Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. One

STyrieJSB87636v1.1.pdf

Title

Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. One

Description

A wartime log kept by Jim Tyrie whilst being kept a prisoner of war. He was shot down on 10th April 1941 and imprisoned for 4 years, 1 month and 16 days. It contains cartoons, sketches and maps.
He lists the men who were shot after recapture during the Great Escape.
Included are poems and parodies, a list of their daily rations, an account of the Mass Escape, recipes and small strips of Window dropped by the RAF.

Creator

Publisher

IBCC Digital Archive

Contributor

Tricia Marshall
David Bloomfield

Rights

This content is available under a CC BY-NC 4.0 International license (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0). It has been published ‘as is’ and may contain inaccuracies or culturally inappropriate references that do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the University of Lincoln or the International Bomber Command Centre. For more information, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ and https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/legal.

Format

One handwritten book.

Language

Identifier

STyrieJSB87636v1

Temporal Coverage

Transcription

[lion crest]

A WARTIME LOG

[page break]

WAR PRISONERS AID

AIDE AUX PRISONNIERS DE GUERRE

KRIEGSGEFANGENENHILFE

WORLD’S ALLIANCE OF YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS

ALLIANCE UNIVERSELLE DES UNIONS CHRETIENNES DE JEUNES GENS

WELTBUND DER CHRISTLICHEN VEREINE JUNGER MANNER

Quai Wilson, 37

GENEVE (Suisse)

Centre International

Address Telegraph: FLEMGO-GENEVE

Compte de Cheques postaux: 1. 331

Telephone 2.70.60

Dear Friend,

After the Canadian and American editions of the War-time Log, here is a special issue for British prisoners of war. Though its format is somewhat different, its purpose is just the same as the others: to bring you greetings from friends and to facilitate your recording some of your experiences during these eventful years.

Not everyone will want to use this book as a diary. If you are a writer, here is space for a short story. If you are an artist, you may want to cover these pages with sketches of your camp, caricatures of its important personalities. If you are a poet, major or minor, confide your lyrics to these pages. If you feel that circumstances cramp your style in correspondence, you may write here letters to be carried with you on your return. This book may serve to list the most striking concoctions of the camp kitchen, the records of camp sports or a selection of the best jokes cracked in camp. One man has suggested using the autograph of one of his companions (plus his fingerprints?) to head each page, followed by free and frank remarks about the man himself. You may write a commentary on such photographs as you may have to mount on the special pages for that purpose with the mounting-corners in the pocket of the back cover. This pocket may be used for clippings you want to preserve, or, together with the small envelopes on the last page, for authentic souvenirs of life in camp.

Your own ingenuity may suggest to you many other ways of using this book, which comes to you with our greetings and good wishes.

Yours very sincerely,

WAR PRISONERS’ AID OF THE YMCA.

[page break]

Received August 2nd. 1944.

[underlined] Bk4R6 [/underlined]

AIR MINISTRY [deleted] August [/deleted] [inserted] 16th September [/inserted] 1943

THIS IS TO CERTIFY that 8736 F/O. J. S. B. Tyrie R.A.F. born on 18th October, 1919 at present a prisoner of war in Stalag Luft III and whose prisoner of war number is 530 has been promoted to Flight Lieutenant with effect from 19th October 1942 and the requisite notification has been published.

[signature] GROUP CAPTAIN

P. 358254 Director of Personal Services.

Asst. Secretary.

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

A WARTIME LOG FOR BRITISH PRISONERS

Gift from

THE WAR PRISONERS’ AID OF THE Y.M.C.A.

37 Quai Wilson

GENEVA – SWITZERLAND

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[lion crest]

THIS BOOK BELONGS TO

JAMES S. B. TYRIE

F/L. R.A.F.V.R.

STALAG LUFT 3.

P.O.W. NO. 530

[YMCA crest]

[page break]

WE ARRIVE AT BARTH. 17-4-41[underlined] BACK ROW [/underlined] PALMER, S/L TORRENS, RUSSELL, SELF, RITCHIE, WILSON, LONG, MORGAN,

[underlined] FRONT [/underlined] SHORE, GOODWIN.

SHORE. ESCAPED, HOME, JUNE 1941

LONG. SHOT ON BREAK, APRIL 1944.

[page break]

[lion crest] 1 [lion crest]

10-4-41

“FOR YOU THE WAR IS OVER”

11-4-41 – 15-4-41

DULAG LUFT = FRANKFURT

17-4-41 – 9-4-42

STALAG LUFT 1 = BARTH

11-4-42 – 30-3-43

STALAG LUFT 3 (EAST CAMP) = SAGAN

30-3-43 – 29-2-44

STALAG LUFT 3 (NORTH CAMP) = SAGAN

29-2-44 – 28-1-45

STALAG LUFT 3 (BELARIA) = SAGAN

28-1-45 TO 4-2-45 BY SLEDGE, FOOT & CATTLE TRUCK VIA KUNAU, GROSS SELTEN, BIRKENSTEDT, GRAUSTEIN SPREMBERG TO STALAG 3A, LUCKENWALDE.

4-2-45 12-4-45

STALAG 3A (LUCKENWALDE) – [symbol]

12-4-45 = 14-4-45 IN CATTLE TRUCKS IN LUCKENWALDE GOODS STATION (INTENDED DEST. ST. 7A MOOSEBERG, NR MUNICH)

14-4-45 STALAG 3A (LUCKENWALDE) =

P.T.O.

[page break]

2

21-4-45 GERMANS EVACUATE CAMP.

22.4.45 (0603 HRS) RUSSIAN TANKS AND MOTORIZED INFANTRY ARRIVE.

20.5.45 PROCEED BY RUSSIAN TRANSORT [sic] TO ELBE, WHERE WE ARE MET BY AMERICAN TRUCKS AND GO TO HALLE, ARRIVING 10 P.M.

25.5.45 BY AIR IN DC3’s TO NIVELLES (BRUSSELS), ARRIVING 2 PM. BY LORRY TO BRUSSELS

26.5.45 BY LORRY TO SCHRACHT. BY AIR IN LANC TO DUNSFORD. BY TRAIN TO COSFORD (106 PRC).

27.5.45 BY TRAIN TO DUNDEE

10.4.41 TO 26.5.45

4 YEARS 1 MONTH 16 DAYS

[page break]

[drawing of two-headed man]

[signature]

RUMOUR.

