; Hamilton, J.; Jones, J.

Third Row: Privates First Class Pate S.; Thompson, M.; Wood, M.; Privates Baker, Ed R.; Buford, J.; Burney, E.

Fourth Row: Privates Caldwell, M.; Carter, M.H.; Davis, E.; Davis, J.C.; Dillard, W.T.; Ellery, L.B.

Fifth Row: Privates Fountain, O.B.; Freeman, Fred; Gooding, B.; Howard, S.; Kearse, J.; Lewis, E.

Sixth Row: Privates Logan, F.; McCollum, R.; McKinnie, W.; Mills, F.; Mitchell, M.; Phillips, W.T.

Seventh Row: Privates Pryor, T.I.; Ray, J.W.; Robbin, W.; Simon, J.; Spicer, G.T.; Smith, L.S.

Eighth Row: Privates Smith, J.; Smith, W.; Spain, J.; Staples, E.T.; Taylor, Alex; Thompson, F.

Ninth Row: Privates Thomas J.; Tyler, S.; Upchurch, J.; Wilson, G.; Young, P.

[128]

PUBLISHED 1942 BY
ARMY AND NAVY PUBLISHING CO., INC.
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA

[page break]

CAPTAIN CHARLES D. BAYLIS, USMC (RET)
Editor-in-Chief and Director of Field Operations

[page break]

[Embossed crest]

Citation

Army Air Forces, “Cochran Field,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed November 29, 2022, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/34136.

Item Relations

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