[page break]

4

[blank page]

[page break]

5

Extract from the “Wire” Xmas 1941, Barth.

Damn it – you cant eat harps!

[drawing of airman on road to clouds]

[underlined] JST. [/underlined]

4.8.44

[page break]

6

[blank page]

[page break]

7

EAST CAMP DRs. MATTHEWS

NORTH CAMP – MONTEUIS & HUTT

BELARIA – MONTENUIS

LUCKENWALDE – MONTENUIS & STEWART

WIPE YOUR BOOTS

[drawing of caricature man holding large syringe]

[page break]

8

[blank page]

[page break]

9

[drawing of a Lancaster flying above clouds inside a circle]

[symbol] (said about June 44)

Very best wishes Jimmy & may it be less than 18 months!!

[signature]

AUG/44.

[page break]

10

[blank page]

[page break]

11

[SS badge]

[page break]

12

[drawing of caricature man with parachute on back going through door marked MANAGER]

With apologies to Fargasse and Leslie Irvin.

[page break]

13

[drawing of man and woman at dinner table, man is sitting, women is leaning over him]

[underlined] HOME TO REALITY

“WHAT! – PRUNES?” [/underlined]

[page break]

14

[blank page]

[page break]

15

[drawing of Percy Prune in flying gear in the forefront and a crashed aircraft in the background]

[page break]

16

[blank page]

[page break]

17

[drawing of map depicting where aircraft shot down and showing the area around Stalag Luft 3 and Stalag Luft 1]

[page break]

18

[blank page]

[page break]

19.

[drawing of nude woman paddling with man in background watching]

A kriegis “Mid Summer Night Dream”.

[signature]

Aug. 44

[page break]

20

[blank page]

[page break]

21

[drawing of view of camp from a window]

[signature]

[underlined] BELARIA [/underlined] 15/8/44

[page break]

22

[blank page]

[page break]

23

[colour drawing of ruins in the foreground and trees in the background]

[signature]

BELARIA.

[page break]

24

[underlined] Sagan. [/underlined]

“Enemy forces managed to gain possession of the town of Sagan”

[underlined] O.K.W. Communique 18-2-45 [/underlined]

[page break]

25

[crest of Sagan]

[signature]

4/10/44

[page break]

26

[blank page]

[page break]

27

[drawing of plan of prisoners’ camp]

Not to scale.

16-8-44

DURING AN AIR RAID

[underlined] SPORTS FIELD [/underlined]

[page break]

28

[plan drawing]

[page break]

29

[plan of German camp]

GERMAN CAMP

[page break]

30

[blank page]

[page break]

31

[cartoon drawing of 3 men sitting at table in Censor Department]

[underlined] “THIS ONE SAYS IT WON’T BE LONG NOW!”

[page break]

32

[blank page]

[page break]

33

[drawing of a Polish pilot's wings]

With best wishes from F/L DAAB Merryshaw.

Sagan-Belaria – 27-3-44.

[page break]

34

[blank page]

[page break]

35

[drawing of thatched houses with a bike rider on the road]

Cropthorne – A Worcestershire Village.

Best of Luck, Jimmy!

[signature]

10/44

[page break]

36

[blank page]

[page break]

37

25-8-44

[signature]

[drawing of airmen in messy room]

[page break]

38

[Kreigsgefangen Lagergeld]

[page break]

39

[blank page]

[page break]

40

[blank page]

[page break]

41

[drawing of map of Norway]

NORGE

Best wishes from [signature]

PILESTREDET 96

OSLO.

NORWAY.

[page break]

42

[blank page]

[page break]

43

[drawing of sentry in sentry box behind barbed wire]

To remind you, Jim, Bill Houghton Sept 44 Belaria

Copy

[page break]

46

THERE ARE NO RACKETS

[drawing of men playing badminton]

“NO – THEY MUST GO – I WONT HAVE THEM IN THE CAMP – NOT EVEN THAT KIND – THEY’RE MY ORDERS “I QUITE AGREE SIR”

[page break]

47

[drawing of two men marching, one in uniform the other in sports kit]

[page break]

48

[blank page]

[page break]

49

[drawing of two men, one a padre in front of a hut with door marked COMMUNISM]

“But I’m [underlined] no verrai religous [sic] Padre [/underlined]”

All the best

[signature]

[page break]

50

[blank page]

[page break]

[German leaflet]

[page break]

[permit stamp]

[three censor stamps]

[page break]

- AND WE, TO THE LAST ENGLISHMAN"

[cartoon drawing]

1944

“Und wir bis zum letslen Englander!!”

[page break]

[cartoon drawing]

[page break]

Ex. [underlined] Das Reich [/underlined].

[underlined] Archbishops in Action. [/underlined]

“We’ve blessed the bombs for the continent, now let’s dash off and do a prayer of protest against V1.”

[page break]

Englands Prestigekurve

[cartoon drawing of Winston Churchill]

Churchill flog von Athen nach London zuruck – (in homen Bogen)

CHURCHILL FLEW BACK FROM ATHENS TO LONDON (IN A BIG ARC) THE HIGH JUMP!

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[German leaflet]

[page break]

GOSSIP BRINGS BOMBS. SILENCE! AND WARN EVERYONE, WHO STILL GOSSIPS – PST.

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[pencil drawing of a woman’s face]

All the best Jimmy

Bob Hamilton

Stalag Luft III 1944.

[page break]

[drawing of three aircraft flying over the Polish flag]

BELARIA 17.IX.1944.

29. JUN. 1942 Saarbrucken.

F/LT. ALEXANDRAWICE H. HILMS

18.4.48 TUNIS

F/LT WYSZKOWSKI M.

TORUN

WARSAW, Air Ministry

F/Lt. DAAB [symbol]

F/O MORSKI B. Hilno

15.VI.1944 Holland

[page break]

[drawing of a Whitley]

[signature] 3/1/45

[page break]

[drawing of men in various forms of dress standing on parade.

APPEL.

EAMES

BELARIA ‘44

[page break]

[German film ticket]

[page break]

[drawing of a totem pole]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

55

[underlined] In Memoriam. [/underlined]

To those officers who were killed after escaping from the North Camp on March 10th 1944.

[underlined] British [/underlined]

F/L BRETTEL

F/O BULL

S/L BUSHELL

F/L CASEY

P/O COCHRAN

S/L CROSS

P/O EVANS

P/O GRISMAN

- GUNN

- HALL

F/L HAYTER

P/O HUMPHREYS

- KIDDER

S/L KIRBY – GREEN

F/L LANGFORD

P/O LONG

P/O LEIGH

F/O MILFORD

F/L SWAIN

P/O STEWART

F/O STOWER

- STREET

- WALENN

- WILEY

P/O WILLIAMS.

[underlined] Polish [/underlined]

F/L CROLL

- KIEWNARSKI

- KOLANOWSKI

- MONDSCHEIN

- PAWLUK

- SKATZINKAS

- TOBOLSKI

[underlined] Canadian [/underlined]

F/L BIRKLAND

- McGILL

- WERNHAM

[underlined] Australian [/underlined]

S/L CATANACH

F/O HAKE

F/O KIERATH

S/L WILLIAMS

[underlined] Belgian [/underlined]

F/O PICARD

[underlined] Norwegian [/underlined]

LT. FUGLESANG

- ESPELID

[underlined] South African [/underlined]

LT. GOUWS

- McGARR

- STEVENS

[underlined] New Zealand [/underlined]

P/O CHRISTENSEN

F/O POHE

[underlined] French [/underlined]

P/O SCHEIDHAUER

[underlined] Czech [/underlined]

F/L VALENTA

[underlined] Lithuanian [/underlined]

F/L MARCINKUS

[page break]

56

I have confiscated from F./Lt. Tyrie 1 teep ot wich is belong to us

[signature]

I have confiscated from F/L Tyrie 1 teapot which is belong to us.

[signature]

[page break]

57

[underlined] Retrospect. Xmas ’41 [/underlined]

Flashback to January shows about 140 officers & 400 men facing the worst half of a Pomeranian winter. They are not without hope (or beer.)

In Feb, Fort Henry (Canada) in the news. S/L Paddon heads purge of 50 officers to Polish fortress at Thorn.

Parcels & cigs. beginning to arrive with some regularity, and with pleasantly full stomaches [sic] we watch our rapid advance in Lybia. With a Medical Comfort’s parcel we watched our even more rapid retreat.

About this time the Commandant, Maj. Oertal, was promoted to Oberstleutnant & posted. Succeeded by Maj. von Stachelsky, shortly also posted. In the matter of Commandants we were winning 2 – 1.

The Germans pour thro’ Yugoslavia to engage us in Greece. In June we lost Crete, but won W/C Day.

[page break]

58

He was accompanied by 17 other escapees from Dulag – & Major Dodge.

The summer passes quietly on Flieger Beer, with spasmodic activity in Lybia, heavy battles on the East Front, air attacks in the West, & the loss of S/L Lockett’s trousers in the North. In August a further purge emigrated in the direction of Lubeck, - in exchange we received one Padre.

In September began the Reign of Terror, & the men’s Dining room made Rajah Dowlah seem an incompetent lyro. In October the terror spent itself, but the memory lingers on. November saw the fast of news broken by the arrival of 40 new officers.

December – Germany storms the gates of Moscow – Russia fights on. We force the pace in Lybia – Gondar falls, & Mussolini mourns another desert - - - - -

- - - Roll on 1942.

[page break]

59

[underlined] THE DAILY BASH [/underlined]

[underlined] BREAKFAST 9 – 10 AM. [/underlined]

2 slices bread

spread

Tea

[underlined] LUNCH 12.30 pm. [/underlined]

1 slice bread

spread

cocoa

[underlined] TEA 4 PM. [/underlined]

2 slices bread (toasted)

spread

Tea

[underlined] DINNER 8 pm [/underlined]

3 – 4 oz. tinned meat

Potatoes & Veg.

Sweet

cocoa & cigs.

[underlined] Above for full parcels: [/underlined]

Supplies of Veg. very variable in quantity, tho monotonous

See p 73.

[page break]

60

[German newspaper cutting about Winston Churchill]

[page break]

61

[underlined] BOMBER COMMAND [/underlined]

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN

IT’S CLEAR TONIGHT AND THEY’RE FLYING HIGH

HUNDREDS OF THEM AND THOUSANDS PERHAPS

RIDING THE MOONLIGHT SKY

MEN, MACHINERY, BOMBS AND MAPS

COFFEE, SANDWICHES AND FLEECE-LINED BOOTS.

BONES AND MUSCLES, MINDS AND HEARTS

DEEP IN THE EARTH THEY HAVE LEFT BEHIND

LIE IN THE DARK AND LET THEM GO

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN.

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN

THEY’RE GOING OVER IN WAVES AND WAVES

HIGH ABOVE VILLAGES HILLS AND STREAMS

COUNTRY CHURCHES AND LITTLE GRAVES

AND LITTLE CITIZENS WORRIED DREAMS.

VERY SOON THEY’LL HAVE REACHED THE SEA

AND FAR BELOW THEM WILL LIE THE BAYS

AND CLIFFS AND SANDS WHERE THEY USED TO BE

TAKEN FOR SUMMER HOLIDAYS

LIE IN THE DARK AND LET THEM GO

THEIR’S IS A WORLD WE’LL NEVER KNOW

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN

CITY MAGNATES AND STEEL CONTRACTORS

FACTORY WORKERS AND POLITICIANS

SOFT, HYSTERICAL LITTLE ACTORS

BALLET DANCERS, RESERVED MJUSICIANS

SAFE IN WARM CIVILIAN BEDS

COUNT YOUR PROFITS AND COUNT YOUR SHEEP

LIFE IS PASSING ABOVE YOUR HEADS

JUST TURN OVER AND TRY TO SLEEP

LIE IN THE DARK AND LET THEM GO

THEIR’S IS A DEBT YOU’LL FOREVER OWE

LIE IN THE DARK AND LISTEN

[underlined] NOEL COWARD [/underlined]

[page break]

62

A selection of names used to describe various goons:-

Adolf

Flannelfoot

The Red Indian

Smiler

Rubberneck

Dim wits

The Dumb Hauptman

Tweedledum and Tweedledee

Babyface

Useless Eustace

The limping goon

Charlie

Bishop of Barth

Photo goon

Cookhouse goon

Cornerbox goon

Dopey

Slim

Mexican Pete

Taxi Joe

Bulk Issue

Slimey

Goon that barks like a dog

The Hundfuhrer

Appell goon

Death Warmed Up.

[page break]

63

[cartoon drawing]

Extract from Stratsunder Lachtrichten circa, November 1941

To celebrate [underlined] “Pearl Harbour” [/underlined]

[page break]

64

[underlined] THERE’S ALWAYS BLOODY SOMETHING [/underlined]

[underlined] A BLOODY GOOD DESCRIPTION OF LIFE IN ST. LUFT 3 [/underlined]

BLOODY TIMES IS BLOODY HARD

BLOODY WIRE FOR BLOODY GUARD

BLOODY DOG IN BLOODY YARD

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY TEA IS BLOODY VILE

BLOODY COCOA MAKE YOU SMILE

COCOA MADE IN BLOODY STYLE

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY ICE-RINK, BLOODY MUD

BLOODY SKATES NO BLOODY GOOD

SAT WHERE ONCE I BLOODY STOOD

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY SALMON’S BLOODY QUEER

LOOKS AT YOU WITH BLOODY LEER

IS IT GOOD? NO BLOODY FEAR

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY BRIDGE ALL BLOODY DAY

LEARNING HOW TO BLOODY PLAY

BLOODY BLACKWOODS BLOODY WAY

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

[page break]

65

NOW AND THEN – THO BLOODY STALE –

CENSOR HANDS OUT BLOODY MAIL

BETTER DRAW THE BLOODY VEIL

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY GIRL FRIEND DROPS ME FLAT

LIKE A DOG ON BLOODY MAT

GETS A YANK LIKE BLOODY THAT

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

BLOODY SAWDUST IN THE BREAD

MUST HAVE COME FROM BLOODY BED

BETTER ALL BE BLOODY DEAD

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

DON’T IT GET YOUR BLOODY GOAT

WAS IT SHAW WHO BLOODY WROTE

“WHERE THE HELL’S THAT BLOODY BOAT?”

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

NOW I’VE REACHED THE BLOODY END

NEARLY ROUND THE BLOODY BEND

THAT’S THE GENERAL BLOODY TREND

BLOODY – BLOODY – BLOODY

[underlined] GEE – I’M BLOODY BRASSED [/underlined]

[page break]

66

[underlined] FOODACCO (NO RACKETS) [/underlined]

Foodacco is run on a Camp basis, and is simply a mart where P.O.Ws are able to exchange surplus articles such as clothing toothpaste etc, for others of which they have more need; chocolate for cigarettes and tobacco, and finally and most important of all, food from Red Cross parcels.

It is obvious that food and other articles have an entirely different value here in P.O.W. camps than at home, so a point value is given to each commodity, according to its supply and demand.

The following lists contain some of the more important Articles and their prices.

[underlined] CIGARETTES [/underlined]

GRADE I 60 PER 100

GRADE II 35 “

GRADE III 20 “

AM. GR. I 50 “

“ GR II 20 “

[underlined] TOBACCO [/underlined]

GRADE I 65 PER 4 OZS

GRADE II 45 “

GRADE III 15 “

TOOTHPASTE TOOTHBRUSH [brackets] 50 PTS

SHIRT + COLLAR 300 “

PYJAMAS 300 “

PANTS + VEST (SHT) 250 “

[page break]

67

[underlined] – MEATS:– [/underlined]

SPAM, PREM, ETC 90 PTS

YORK ROLL 85 “

BULLY BEEF 85 “

MEAT ROLL (ENG) 55 “

STEWS (ENG) 60 “

SAUSAGE (ENG) 55 “

“ (ARG) 120 “

BACON (ENG) 60 “

[underlined] FISH:- [/underlined]

SALMON 35 PTS

HERRINGS PILCHARDS [brackets] 35 “

SARDINES 15 “

[underlined] BREWS: [/underlined]

TEA (2 oz) 70 PTS

COFFEE (CAN GRD) 60 “

COFFEE (TIN PWDR) 60 “

COCOA 70 “

ORANGE JUICE 20 “

[underlined] SPREADS [/underlined]

JAM (16 oz) 80 PTS

“ (12 oz) 65 “

“ (10 oz) 55”

“ (6 oz) 30 “

SYRUP. 40 “

BUTTER 75 “

MARG (16 oz) 40 “

MEAT PASTE 15 “

[underlined] CHEESE [/underlined]

AM. (8oz) 45 “

ENG. (3 oz) 15 “

CAN (4 oz) 15 ”

N. Z. (16 oz) 80 “

[underlined] MISC. [/underlined]

OATS (SMALL) 50 PTS

“ (LARGE) 60 “

SUGAR PR LB 120 “

EGG FLAKES 40 “

SWEETS 10 “

MATCHES 20 “

[underlined] MILK:- [/underlined]

KLIM 100 PTS

OTHER PDWR MK. 80 “

CONDENSED 70 “

[underlined] BISCUITS [/underlined]

CANADIAN 60 PTS

ENGLISH SERVICE 55 “

ARGENTINE 60 “

AMERICAN 25 “

[underlined] FRUIT [/underlined]

RAISINS. (LARGE) 70 “

“ (SMALL) 35 “

PRUNES (LARGE) 30 “

“ (SMALL) 15 “

PEACHES (DRIED) APRICOTS “ DATES, FIGS [brackets] 40 “

[underlined] CHOCOLATE [/underlined]

PLAIN PER LB 160 “

MILK “ “ 200 “

D. BARS EACH 40 “

Hope these prices may always remind you Jimmy of Harry – G. Goodwin CHIEF [deleted] RACKETEER [/deleted] MANAGER

[page break]

68

At Luckenwalde, things were somewhat different. During the 6 weeks without any parcels, cigs. became extremely valuable. Trading took place with Army NCO’s etc. in neighbouring compound, also with hospital etc. Later also with Norwegian Compound. A camp Foodacco was then opened, dealing with Norwegian food separately, for which a %tage [sic] of coffee or choc. was necessary to make a purchase. The points system was used, one point being equal to a cigarrette. [sic]

[page break]

69

[underlined] Parody:- With Apologies To Jerome Keru. [/underlined]

They asked me how I knew, I’d been at the brew

I of course replied, something here inside

Tells me that I’m fried.

They said someday you’ll find,

All who drink go blind.

A presence in your head, will materialize

When the sun doth rise!

So I roar

With glee, and go for more,

To think they could doubt my capacity

Yet with the dawn, my skittishness is gone

I am without my vivacity!

Now laughing friends cry “Ho”!

You know we told you so

So I growld [sic] and say

“Go to Hell”!

And them,

Woof my lunch again.

In memory of “Kriegie Brews”! May we have some of the better variety together in the future.

[signature]

22-9-‘44

[page break]

70

[underlined] KRIEGIE SLANG [/underlined]

ABORT. Lavatory.

APPELL Roll call, held at least twice daily

BASH To eat – usually more than customary amount

BEND, ROUND THE: Mad, insane

BITCHING Complaining

BODS Group of individuals

BREW Drink – any type

CIRCUIT Internal perimeter of camp

COOLER. (GAOL) Bleak confinement for escape etc.

DHOBIE. Accumulation of unclean laundry

DUFF GEN. Highly inaccurate information

FERRET Ante-escape goon, working inside camp

FOODACCO Exchange of food, tobacco etc. on points system

GASH. Surplus, usually of food.

GLOP Pudding, goon or otherwise

GOON A German, or anything german.

GRIFF Information, usually reliable

KRIEGIE. Prisoner of War.

- Do – BREW. Alcoholic brew, made of raisins, prunes etc.

NEW PURGE. Influx of new kriegies

PIT . . Kriegie’s bed. (pit bashing – excessive use of)

PRANGER. Anything usuable [sic] as a hammer

RACKETS Double dealing in anything at all

STOOGE. Person on room duties – cook, washing up etc.

WIRE JOB Cutting way thro’ wire at night

GODBOTHERER. One with strong religious beliefs.

POPE. The R.C. padre.

[page break]

71

[underlined] IS IT AFFECTATION [/underlined]

WHEN FIRST WE JOINED THE AIR FORCE, WE THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BETTER

TO INCLUDE A LITTLE SERVICE SLANG, IN MOTHER’S WEEKLY LETTER.

AND SO SHE LEARNED THAT WE WERE CHEESED, BRASSED OFF WITH BEING SPROGS,

WE DIDN’T LIKE THE BULL AT ALL, WE’D CLEANED TOO MANY BOGS.

WHEN HOME ON LEAVE WE’D TREAT THE GIRL TO CHAR & P’RAPS A WAD

AND SPEAK ABOUT HER FATHER, AS A PRETTY CLUELESS BOD

WHILE HER BROTHER IN THE ARMY – A BROWN JOB – HAD NO HOPE

HE SIMPLY HAD’NT [sic] GOT THE GRIEF, THE PONGO COULD’NT [sic] COPE.

OUR FLYING WAS A PIECE OF CAKE, THE ODD PRANG NOW & THEN

BUT USUALLY WE’D STOOGE AROUND, WE REALLY HAD THE GEN

WE’D BLAST THE GOON, DEFY THE FLAK, PRESS ON THRO’ ICE & SNOW

AND SOMETIMES WE’D COLLECT A GONG – BANG ON, OH WIZARD SHOW.

THEN CAME THE NIGHT OF GROUP’S BIG BOOB – SOME TYPE WAS NOT ON TOP

“ACHTUNG”, YOU SHALL EIN BURTON HAVE, I GIVE YOU ZE CHOP

OF WHICH WE TOOK A VERY DIM, WHEN DAWNED THE REALIZATION

WE’D HAVE TO LEARN SOME BRAND NEW SLANG – OR IS IT AFFECTATION.

SO NOW WE’RE KRIEGIES, DRINKING BREW, INSTEAD OF DEAR OLD CHAR

WE THRIVE ON GASH, ON CORNED BEEF HASH, & MORTGAGE OUR D-BAR

WE GIVE GOONS HELL WHEN ON APPELL, WE PITBASH, DAY & NIGHT

WE’RE ROUND THE BEND, BUT PRAISE NO END, OUR EFFORTS AT ARBEIT.

SO MOTHER DEAR, DON’T THINK US QUEER, JUST BLAME IT ON THE GOONS

IF YOU AT NIGHT AWAKE WITH FRIGHT TO HEAR “BOWLS UP FOR PRUNES”

WE REALLY ARE QUITE HARMLESS & STILL ARE FAIRLY YOUNG

SE WE’LL SETTLE DOWN WHEN WE GET HOME, TO LEARN OUR MOTHER TONGUE.

[page break]

72

[blank page]

[page break]

73

Rations from Germans at Luckenwalde consisted of a daily issue of 300 gms bread & 1/2 litre (approx 1 cup full) of very liquid soup. Each day a “spread” was issued, nearly always marg. 25 gms (about 1/2 match box) Very occasional issue of meat paste, sausage & fat. Every third day an issue of sugar, about 2 tablespoons each.

[page break]

74

[drawing of two men carrying plates walking in opposite directions through a door]

[underlined] ILS NE PASSERONT PAS! [/underlined]

[page break]

75

[blank page]

[page break]

76

[blank page]

[page break]

77

[underlined] Gimme the Gen! [/underlined]

“Hello! Let me carry your things for you”

“Thanks very much – what sort of camp is this?

“Oh – not bad, you know – but not a patch on Dulag. Have you been down long?

“Well, about 3 weeks or so: doesn’t sound long to you, I suppose”

“I’ll say. But that’s all the better: you must come & give us the good news”

“News?”

“Yes: everything thats [sic] going on in England. This is our room. Pretty untidy, I’m afraid. Now will you have some tea? And something to eat? I suppose you ran out of food on the way, as usual”

“Yes: how did you know that? Oh, thanks! Bread & cheese will do fine.”

[page break]

78

“Now tell me – what’s the spirit at home? Pretty good?

“Yes – I think it seemed alright.

“And how are our fighters doing over the channel? Are we shooting them down OK?

“Well, I don’t know really – was up North all the time.

“Tell me. What do the papers say about the Russian Front? Are the Germans having pretty heavy losses?

“Well, the papers say so.

“What sort of figure?

“I’m afraid I can’t remember. 1 – 4,000,000 I believe.

“Oh! Now what are the Americans doing? I believe Roosevelt’s got the Neutral Act repealed, hasn’t he?

“Yes, I believe I did read something about that – but I’ve rather forgotten now. Never read the papers much.

“Did you ever see the official reports about the sinking of submarines?

[page break]

79

“No”

“Oh, well! do you know anything about the Near East? Are there any rumours about an offensive in Lybia?

“I heard someone talking on the wireless once – don’t know who it was, though. I think he said we might make a push if we got enough troops there in time.

“Have you any idea what forces we’ve got out there?

“No, I’m afraid I haven’t.

“Did you ever hear anything of the F.A.A.?

“No, I’m afraid not.

“Were you on one of our new bombers?

“No”

“Have you ever seen a Stirling?

“Only in the distance, I’m afraid.

“Are they raiding England much now?

“I believe they are, occasionally.

[page break]

80

‘What size bombs are we dropping now?

‘I’m not sure, really: I’m an A.G.

‘What’s Jane doing now, do you know?

‘Jane?

‘Yes, Jane – in the Daily Mirror

‘Oh, I don’t know – never read the thing.

“Where were you on when you were shot down?

“Oh, well – I’m not sure – it was all in the darkness, you know.”

[symbol]

[page break]

81

[underlined] Report from Germany on Mass Escape. [/underlined]

In March of this year, English P.ows [sic] in considerable numbers broke out of various camps in Germany. Measures for bringing the fugitives in again were a complete success. In the course of these measures it was proved that a concerted action which had been partially prepared with help from abroad, was frustrated. While bringing in the Pows [sic] who had escaped from one camp, the German Police forces were forced to use their fire arms on various occasions, owing to resistance being offered and flight attempted. As a result, a no. of the prisoners lost their lives.

The Reich Govt. informed the British Govt. of these occurrences via Switzerland. Beyond this, it also held out the prospect of a final definite report, after the searches had been concluded. In the meanwhile, Eden, in the House of Commons, did not shrink from making the monstrous assertion that the British P.ow’s [sic] were murdered in Germany.

[page break]

82

In a communication which was made to the British, this unqualified censure is repudiated. The note runs as follows.

“On the 23rd. June, the English Foreign Minister, without waiting for the results of German inquiries, made a declaration in this matter, which the Reich energetically repudiates. The F.M. of a country, which began the bombing war, against the civilian population, which has murdered 10,000’s of women & children by terror attacks on dwelling places, hospitals & cultural monuments, which in an official “Handbook of Modern Irregular Warfare”, written for Forces, has given all English soldiers the literal command to apply the methods of gangsters to gouge out the eyes of an enemy who lies defenceless on the ground, and to smash in his skull with stones - - -

[page break]

83

such a Foreign Minister must be deprived of the right to have any part in the question at all, or indeed to make any accusations of any kind. In face of the unheard off [sic] conduct of the English Foreign Minister, the Reich Govt. declines to give further information re this affair.

Ex. Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung.

[page break]

84

[blank page]

[page break]

85

[underlined] Heard after lights out. [/underlined]

- - - They can’t afford not to do it, with the reserves they haven’t got - - -

[underlined] Luckenwalde. [/underlined]

Continual coughing – and many air-raid warnings.

[page break]

86

[underlined] NORWEGIAN COMPOUND V. BRITISH COMPOUND. [/underlined]

V. LT. ENDERSEN

SELF. WHITE

[list of moves on a chess board]

[indecipherable address]

After 2 hrs play, white had an advantage of a rook & 3 pawns and was judged by committee to be winner, black agreeing. The match was lost 9 1/2 – 2 1/2.

A delightful lunch followed the match, as per menu opposite.

[page break]

87

[drawing of six flags]

[underlined] Luncheon [/underlined]

given by

The Norwegian Officers

at

The Great International Chess Tournament

in

Luckenwalde 28/3 1945

[drawing of a flower]

Flight Lieutenant Jamas [sic] Tyrie

[page break]

88

[blank page]

[page break]

89

[underlined] – ESCAPE – [/underlined]

If you can quit the compound undetected

And clear your tracks, nor leave the smallest trace

And follow out the programme you’ve selected

Nor lose your grasp of distance, time & space . . .

If you can walk at night by compass bearing

Or ride the railways in the light of day

And temper your elusiveness with daring

Trusting that sometimes bluff will find a way . . .

If you can swallow sudden, sour frustration

And gaze unmoved at failure’s ugly shape,

Remembering, as further inspiration

It was, and is, your duty to escape . . .

If you can keep the great Gestapo guessing

With explanations only partly true

And leave them, in their heart of hearts, confessing

They didn’t get the whole truth out of you. - - -

[page break]

90

If you can use your “cooler” fortnight dearly

For planning methods wiser than before,

And treat your first miscalculations merely

As lists let fall by fate to teach you more . . .

If you can scheme on with patience & precision

It wasn’t in a day they builded Rome

And make ‘escape’ your single, sole ambition

The next time you attempt it, you’ll get home.

F/L [underlined] E. Gordon Brettel. [/underlined]

(written in April 1943 in the “cooler” at Gross Hartmansdorf, Saxony. Brettel was among the victims of the big escape from the North Camp, Stalag Luft 3, in April 1944.)

[page break]

91

[underlined] WEEKLY RATIONS PER MAN, AS ISSUED [/underlined]

2 oz. Sugar

2 oz. Jam

1 Loaf Black Bread (2000 grms.)

4 oz. Marg.

6 lbs. Potatoes (Variable)

3 oz. Dry Barley

2 oz. Cheese (Ersatz 50% inedible)

2 oz. Blood Sausage

2 oz. Fresh meat

3 oz. Ersatz tea or coffee (not used)

Dry or Fresh Vegetable when available.

[underlined] GENEVA CONVENTION. CH. 2 ART. 2. [/underlined]

THE FOOD RATION OF P.O.W’s. SHALL BE EQUAL IN [underlined] QUALITY [/underlined] AND [underlined] QUANTITY [/underlined] TO THAT OF DEPOT TROOPS.

[page break]

92

People I lived with.

R3W. – R28 C

[underlined] Barth. Ritchie (S) – Ritchie (S)

Russell (E) – Patterson (S)

Self – Middleton (E)

[blank] – Self

68/8 – 64/4

[underlined] SAGAN. [/underlined]

E.

Stapleton (E) – Anthony (C)

Patterson (S) – Kingswell (C) (Davies (E)

Page (E) – Dougall (C) Small (S.A.)

Middleton (E) – Hannigan (E) Read ) (E)

Lythgoe (E) – Amos (A)

Self- Mace (E)

[blank] – Graham (E)

[blank] – Self

[underlined] SAGAN [/underlined]

N.

103/8

AMOS (A)

BAINES (A) (Slater) (A)

BRICKHILL (A)

COLLETT (E)

EDWARDS (E)

Self

[underlined] BELARIA [/underlined]

4/6

WILLIAMS (E)

GOODWIN (E)

BUCKLEY (I)

CULLING (E)

ALLEN (E)

KOCH (A)

WATSON (S)

HAYDEN

LEWIS (E)

OLDING (C)

HUNTER (C)

SELF

(HUGHES (E)

MACKENZIE (I)

OSBORNE (A)

Luckenwalde 220 others

[page break]

93

[underlined] Cooking [/underlined]

To boil water a large jug labelled “Kein Trinkwasser” (no drinking water) is used.

For 130 men in a barrack, the Reich supplies 3 large brown pots – nothing else. This is supplemented by Canadian Red X pots & frying pans.

Baking and frying is mostly done in trays made from Klim tins.

There is one stove 3’ x 2 1/2', with an oven with 2 shelves, coal fired. Each room has to share with another one, having 3/4 of an hour in the afternoon & the same in the evening. (Catering thus for 24 men.)

All flour is obtained by grinding down biscuits.

[page break]

94

[underlined] MAIL AVERAGE TIME 2 – 3 MONTHS EACH WAY [/underlined]

[underlined] FIRST LETTER WRITTEN [/underlined] 12-5-41

[underlined] FIRST LETTER RECIEVED [sic] [/underlined] 16-6-41

[underlined] PARCELS [/underlined] MINIMUM 2 -3 MONTHS

1st. CLOTHING PARCEL 16-10-41 (SECOND SENT, 1st. LOST)

1st. CIG. PARCEL 19-8-41

1st. AMERICAN PRIV. PARCEL 21-9-41

TOTAL AMER. PRIV. PARCELS RECVD. 34

- DUTCH - - - 11

[underlined] RED X PARCELS RECVD. BY ROOM OF 3 MEN [/underlined]

[line chart]

[page break]

95

[underlined] Choc. Raisin Pie [/underlined]

Line tray with shortened pastry and bake. Boil raisins, add butter, sugar, choc. or cocoa, and milk. Bring to boil and thicken. Spread on pastry and serve cold with cream.

[underlined] Amer. Do-nuts [/underlined]

Fill dough-nut with ice-cream, pour over choc. sauce, or cream. Sprinkle with chopped nuts.

[underlined] Candied Carrots [/underlined]

Boil and mash carrots. Spread with honey or syrup and bake in oven.

[page break]

96

[underlined] Piyella [sic] [/underlined]

Semi-fry rice until fat is soaked up. Add little saffron, and bake in oven, adding little water and turning over constantly Fry chopped ham, bacon and pork, add same to above. Fry carrots, peas, onions etc and add to above. Bake well, with continual mixing to prevent top getting too crisp. (Pre-cook veg.)

[underlined] Klim icing [/underlined]

Mix dry klim, butter and sugar cold.

[page break]

97

[underlined] PHOTOS. [/underlined] ON MARCH: JAS. HILL

R.A.F. PHOTO UNIT

PINEWOOD STUDIOS

DENHAM.

LUCKENWALDE: JOSE MULLER

ROBERT CARMAN

JEFFERSON

IOWA, U.S.A.

[page break]

98

[black and white photograph of head and shoulders of Max Schmelling]

[page break]

99

[underlined] Autograph photo of Max Schmelling: [/underlined] obtained during his visit to Luckenwalde on March 2nd. 1945.

Reason of visit unknown, perhaps connected with visit of unknown S.S. Obergruppenfuhrer. Air raid alarm that morning for 2 hrs.

[page break]

100

K.H. ANTHONY,

90. QUEENSBURY AVE.

TORONTO, 13 (GROV. 8011)

N.N. AMOS

122, ALEXANDRA ROAD

CLAYFIELD. BRISBANE (M 3595)

R.P. BAINES

3, CAMBRIDGE ST.

NORTH BRIGHTON S. 6

MELBOURNE. (X 3058)

ROBIN BUCHANAN

STONEHAM

HELENSBURGH (116)

S/L G.N.S. CAMPBELL

4. MEADWAY,

LITTLE THURROCK

GRAYS. ESSEX

O.S.R. COLLETT

PULHAM MARKET

DISS,

NORFOLK

A.G. EDWARDS

1, FILEY ROAD,

NEWPORT, MON.

S. WALES.

2/L DAVID FARRELL

430, JUNIPERO

LONG BEACH

CALIFORNIA (3 – 2928)

H. GOODWIN,

150, WIGHTMAN RD.

HORNSEY. LON. N.8 (MOV 6448)

LT. BILL MOSES (C/O JULES CLUB JERMYN ST. LOND.)

1705, WAYNE AVE.

S. PASADENA

CALIFORNIA.

PADRE MACDONALD

PORTREE

SKY.

K.W. MACKENZIE

’LAKEVIEW’

ENNISKILLEN

N. IRELAND

TICH READ,

HILL LANE

RUISLIP

MIDDLESEX

SAM, SMALL,

P.O. BOX 999

DURBAN.

S.A.

R.D. SHUMAN

STATESBORO,

GEORGIA.

ART HUNTER

530 N. BRODIE ST.

FORT WILLIAM

ONTARIO (SOUTH 2254)

R.J. ALLEN

BREVET CLUB

CHARLES ST.

LONDON.

48, BAKER ST.

WESTON.

J.M. OLDING.

638, TRANSIT RD.

VICTORIA

B.C.

JOE HUNT

241, POWELL AV.

OTTAWA

ONTARIO

J.K. WATSON,

MANIWAKI

QUEBEC

[page break]

101

J. CARRIE,

35, HOWARD ST.

ARBROATH.

W.C. HOWELL

45 EASTBOURNE CRES.

MIMICO, ONTARIO

J.L. WILSON (WILLIE)

1046 ALGONA AV.

MOOSE JAW, SASK.

R.G. CLARKE.

173, WESTMORLAND AV.

TORONTO. ONT.

B.M. FITZGERALD

6, PROVENCHAR APTS

ST. BONIFACE, MAN.

E.L. HOUGHTON

20, KARAKA ST.

PALMERSTON. NORTH I.N. 2

J. McCAGUE.

C/O MRS. CUMMINGS

1144 11S DALE AVE. N

TORONTO

WYNN AYER

1543 NORTH PROSPECT AVE,

MILWAUKEE.

WIS. U.S.A.

GEO. HARSH

2814, PEACHTREE ROAD

ATLANTA, GEO.

U.S.A.

WILF KIPP

425 FADER ST.

NEW WESTMINSTER. B.C.

A.H. DEACON.

SOUTHWOOD

BROADSTONE

DORSET.

P.N. BOYLE

DINVIN

PORT PATRICK,

P.P. 200

STRANRAER.

FRANK DOLLING

16 VINCENT RD.

TOTTENHAM

LONDON N. 15

TEL. BOW 1361

GORDON GALLAGHER

2341, KEMPER LANE

CINCINNATI

OHIO

W.H. CULLING

18, WOODLANDS RD.

BUSHEY

HERTS. (WATFORD 2904)

JOHN H. RATHBONE

3067 STRATFORD AVE.

LINCOLN 2, NEBRASKA

L.O. STANLEY

68, STRATHCONA AVE.

TORONTO.

ONT.

W.A. HORSLEY

14 Wolseley St.,

DRUMMOYNE: Sydney

WA2038 ov JA 1492

JOSE MULLER

18, IRWIN ROAD,

BEDFORD

ENGLAND.

124 VAN SCHOOR STRAAT

BRUSSELS

BELGIUM.

[page break]

102

WINTER SPORTS. 1 MONTH

Patrick Conyton

The Rectory

Bonchwoch.

Ventnor 357. Isle of Wight

[underlined] Clothing [/underlined] Take with you Lounge Suit Dinner Jacket

Travel in flannels & sports jacket

Ski boots, ski socks, trousers cap and jacket to be purchased in [underlined] non winter resort [/underlined] swiss town approx £3.10

[underlined] Fare [/underlined] Reduced Swiss Federal Rly Excursion fare can be done £5 - £7 return.

[underlined] Localities: [/underlined] Suggest 14 days Adelboden in the Berner Oberland, Do not pay more than 1 £ a day all in. Write to Fran Gurtnev Grand Hotel & mention

[page break]

105

my name, if she is unable to do it at price ask for her advice saying you are Ex P.O.W. & old friend of mine

Hire Skis, (good ones essential)

Best Ski teacher in S = Christian Pierien

[underlined] 2nd fortnight [/underlined] AROSA (Grissons)

Travel across Switzerland 3rd class suggest POSTE HOTEL, or SCHWEIZERHOF try Pow flannel & ask for moderate terms, you can always change if unsuitable, book for 1 week. Poste Hotel is 1/2 mile from Nursry [sic] slopes. Schweizerhof 1/4 mile. Magnificent place, bags of sun & good snow. Take camera. Overheads according to what you want, I found 5/- - 10/- ample per day but unecessary. [sic]

Total cost: Fares £7.10

Hotel £30

Clothes & skis £5

Etc £6.10

£50 Can be done for £40 without discomfort

P.T.O.

[page break]

106

Best months: February & March., End of January quite good too.

Before leaving England take exercises to strengthen ankles, legs, thighs, saves a lot of stiffness later.

Get in touch with me first & I may be able to fix you up some things as I have my own skis, skates boots etc. It is also much cheaper to stay in private chalets, good bed & food but no hotel special comforts. This would need enquiring into from my friends etc. Speaking German a great help for mixing with Swiss in good cheap pubs, avoid smart set & lovely lovelies who fall down in front of you & say “Ooo how strong you are” when you pick them up.

ALWAYS PICK PLACES WITH SUN (eg Avoid Grindelwald)

Rucksac [sic] essential

[page break]

107

[underlined] Programme for meeting in London. [/underlined]

Stay [underlined] Wings Club. [/underlined]

[underlined] Evening: [/underlined] Visit: Shephards

Cumberland Bar

Hay in the Pound

Berkely [sic] Square

Scotts

Café Royal

Hamburger

[underlined] Next Day: [/underlined] Breakfast: at Dorchester

Lunch: at Majorca

Tea: at Shearns

Wings Club

Snack

Show

Scotts

Pubs

Bath House

[page break]

108

[drawing of blocks in camp with volleyball and basketball courts]

FORE:- Theatre & Loudspeakers & Volleyball

BACK:- Block One, Tents & Basketball court [signature]

[page break]

109

[plan drawing of interior of block]

[page break]

110

[drawing of bunk beds inside block]

[signature] 3/9/44

[page break]

111

[blank page]

[page break]

112

[German label]

Konnisbrot

[aerial photograph]

Windows, from Am daylight on March 15th, 1945

[two sets of Windows]

Picked up at Luckenwalde.

[page break]

113

[blank page]

[page break]

[map drawing]

[page break]

[blank page]

[page break]

[blank page]

Collection

Citation

Jim Tyrie, “Jim Tyrie's Wartime Log. One,” IBCC Digital Archive, accessed October 24, 2020, https://ibccdigitalarchive.lincoln.ac.uk/omeka/collections/document/22224.

Item Relations

This item has no relations.

Can you help improve this description?